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old 02-01-2016  
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Texsport Texsport is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 521
New CineStill 120 Indiegogo Campaign

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/c...lm/x/8977692#/

I've already pledged - come on!

Texsport

 




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old 02-01-2016
Texsport
Registered User
Goal is $120,000 - claimed delivery in July 2016.

$2,400 raised in first 2 hours!

$5,346 in under 3 hours!

$13,000 inside of 5 hours! 11% funded.

Texsport
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old 02-01-2016
tomken
Registered User
Will definitely pledge to get few rolls and JCH case!
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old 02-01-2016
Hogarth Ferguson
Registered User
Yeah, gonna pledge 100 so I can get five rolls and the case.
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old 02-01-2016
Texsport
Registered User
I went with 100 also.

Texsport
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old 02-01-2016
krötenblender
Registered User
I'm in... Already like the 135mm/ISO800 version very much, must be great with 6x7.
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old 02-02-2016
zauhar
Registered User
Clearly film is not dead.

I recently tried the 35mm version in a venue with spotty light, and the ISO 800 is no joke, if anything I overexposed. The colors from this film are striking.

Made my contribution, look forward to a roll to try with my 'new' Mamiya.

Randy

P.S. I also supported Film Ferrania, that enterprise seems to still be limping along. ;-(
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old 02-02-2016
Texsport
Registered User
43% funded after the 1st day!

Looking good

Texsport
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old 02-02-2016
Hogarth Ferguson
Registered User
They tried a kickstarter when Ferrania and new55 were up, they wanted 320k and only got 120k, with indigogo, they will get the money regardless of how much they raise, which is an advantage of this platform. This is promising, though, that they are at 55k already.
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old 02-04-2016
Texsport
Registered User
I increased my contribution to the 10 rolls of 120 level.

Now 57% funded after 2 days.

Texsport
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old 02-04-2016
Dante_Stella
Rex canum cattorumque
So who is actually making the film?

Dante
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old 02-04-2016
cjm
Registered User
The film is prepared and sold by The Brothers Wright. See also twinlenslife.com. I met them in 2011 when they shot my friends' wedding. Nice guys. I believe they purchase a motion picture film and then remove the Remjet themselves.
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old 02-04-2016
tonyc
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjm View Post
The film is prepared and sold by The Brothers Wright. See also twinlenslife.com. I met them in 2011 when they shot my friends' wedding. Nice guys. I believe they purchase a motion picture film and then remove the Remjet themselves.
In this case it would appear they need to purchase a master roll from Kodak
as 65mm motion picture stock still has perforations when cut down to
the required 60mm of 120 film.
Hence their need for significant funding.

Interestingly they are marketing a 500T stock as 800ASA . . .
But people seem to get good results, even with using the incorrect C41 process.
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old 02-04-2016
Texsport
Registered User
Most cameras index the 135 version at 500.

The wide exposure flexibility of the film allows frequent use ranging from 400 to 800, depending on lighting, effect desired, and filters used.

I have had satisfying results at a night time music concert at 800 in a Widelux,
and using Canon and Nikon lenses/cameras with 85B filters rated at 400 and 500 for naturally lit portraits.

There was considerable beta testing which led to the 800T rating, but their website and Flickr contain many examples at different settings.

Texsport
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old 02-04-2016
Mephiloco
Registered User
That's expensive for Kodak short ends, imo
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old 02-04-2016
BLKRCAT
100% Film
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mephiloco View Post
That's expensive for EASTMAN short ends, imo
corrected

I won't support cinestill. I'll support Kodak Alaris by buying their Tri-X, Portra, and Ektar films.
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old 02-04-2016
robert blu
quiet photographer
Love CineStill in 135 ...and anxious to try in 120
robert
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old 02-04-2016
jojoman2
Registered User
How much do you folks think it would cost to process this film as opposed to processing your own b&w film? Would it be fairly comperable?
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old 02-04-2016
Mephiloco
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLKRCAT View Post
corrected

I won't support cinestill. I'll support Kodak Alaris by buying their Tri-X, Portra, and Ektar films.
My cans say Kodak :\
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old 02-04-2016
bluesun267
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLKRCAT View Post
corrected

I won't support cinestill. I'll support Kodak Alaris by buying their Tri-X, Portra, and Ektar films.
I think there's something in this statement. While a master roll is a master roll in the manufacturing sense, buying and using Kodak's already-made still film supports their continued offering of still films.

