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Business / Philosophy of Photography Taking pics is one thing, but understanding why we take them, what they mean, what they are best used for, how they effect our reality -- all of these and more are important issues of the Philosophy of Photography. One of the best authors on the subject is Susan Sontag in her book "On Photography."

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Old 10-11-2013   #81
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Old 10-11-2013   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malcD View Post
it's started to get weird, can we go back to life in shadows
Weird how?

As a retired engineer that minored in industrial illustration, I can guarantee you that I would have killed to have our current "tools" to create images like seakayaker1's above. I will never, ever get those hours, days, weeks, months, years back -no matter how enjoyable they may have been at the time. Time I could use for life in shadows, etc...

I love it and would like to see more.
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Old 10-11-2013   #83
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Weird is good.
Not-weird is good too.
Like oranges and bananas - love 'em both.
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Old 10-11-2013   #84
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we seem to have gone from post photography darkroom to ?
what age do people retire in the states ?
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Old 10-11-2013   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malcD View Post
we seem to have gone from post photography darkroom to ?
what age do people retire in the states ?

I'm 68 and I've seen all the "classic" pictures I need to see, so I personally like stuff you might call "weird".
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Old 10-11-2013   #86
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Let me put it another way... I used the term "image."

I do not see a photo. I see an illustration. The media used to create it was simply a camera.

The term "extreme" was used in the thread title...
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Old 10-11-2013   #87
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it just seems that it's looks a bit like something my granddaughter does with her iphone and
apps
malcolm ps. your a year older than me --- but Jeff 48 and retired I'm just jealous
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Old 10-11-2013   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burancap View Post
I like ^^^^that^^^^ very much!

It has an industrial "technical illustration" from the 60's-70's look!

It was taken in one of the older industrial sections in south Seattle, a lot of Boeing and other aircraft businesses on the other side of the river.


Quote:
Originally Posted by malcD View Post
it just seems that it's looks a bit like something my granddaughter does with her iphone and
apps
malcolm ps. your a year older than me --- but Jeff 48 and retired I'm just jealous
. . . . . I would love to see some of your grandaughter's work!


Thanks for the comments everyone, they are all appreciated!

. . . . . another 30 days before reaching the young age of 62, retirement is on the mind but nowhere in site.

Well here is a triple exposure HDR photograph, with 3 images 91 Sec @ f11, 123 Sec @ f11, 153 sec @ f11. It may not be darkroom but I do enjoy playing with the images.

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Old 10-11-2013   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malcD View Post
it just seems that it's looks a bit like something my granddaughter does with her iphone and
apps

. . . .

That is a very good point of discussion, and I am not merely being argumentative on this - it is interesting.

If you judge pictures by how hard it was to make them, then photography is a sad joke compared to mixing
your own oils, smashing and mixing berries and eggs to make colors, making your own brushes and taking 3 years to execute a beautiful painting.

Which is probably why some in the art world say "photography is not art" (it's too easy).

Again, I am just putting thoughts on the table, because I have too much time on my hands at the moment
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Old 10-11-2013   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveleo View Post
If you judge pictures by how hard it was to make them, then photography is a sad joke compared to mixing
your own oils, smashing and mixing berries and eggs to make colors, making your own brushes and taking 3 years to execute a beautiful painting.
Well, there you have it. I called out the barge-crane image for all of the reasons you just brought up. I loved the manual process, but knowing what I know today -would I do it again, or grab a camera and spend a bit in a lightroom?

A lot of extreme post processing tends to be just that and I do not care for it. In the case of the image that I liked, I look at it and see A LOT of my time as previously spent. I can appreciate it for being a successful use of post process to reach an end, marketable goal. Again, using the camera as the media or the tool to produce it. This is the mind part of one's hobby/profession, not the heart's -unless, of course, you have slaved over the manual media in the past.
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Old 10-11-2013   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveleo View Post
That is a very good point of discussion, and I am not merely being argumentative on this - it is interesting.

If you judge pictures by how hard it was to make them, then photography is a sad joke compared to mixing
your own oils, smashing and mixing berries and eggs to make colors, making your own brushes and taking 3 years to execute a beautiful painting.

Which is probably why some in the art world say "photography is not art" (it's too easy).

Again, I am just putting thoughts on the table, because I have too much time on my hands at the moment

Interesting point ... so Capa's D-day photos are OK because it was difficult (in the extreme)?
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Old 10-11-2013   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrow View Post
Interesting point ... so Capa's D-day photos are OK because it was difficult (in the extreme)?

His work is "OK" (or not OK) for whatever reason the viewer decides they are.
(I won't even bring up the rumors that his girl friend -wife?, I forgot - actually took some of them ,
and that guy getting shot was just actually slipping on wet rocks or something!)

