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-   -   Sigma Sd Quattro "H" Images (http://www.rangefinderforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=164509)

Yokosuka_Mike 03-18-2018 13:51

Sigma Sd Quattro "H" Images
 
Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 "Art" lens
Yokohama, Japan - March 18, 2018












Jamie Pillers 03-18-2018 14:53

Thanks for posting these, Mike. Are these images made from OOC jpegs, or RAW files processed through Sigma software? Or DNG? Thanks.

Keith 03-18-2018 18:38

There is still something that sets the foeveon sensor aside from all the other digital cameras and noticeable in those examples. Enormous detail but without that sharpness that can make digital images look a bit harsh.

Yokosuka_Mike 03-18-2018 21:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jamie Pillers (Post 2796905)
Thanks for posting these, Mike. Are these images made from OOC jpegs, or RAW files processed through Sigma software? Or DNG? Thanks.

Hi Jamie!

Short answer: I shoot in RAW and process in Sigma software.

Long answer: When I first got my Sigma SD1 Merrill I watched a simple YouTube review by Angela Nicholson and she said that the JPEGS OOC were a bit flat compared to processing the RAW files with the Sigma Photo Pro software. So, right from the begining I always shot in RAW and processed in the Sigma software. I always enjoyed the results and the time consumming process doesn't bother me. When I purchased the Sigma Sd Quattro and later the Quattro H I just continued following the process I was already in the habit of doing.

A point of possible interest to you is that 100% of the time I process in the Auto mode and then occasionally I override the result if I'm not happy with it. That almost always means that I tweak the exposure setting one way or another. Most of the time Auto mode gets it right (in my opinion). If I was smarter I might tweak the other settings or have pre-set custom settings; but I'm not smarter so I don't.

Sorry for giving you such a lengthy detailed (rambling) answer to your short question but there it is.

The YouTube review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIwPtxzhTKI

Yokosuka_Mike 03-19-2018 13:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by Keith (Post 2796931)
There is still something that sets the foeveon sensor aside from all the other digital cameras and noticeable in those examples. Enormous detail but without that sharpness that can make digital images look a bit harsh.

Well said, Keith, you certainly nailed it with the "Enormous detail but without that sharpness that can make digital images look a bit harsh" part.

For me it's not only the foeveon sensor, it's the simplicity of the Sigma cameras too. When I use the SD1 Merrill or the Sd Quattro I feel like I'm back to using my old Canon F1N only without the film. No bells or whistles - just straight forward photography.

Yokosuka_Mike 03-19-2018 14:01

I better put up some more images or it'll look like I hijacked a thread about images.

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 18-35mm f1.8 "Art" lens
Yokohama, Japan










shawn 03-19-2018 15:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yokosuka_Mike (Post 2796944)

Long answer: When I first got my Sigma SD1 Merrill I watched a simple YouTube review by Angela Nicholson and she said that the JPEGS OOC were a bit flat compared to processing the RAW files with the Sigma Photo Pro software.

With the Merrill's that would be true.

Try JPEGs on the SD Quattro's. They can be extremely good. These are SOOC JPEGs from the SDQH with the 'A' firmware version.

For example:


or 105mm Macro @F8



Same thing on a Fuji X Pro 2 with 90mm Tamron Macro @F8



Shawn

Jamie Pillers 03-20-2018 13:00

Shawn,
These are lovely images. I like the way you chose exposure a lot.

Can you tell which jpeg 'film type' you used? I've been primarily using the "Neutral" setting until now.

Quote:

Originally Posted by shawn (Post 2797100)
With the Merrill's that would be true.

Try JPEGs on the SD Quattro's. They can be extremely good. These are SOOC JPEGs from the SDQH with the 'A' firmware version.

For example:
or 105mm Macro @F8
Same thing on a Fuji X Pro 2 with 90mm Tamron Macro @F8

Shawn


shawn 03-20-2018 13:09

Hi Jaime,

Thanks, for the Sigma images it was the neutral picture type. On the Fuji it was Provia.

Shawn

Jamie Pillers 03-20-2018 13:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yokosuka_Mike (Post 2797084)
Well said, Keith, you certainly nailed it with the "Enormous detail but without that sharpness that can make digital images look a bit harsh" part.

For me it's not only the foeveon sensor, it's the simplicity of the Sigma cameras too. When I use the SD1 Merrill or the Sd Quattro I feel like I'm back to using my old Canon F1N only without the film. No bells or whistles - just straight forward photography.