I tried Cine-still a couple years ago and it had small-medium size dark spots on several frames, presumably from rem-jet that had not been completely removed. For that reason (and price) I steered clear since then. Has anyone else had that problem or was it a fluke?
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old 02-04-2016
BLKRCAT
100% Film
Kodak Alaris covers the consumer still film production. Eastman Kodak cover cinema film production. The two companies are separate.

I've brought this up before. Buying from eastman takes money away from alaris. When alaris starts hiking prices and slashing emulsions a la fuji don't come crying home.
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old 02-04-2016
tonyc
Registered User
Short ends ? !
The 120 rolls couldn't be made from
cine rolls, or short ends.
If it was, you would have the 65mm sprockets on the image of
your film.

Regarding price, for the 135 format it is certainly much much cheaper
to buy your own short ends, but with the small inconvenience of DIY
ramjet removal.

Homemade ECN-2 chemicals are very easy to mix up from scratch
and quite cheap.
As with C41 temperature stability is very important.

I regularly shoot and home ECN-2 develope 250D & 500T, they are great
stocks, and for me the only affordable way to shoot colour film.

-TC
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old 02-04-2016
Justin Smith
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyc View Post
Short ends ? !
The 120 rolls couldn't be made from
cine rolls, or short ends.
If it was, you would have the 65mm sprockets on the image of
your film.
Most of the beta test shots I've seen do have the sprocket holes. I suspect the holes are being cropped on some images that are posted.
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old 02-05-2016
tonyc
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Smith View Post
Most of the beta test shots I've seen do have the sprocket holes. I suspect the holes are being cropped on some images that are posted.
Indeed.
I think they are testing with 65mm Perf stock, and then when they have
enough kickstarter money they can order a master roll from Kodak.

Also Nick & Trick in the UK have been supplying this stock cut down to
120 size ( curtesy of M.I. 4 shooting in 65mm in UK studios = cheap short ends )

-TC
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old 02-05-2016
jsrockit
Moderator
Everyone complains about film prices, yet they buy $15 rolls of film that don't exist no problem... oh, and collectible stickers?
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old 02-05-2016
Mephiloco
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyc View Post
Short ends ? !
The 120 rolls couldn't be made from
cine rolls, or short ends.
If it was, you would have the 65mm sprockets on the image of
your film.

Regarding price, for the 135 format it is certainly much much cheaper
to buy your own short ends, but with the small inconvenience of DIY
ramjet removal.

Homemade ECN-2 chemicals are very easy to mix up from scratch
and quite cheap.
As with C41 temperature stability is very important.

I regularly shoot and home ECN-2 develope 250D & 500T, they are great
stocks, and for me the only affordable way to shoot colour film.

-TC
I was referring to the 35mm, which would be short ends. Their prices for the 35mm are pricey considering 500T short ends can be had for a song. You can get fresh 400' cans for under $100 regularly these days as well.

I don't know how they're doing the 120. I've got some 5213 and 5219 short ends in 65mm and unless I'm horribly mistaken the sprockets would be in frame were they loaded into a 120 camera.

I'm guessing their beta rolls have perfs and that after a successful indiegogo campaign they plan on buying a master.

The only other possibility is maybe they got some 2383 but I highly doubt that would provide good results.

I've got a ton of 5213 and 5219, out of curiosity when you develop yours do you remove the remjet prior to exposing or prior to developing? I've never done C41 processing or ECN2 at home and feel bad having all these thousands of feet going to waste.
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old 02-05-2016
santino
eXpect me
What about the normal day light film (50 ISO I think)? Yesterday I ordered one in 135mm.. is it great too or did I make a mistake and should buy 800 ISO tungsten stuff and use filters?
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old 02-05-2016
bluesun267
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by santino View Post
What about the normal day light film (50 ISO I think)? Yesterday I ordered one in 135mm.. is it great too or did I make a mistake and should buy 800 ISO tungsten stuff and use filters?
Whether you like the look is a matter of taste. The Cinestill will produce halos around point light sources and a bit of a softer look since the anti-halation backing is removed. For my taste (and wallet), Ektar 100 is the way to go, that is when I'm not shooting slides.
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old 02-05-2016
Bisakok
Registered User
For the Cinestill 800T in 120, the beta rolls are produced from 65mm motion picture stock (which has perforations obviously) but the final product will be produced from a special order film with no perforations.
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old 02-05-2016
robert blu
quiet photographer
Quote:
Originally Posted by santino View Post
What about the normal day light film (50 ISO I think)? Yesterday I ordered one in 135mm.. is it great too or did I make a mistake and should buy 800 ISO tungsten stuff and use filters?
Of course it's very personal taste, I like the 50 iso fil because of the colors palette.