I very much appreciate the struggle and effort some people put into getting their pictures. However,
I also enjoy a good (?) picture without regard to how it was created.
And I also respect the opinion of the guy next to me who hates the stuff I love (he has every right to be stupid and wrong ) - that really is a joke, so please laugh.
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Brief Comment on LuLa
Old 10-12-2013   #93
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Brief Comment on LuLa

A short blurb over on The Luminous Landscape regarding "extreme postprocessing" :

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/es...g_around.shtml


from which I extract this . . .

The art of painting liberated itself from the shackles of academic "correctness" before the turn of the 19th century. The Impressionists, the Cubists, the Pointillists and all of the other movements at the time said – "Screw it. Straight representational painting has gotten boring. Let's shake things up". And thus we ended up with Picasso, Chagal, Degas, Monet and the rest of the gang that revitalized painting in the late 19th and early 20th Century.
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Old 02-25-2014   #94
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I started this thread but have lost track of it and not visited for a while till a member of the forum (DaveLeo) sent me a PM about it. (Thanks Dave) Kind of prompted me to come back and make a few more posts.

Even though I am happy to take images to an extreme I think that is most likely to succeed when I work WITH the image rather than against it. Here are some examples of me doing just that, I hope you enjoy them.............................................. ........

PS I think it helps make my point that photography is about making art (or can be) - not just about capturing a moment in time.

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This one is tweaked quite a lot in contrast and color saturation but is mainly a straight photo blurred through a moving camera and too low speed. A nice abstract effect.

BLUE CHAIRS


Blue chairs by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

Here too I took the opportunity to use a photo that was radically under exposed to give it even more contrast and make it look a little more moody and interesting by an extreme vignette.

DEEP DARK


Deep, dark by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

Here again I used the natural characteristics of the image and emphasized the colors and shapes to make them even more noticeable.

YELLOW CRANE, BLUE SKY



Yellow crane, blue sky by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

I really love reflections. Makes an ordinary image much more interesting. Here I bumped contrast and lowered the lighting to emphasize the layers of faces. I love this image - they dont come along often!

LAYERS IN SPACE AND TIME



Layers in time and space by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

Here it was mainly a matter of boosting the naturally occurring shadow to frame the subject and the distortion from the uneven glass surface. A bit extreme but simple.

FRAMED IN SHADOW



Framed in shadow by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

Here too - the image was out of focus and dark. So I decided to go for it and emphasize those qualities by darkening the shot even more and by adding some grain to emphasize the blur.

PIZZA


Pizza by yoyomaoz, on Flickr
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Old 03-04-2014   #95
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I have to call this "extreme pre-processing" in that it took a long while to make the things that you see in the picture.
The postprocessing is a simple layer (aluminum foil !) burned onto to the base picture (a playdough sculpture), with the values first inverted and blurred and much-reduced opacity. Not a very "extreme" process, but whatever . . . .

"Never Let Me Go" . . . .
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Old 06-21-2014   #96
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Thought I'd revive this old thread ....
This "look" is inspired by some polaroids the Godfrey has posted ...


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Old 01-26-2015   #97
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playing around with CS Watercolour filter + saturation boost. Close up of plane tree trunk.

by lynnb on Flickr
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Old 01-26-2015   #98
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Old 01-27-2015   #99
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interesting revitalized thread, many great inspiring images. Please let them come!
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Old 01-27-2015   #100
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"extreme" processing for a portrait . . .
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Old 01-27-2015   #101
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Here is a great article on Eugene Smith and his thoughts on image making.

http://petapixel.com/2015/01/26/w-eu...ation-process/

I had the great fortune of attending a talk he gave on his work back in 1976. Growing up, I was never under the impression the an image was finished until you put it through the darkroom. This article is a testament to the deep affinity Smith had for printmaking and what the final image should be. The negative was only the starting part. The print was where you put your heart and soul into it. After spending many years in the darkroom printing for myself and for others, I find this quite analogous, though many will not, to working with RAW files on the computer.
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Old 01-28-2015   #102
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Thanks for the link Keith. And Adams said this:
"The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance." - Ansel Adams

I don't think much has changed in that regard with digital. I think of it as a process starting with the capture and not being complete until the print. The entire process is important to the final piece. So post production or the darkroom is a very important step in the process. It is just as important as the capture.


As far as heavy manipulation of images it has been around since the very early days in photography. Henry Peach Robinson quickly comes to mind.
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Old 01-28-2015   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tekst View Post
I have a thing for symetry, so a lot of my shots go thru a fair amount of post processing.













Reminds me of the work of John Paul Caponigro
http://www.johnpaulcaponigro.com/pdfs/Wake.pdf
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Old 01-28-2015   #104
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Quite right Allen. Unless someone discovers some unknown photographer, Henry Peach Robinson was the very first photographer to use combination printing, the combining of different negatives, to form the final image.