I agree also re: Keith's assessment and Mike's. I'd add that I very much like the way these cameras slow everything down. The whole process of exposure and processing feels much more akin to using film gear. I love the Sigma for that... and the wonderful image quality of course. :)

Keith 03-20-2018 13:44

The photos in this thread are truly sublime. Remarkable camera in an age where soaring ISO capabilities, focus speed and a lot of things that many of us don't really care about seem to rule design. Thank god for Sigma and their unique approach to digital photography. :)

Yokosuka_Mike 03-27-2018 04:20

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 DG "Art" lens (46mm on Sd Quattro H)
Yokohama, Japan - March 27, 2018
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma software set in Auto mode.














Keith 03-27-2018 14:21

I never get sick of looking at images from the H. :)

froyd 03-27-2018 15:01

Stunning rendering (and great images Mike!). I always thought that if I wanted a digital for color work it would be down to Epson and Sigma.

Yokosuka_Mike 03-28-2018 00:09

Keith, Froyd, thank you for the kind remarks, much appreciated.

Yokosuka_Mike 03-29-2018 03:42

In a nod to Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground I call this set of pictures "The Velvia Underground"


Lou Reed - March 2, 1942 – October 27, 2013 - RIP

Sigma Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 "Art" lens
Yokohama, Japan

Run Run Run


I'll Be Your Mirror


Femme Fatale


What Goes On


I Can't Stand It


Sweet Jane


Rock And Roll


Beginning To See The Light

shawn 03-29-2018 16:43

Heading downstream....









First three are Rokinon 14mm, last one is the Sigma 70mm macro.

Shawn

Yokosuka_Mike 03-30-2018 04:02

^^^ Great images, Shawn, thanks for sharing - hope to see more from you.


Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 DG "Art" lens (46mm on Sd Quattro H)
Yokohama, Japan - March 2018
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma software set in Auto mode.












karateisland 03-30-2018 04:39

These colors! I had written off the Sigmas as expensive toys, but this thread is making me rethink that...

Yokosuka_Mike 04-11-2018 14:14

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 85mm f1.4 EX DG lens (113mm on Sd Quattro H)
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma Photo Pro software in "Auto" mode.
Lens was focused manually for all images.
Yokohama, Japan - April 2018

After the rain in Yokohama park


















Yokosuka_Mike 04-17-2018 14:33

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX DG lens (26mm on Sd Quattro H)
Yokohama, Japan - April 2018

The Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX DG lens is no longer manufactured by Sigma. I still happily use it mainly because the minimum focus distance is 20cm; that and the fast f1.8 aperture is nice too! Auto focus for the older Sigma EX DG lenses on the new Sigma Sd Quattro cameras is (in my opinion) not reliable but that doesn't matter to me because I prefer manual focus in most situations. Anyway here are a few candid shots taken last week.








Yokosuka_Mike 04-30-2018 13:58

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 EX DG lens (32mm-93mm on Sd Quattro H)
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma Photo Pro software.
Yokohama, Japan - April 2018




















Dan Daniel 04-30-2018 15:30

Wonderful. Great images and color.

Maybe you've discussed this. You are either very short, sitting on a bench, or are holding the camera down, almost like a TLR at chest height. The Sigma H doesn't have a tilting screen. Can you say a bit about how you are framing?

LCSmith 04-30-2018 16:26

Those are phenomenal colors. Great photos too!

Yokosuka_Mike 04-30-2018 18:37

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan Daniel (Post 2807060)
Wonderful. Great images and color.

Maybe you've discussed this. You are either very short, sitting on a bench, or are holding the camera down, almost like a TLR at chest height. The Sigma H doesn't have a tilting screen. Can you say a bit about how you are framing?

Hi Dan,

When I shoot with the Sigma Sd Quattro and some other cameras as well and Iím doing people pictures I frequently shoot from chest level. Iím 6í 1Ē tall and I like a lower perspective versus me shooting down on people. To do this with the Sd Quattro I set the focus scale to just under 1 meter (or whatever distance is appropriate) pick a suitable aperture with regards to the existing light and the lens Iím using (usually anywhere between f2.8 and f5.6) and then holding the camera at chest level I walk up to the subject and when Iím where I want to be I take the picture.

