Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Rangefinder Photography Discussion

Rangefinder Photography Discussion General discussions about Rangefinder Photography. This is a great place for questions and answers that are not addressed in a specific category. Take note there is also a General Photography forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

vintage cameras
Old 06-26-2005   #1
Kat
Registered User
 
Kat is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Philippines
Age: 38
Posts: 460
vintage cameras

Hi, I've been thinking about getting a 35mm compact/subcompact rangefinder, but I'm confused as to which kind to get. I've been looking at the Olympus XA, Canon Coronet, Yashica, Leica, Rollei, Minox, etc. I'm for photo quality, features and manual controls/flexibility, and I'd rather keep costs below $30. I don't really understand some of the technical photography terms, so I'm having a hard time comparing models. Any suggestions or ideas?

Last edited by Kat : 06-26-2005 at 10:10.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-26-2005   #2
wierdcollector
Keeper of The Horde
 
wierdcollector's Avatar
 
wierdcollector is offline
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: northern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 368
Hi Kat,
Chances are you won't be able to touch a Leica, Rollie, Minox, or Olympus XA for $30 so you're probably best looking for a Canon Canonet 17 Glll, Canonet 19, Canonet 28, Yashica Electro GSN, Yashica Lynx 5000, Konica Auto S, Wards AM550 (Konica Auto S rebadged), Konica Auto S2, or Fed 5/Zorki 4K. If you don't really understand some of the technical terms, it might be best to start off with an Electro GSN or Canonet 28 both of which are excellent and inexpensive ways to get your feet wet in RF's. Hope this helps. Curt in Canada.
__________________
The ten second rule is a little different at my house. When there are ten seconds left in an auction, it's time to fire off a bid.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-26-2005   #3
Kin Lau
Registered User
 
Kin Lau is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,680
For under $30-, then the most troublefree and easiest camera to start with is probably the Canonet 28. You'll likely have trouble getting even a non-working camera in your list for under $30-.
__________________
Of course I have a photographic memory: over exposed, under developed, grainy and out of focus

<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=583'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-26-2005   #4
peter_n
~
 
peter_n's Avatar
 
peter_n is offline
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 8,772
The Canonet 28 is a good suggestion. There's one going on eBay in about 4&1/2 hrs. that looks quite useful with zero bids so far.

Welcome to the forum BTW Kat!

__________________
_
~Peter

My RFF Gallery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-26-2005   #5
Brian Sweeney
Registered User
 
Brian Sweeney's Avatar
 
Brian Sweeney is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 14,912
You could also pick up a Minolta Hi-Matic 9 for about $30. Bigger than a Canon QL17, but sharp F1.7 lens.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-27-2005   #6
Kat
Registered User
 
Kat is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Philippines
Age: 38
Posts: 460
Thanks, everyone! Yeah, I saw how expensive some of these are going. I also saw some of those in my list cheaper (within my budget) in ebay...but I guess as the auction closes some bidders might drive the price up. I checked out the Canonet in ebay closing soon, it's not certain to work...I'd rather spend a little more than get something that needs work or will break down in a few months, as I don't know anyone who fixes them in my area.

My level of experience is rather low, never touched an SLR, learned only from my digital Minolta S414. But I'd like to get more serious, so I'd like something that's not impossible for a newbie like me to figure out, but I'll have lots of room to grow into.

How does the various models of Canonets and Yashicas mentioned above differ, and how do they compare to the Minolta Brian suggested? Any significant variance in construction and durability? Those are also important to me (might be a little flexible with budget for this), as the reason I started into looking at vintage was someone's mention of lomos to me. I found them interesting, but the questionable quality control I heard from others made me more inclined to stay away from the Russian models.

Last edited by Kat : 06-27-2005 at 03:44.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-27-2005   #7
RichardS
Registered User
 
RichardS is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Age: 90
Posts: 219
If you want to learn the differences between the various Yashica electros check Yashica-guy's site at http://www.yashica-guy.com/

I think you can also find sites for the other cameras you are interested in.

Dick
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=525'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-27-2005   #8
Kin Lau
Registered User
 
Kin Lau is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 1,680
Post a WTB (want to buy) in the 35mm classifieds here. You're much more likely to get a good working camera from a fellow RFF'er.
__________________
Of course I have a photographic memory: over exposed, under developed, grainy and out of focus

<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=583'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-27-2005   #9
ErnestoJL
Registered User
 
ErnestoJL's Avatar
 
ErnestoJL is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Argentina-Buenos Aires
Age: 66
Posts: 956
Hello Kat! welcome to the forum!
Basic specifications for the cameras you mentioned are:
Yashica Electro 35: Sh. sp. B; 30 sec to 1/500 sec. ap. priority; 45 m,m f 1.7; ISO to 1000
Yashica MG1: Sh. sp. B; 4 sec. to 1/500 sec. Ap. priority. Lens is 45 mm f 2.8; ISO to 800
Canonet G III QL17/19: Sh. sp. B; 1/4 to 1/500 sec.; Shutter prior. Lens 45 mm f 1.7 /1.9
Canonet QL25 and 28 are same but lens is either f2.5 or f 2.8. ISO to 800
Both Yashica models are bigger than the Canonets, shutter is mechanical with electronic timing. Shutter modes are Auto, B and flash (1/30 th).
Canonets ar very compact yet mechanical, with aperture scale in viewfinder. Non metering in manual mode.
Hope this helps. Good luck!
__________________
Ernesto Many 35 mm and MF film cameras, some weird cameras... and nothing digital yet!
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-27-2005   #10
Kat
Registered User
 
Kat is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Philippines
Age: 38
Posts: 460
I'm leaning towards the Yashica GSN and the Minolta hi-matic 9...