The first image was a combination of 6 separate negatives. Quite a feat in those days!
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Old 01-28-2015   #105
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I've always like the way you do you images whether extreme or not so extreme. I'm, I guess, a old fashioned photo guy. I do lots of post processing when I take a low contrast image on a roll that I intend to develop for full sun. But they still come out looking pretty straight.

By the way, how do you copy and paste from Flickr now?
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Old 01-31-2015   #106
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Some excellent images in this thread. Getting away from the idea that an image must be an accurate representaton of the original can be incredibly liberating.



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Old 01-31-2015   #107
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LOVE both of those! ^
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Old 01-31-2015   #108
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I'll throw one into the mix. An obvious HDR shot, but given the contrast range of the scene, there was no other option than to blend multiple exposures. That being said, I still kind of like it.


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Old 01-31-2015   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post

By the way, how do you copy and paste from Flickr now?

Go to any photo page.

At the bottom right are some icons. Choose the one that looks like a bendy
outlined arrow pointing to the right. This opens up a "sharing" popup.

Under "code", choose BBCode. Pick your favourite size from the dropdown menu. Copy the resulting code and paste here in RFF.

Caveats:
1) sometimes the code isn't highlighted; choosing a different size then choosing the size you want again results in it all being highlighted by default. Better than click-dragging to select it all.

2) when you paste the BBCode, stupid Flickr puts the title information "dangling" next to the photo instead of underneath it. An extra line break takes care of this.

I love it when Flickr makes things way more complicated than they need to be.

[now back to your regularly scheduled thread]
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Old 02-01-2015   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwintle View Post
Go to any photo page.

At the bottom right are some icons. Choose the one that looks like a bendy
outlined arrow pointing to the right. This opens up a "sharing" popup.

Under "code", choose BBCode. Pick your favourite size from the dropdown menu. Copy the resulting code and paste here in RFF.

Caveats:
1) sometimes the code isn't highlighted; choosing a different size then choosing the size you want again results in it all being highlighted by default. Better than click-dragging to select it all.

2) when you paste the BBCode, stupid Flickr puts the title information "dangling" next to the photo instead of underneath it. An extra line break takes care of this.

I love it when Flickr makes things way more complicated than they need to be.

[now back to your regularly scheduled thread]
Thanks you, I tried something like that but it didn't work. But again thanks I'll use your instructions and see.
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Old 02-01-2015   #111
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Digital photography allows a level of plasticity close to that of painting and other arts. I get this intellectually, by my old aesthetic associations with photography still rebel. Even so, I see some images in this thread that I like.

(Reminds me of when I was a young man, living 2000 miles/3000 km up the Amazon. An old woman, telling me it was hard at her age to change her ways, said, "It's hard to untwist an old tree." :-)

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Old 02-01-2015   #112
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Here are a couple of post processed images where I was just experimenting with texture overlays, blurs, vignettes and the like applied to city skylines. I was inspired at the time by a series of paintings made by 19th century painter James Whistler.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=w...w=1920&bih=845

It is interesting that one of the following two turned out to have what I consider to be a very "bleak" mood and the other a quite warm and sensitive one. See if you can guess which is which.

City Nocturne 3 by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

City Nocturne 2 by yoyomaoz, on Flickr

The final one in my series. While I like the others better in some ways I think this comes closer to Whistlers series.

City Nocturne by yoyomaoz, on Flickr
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Old 02-02-2015   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tekst View Post
I have a thing for symetry, so a lot of my shots go thru a fair amount of post processing.













Very much like the symmetry of Atlanta artist Flournoy Holmes (of the famous Allman Brothers Band "Eat a Peach" album cover.)
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Old 02-02-2015   #114
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a little cross processing.
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Old 02-02-2015   #115
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It is interesting to see what and how people choose to post-process. I decided to experiment a little bit myself, just to see if I could come up with anything satisfactory - I used (half-)frames from my Olympus PEN D3. Turns out I'm actually rather pleased with these, so I figured I'd add them here, since it was this thread that got me fooling around with them in the first place.







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Old 02-02-2015   #116
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And a few more from the same batch:







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Old 02-06-2015   #117
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There are some great images on this thread. Many are really dealing with the enhancement of captured light in some way or another. The black and white ones, seem to add depth and contrast and the colour ones, 'play' with the individual colour tones. I also really like some of them which (appear to) have played with selective blurring, perhaps on individual channels.

One of mine.



Just to add to the mix, a before and after, which I discuss on this page a little bit.

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Old 02-07-2015   #118
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XE1+18-55zoom+Zeiss Softar#2+Gimp mods
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Old 02-08-2015   #119
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Extreme for me:

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A painterly Iris
Old 06-04-2015   #120
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A painterly Iris

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