It would be difficult for me to stoop over while I look through the viewfinder and walk down the street taking pictures. For me street photography is very dynamic; people are not going to stand still while I try to focus on them and then take their picture. And, autofocus is a non-starter, way too slow.

When Iím taking pictures of static subjects like flowers, cityscapes, ships, etc... I almost always look through the viewfinder and focus manually. I always carry a newspaper in my backpack to sit on or kneel on when Iím going for a low angle. At age 62 squatting down for extended periods of time while I compose, focus and shoot is all well and good until I try to stand back up - ugh! So, now I just sit and or kneel on the ground.

Iíll do what I need to do to get a shot: hold the camera over my head, use the viewfinder, hold the camera at chest level, bend over and hold the camera level with the subject, sit on the ground and even put the camera on the ground for an extreme low level perspective. Fortunately the Sigma lenses (in my opinion) are easy to work with and with a knowledge of the basics of photography I can get pretty good results weather I look through the viewfinder or not.

Lastly, like most things, a lot of practice helps.

Sorry for the longish answer, I hope it makes sense to you and it gives you what you wanted to know.

Doug 04-30-2018 21:20

Interesting explanation, Mike, thanks!

Keith 04-30-2018 22:18

It's only being viewed on a computer monitor admittedly but I have yet to see an output from any other camera I like as much as this H. If I wasn't so non financial currently I'd have one in a shot. :)

I like your explanation of your street approach as well.

Dan Daniel 05-01-2018 04:18

Thanks for the discussion of your camera methods, Mike.

Having used a TLR extensively, your angle is very familiar. One thing I have always noticed about a TLR is that people seem to pay no attention to it. I can be looking through it and framing from a meter distance from someone and if they glance over they do not react. I imagine that the Sigma creates a different dynamic if you hold it to your face in the street.

Yokosuka_Mike 05-01-2018 12:39

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 EX DG lens (32mm-93mm on Sd Quattro H)
Shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma Photo Pro software.
Yokohama, Japan - April 2018

A few more from the same day as the last set.














Yokosuka_Mike 05-04-2018 14:29

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 DG "Art" lens (46mm on Sd Quattro H)
Yokohama, Japan - May 2018
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma software.
























Yokosuka_Mike 05-11-2018 14:00

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 DG "Art" lens (46mm on Sd Quattro H)
Yokohama, Japan - May 2018
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma software.
















Steve M. 05-11-2018 18:26

I don't care for the shots outdoors in bright light. They have digital written all over them, and look much like any other digital camera.

The low light shots are a different story. They look very much like film, and good colours at that. The Fuji sensor is quite different from the others in low light. Very nice.

Yokosuka_Mike 05-12-2018 02:41

But it's all right now, I learned my lesson well
You see, ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself

Ricky Nelson - "Garden Party"

A few more from the same day.

Sigma Sd Quattro H, Sigma 35mm f1.4 DG "Art" lens (46mm on Sd Quattro H)
Yokohama, Japan - May 2018
Everything shot at ISO 100 and processed with Sigma software.

















Played them all the old songs, thought that's why they came
No one heard the music, we didn't look the same

--Ricky Nelson

Jamie Pillers 05-13-2018 10:31

SD Quattro H with Sigma 30mm f1.4 Art lens


Jamie Pillers 05-13-2018 10:32

SD Quattro H with 30/1.4 Art lens


Jamie Pillers 05-13-2018 10:34

SD Quattro H with 30/1.4 Art lens


Yokosuka_Mike 05-14-2018 12:59

^ Jamie, Well done! Those are some stunning images you've posted. I hope there are more to come in the near future.


Sigma Sd Quattro H - Sigma 35mm f1.4 "Art" lens
ISO 100, images processed with Sigma software
Yokohama, Japan

The Harbor View Park rose garden on a sunny day.









I noticed that most of the people here are of a certain age group. I fit right in.

shawn 05-14-2018 14:15







SDQH 20mm 1.8 EX

Shawn

Yokosuka_Mike 05-14-2018 17:51

^ Great shots, Shawn, I'm a big fan of the Sigma 20mm f1.8 EX DG lens.

Sigma Sd Quattro H - Sigma 35mm f1.4 "Art" lens
ISO 100, images processed with Sigma software
Yokohama, Japan












shawn 05-15-2018 13:02

Thanks Mike, I went looking for the 20mm based on your shots with it. Very cool lens.

Shawn


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