robert

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old 02-05-2016
tonyc
Registered User
bluesun267
Indeed the only downside of the Cinestill product [apart from price] is that without the ramjet backing, there will be some pretty retro
halos on any point source highlights, which might not be everyones taste.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mephiloco View Post
I've got a ton of 5213 and 5219, out of curiosity when you develop yours do you remove the remjet prior to exposing or prior to developing? I've never done C41 processing or ECN2 at home and feel bad having all these thousands of feet going to waste.
I use the Kodak ECN-2 Prebath solution [£10 for 20L !! a few years ago] but you can make it up, it is a very basic formula. [ Borax, Sodium Sulfate, & Sodium Hydroxide ]

Soak film for 2min.
Dump.
Fill with fresh water, and shake the tank vertically, very, very
vigorously.
This washes off 99% of the ramjet.
Then after Dev, Bleach, Fix, Stabilise, I use a stablise solution soaked
lint free cloth wiped down the film a couple of times to take
off any remaining particles of ramjet.

Works a treat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by santino View Post
What about the normal day light film (50 ISO I think)? Yesterday I ordered one in 135mm.. is it great too or did I make a mistake and should buy 800 ISO tungsten stuff and use filters?
The Kodak 50D stock is amazing, almost zero grain.
Like shooting on slide but with a proper dynamic range.

PS someone should start a "Shot on Kodak Vision3" thread !

-TC
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old 02-05-2016
Bisakok
Registered User
I guess if the 800T campaign is successful, it will be swiftly followed by a 50D one.
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old 02-05-2016
santino
eXpect me
It certainly has a unique look. Is it fog or the above mentioned halos (from the sun) in the picture? I think I'm going to like it, the colors look very "filmish".

BTW. is it still possible to develop Kodachrome? I still have three rolls of Kodachrome 64 in the fridge (back in the days I used to send it to Kodak in Lausanne).

Quote:
Originally Posted by robert blu View Post
Of course it's very personal taste, I like the 50 iso fil because of the colors palette.

robert

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old 02-05-2016
Texsport
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bisakok View Post
I guess if the 800T campaign is successful, it will be swiftly followed by a 50D one.
I certainly hope so.

64% funded with 22 days to go1

Texsport
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old 02-05-2016
robert blu
quiet photographer
@santino: it's early morning fog.

These ar colors from a few hours later



The red halo (strong!) I found in the 800 iso film (of course 135) like in this photo, personally it doesn't disturb me!

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old 02-05-2016
Huss
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by santino View Post
I think I'm going to like it, the colors look very "filmish".
For some reason I find this amusing. Film looking like film.


Only way to develop Kodachrome now is as B&W images. The prices I have seen (maybe there are cheaper options) is $60 a roll! I think the place was filmrescue.com
I have 4 rolls in the fridge, I think they are going to remain there...
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old 02-05-2016
santino
eXpect me
@huss:
I meant "motion-picturesque", off course - stupid German-English mix up.

@robert:
I see, the reds don't bother me seither - I actually like it. Thanks for demonstration.
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old 02-09-2016
Texsport
Registered User
CineStill 50D is advertised as the "finest grained color film available"

CineStill 800T can be shot at 400 or 500 with 85B filter in daylight - particularly for portraits, it is very nice.

After 8 days 80% funded for 800T 120 film production, 65% funded for 800T 4X5 sheet film, and 50% funded for 50D 120 film production.

Texsport
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old 02-09-2016
Texsport
Registered User
Link to many different CineStill images, 50D, 800T, and 400T + 81B correcting filter.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...till&FORM=IGRE

Texsport
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old 02-09-2016
krötenblender
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texsport View Post
CineStill 50D is advertised as the "finest grained color film available"
...
After 8 days 80% funded for 800T 120 film production, 65% funded for 800T 4X5 sheet film, and 50% funded for 50D 120 film production.
Is there a specific campaign for each type of film? I backed the 800T/120 but I can not find a perk getting 50D only... I would love to have a few rolls of that also.
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