Assuming I can get either, which would you guys think be better?

These are what I've gathered from some sites:

Sizes/weight of both are pretty near.

Minolta has only 1/4 shutter speed versus the 30 seconds of Yashica, but has full manual exposure control versus apperture priority of the latter.

Yashica, acc to one site (Matt's), isn't very durable compared to other brands. I haven't read anything about Minolta on this score.

According to the same site , the Yashica produces surprizingly beautiful, very sharp pics with good colors. No comments on Minolta's pic quality tho.

I'm wondering about batteries for both. Are there readily available substitutes that won't won't need any improvision?

Anything else you think I should know?

Last edited by Kat : 06-27-2005 at 12:00.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-27-2005   #11
RichardS
Registered User
 
RichardS is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Age: 90
Posts: 219
I don't know anything about batteries for the Minolta, but replacement batteries are available for the Yashica Electros. They originally took mercury batteries which are no longer available.

If you know the number of the batteries they originally took, go to http://www.photobattery.com/ and type the number in and it will show the replacement battery and the cost.

I don't agree with the statement about the Yashica Electros not being as durable as other models. If you want an Electro that gives you full control of aperture and shutter speed, go for the Minister D or the Lynx. There may be other Electros that give you complete control, but I know that those two models do.

Dick
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=525'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #12
Pherdinand
the snow must go on
 
Pherdinand's Avatar
 
Pherdinand is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: by the river called the Gender
Age: 42
Posts: 7,819
IMO, the ONLY disadvantage of the yashica electro35 GSN is that it does not give you control over (does not even tell you!) the shutter speed. Only "too slow" or "too fast". However if you want you can use the film speed dial to do some "exposure compensation". True, it's bigger than canonet ql17 but to me that's not a big difference.
OTOH, it has some advantages over the minolta hi-matic 9 and the canonet: loooong shutter speeds possible; battery only physically needed to be adapted, the vooltage does not matter; higher ISO setting; and some more.

I have begun my RF journey with a GSN. I got it for 45$ incl. 15$ shipping from the US. I have two of them now, as well as canonet ql17 GIII, canonet 28, minolta hi-matic 9 etc. I still use the GSN's the most from this category.
__________________
Happy New Year, Happy New Continent!
eye contact eye
My RFF Foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #13
Brian Sweeney
Registered User
 
Brian Sweeney's Avatar
 
Brian Sweeney is offline
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 14,912
The Hi-Matic 9 goes to 1 Second. The Yashica has electronics in it, and they can fail. The CDS cell is not covered by the lens cap as it is on the HM9. If it is stored for years exposed to light, that cell will deteriate. But after 30+ years, individual units of each model will fair better than others. I have had two GSN's give problems, and one GT working well. On one of them, the electronics "failed". My Hi-Matic 9 has required one CLA in 35 years, in 1980. A spring had to be replaced.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #14
Pherdinand
the snow must go on
 
Pherdinand's Avatar
 
Pherdinand is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: by the river called the Gender
Age: 42
Posts: 7,819
Sorry, i did not mean that the hi-matic 9 is bad . It's a good camera. It's just that so far, i prefer the GSN - regarding its features and handling.
I had to repair both the GSN (Pad of Death+light seals) and the hM9 (sticking shutter+light seals). They both were very cheap. They both can help you make excellent pictures.
__________________
Happy New Year, Happy New Continent!
eye contact eye
My RFF Foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #15
Pherdinand
the snow must go on
 
Pherdinand's Avatar
 
Pherdinand is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: by the river called the Gender
Age: 42
Posts: 7,819
By the way Brian, still couldn't figure out what the hi-matic 9 does when only one of the two rings (ap./sh.) is set to A. Seems totally random what I get.
__________________
Happy New Year, Happy New Continent!
eye contact eye
My RFF Foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #16
Rob
rangefinder camera magnet
 
Rob is offline
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Atlanta, Ga. USA
Age: 61
Posts: 477
Any of these cameras ar old as they are will need servicing, some more than others. Stick around here someone will offer one up in working condition. Dont worry about what it is.
For your budget see if you even like rangefinders first. Remember shooting 3 rolls of film with processing costs about $30.
__________________
<a href='http://www.rangefinderforum.com/photopost/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=367'>My Gallery</a>
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #17
Kat
Registered User
 
Kat is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Philippines
Age: 38
Posts: 460
I'm so confused! I really like the features of the Minolta Hi-Matic 9, but from the few sample pics I found, the colors don't seem as vibrant as the Yashieca. Is this really the case, for the Minolta users out there? That would be the make or break factor for me, regardless of features.

Though I guess you guys are right, ultimately the decision would have to take into consideration prices and availability...I do feel that these two (as well as the others everyone has so helpfully suggested are pretty good from what I've read.

I admit I'm not 100% I'd like using RFs, never encountered them before, haven't found any enthusiasts here in my country, that is why I'm getting my feet wet with the cheaper brands. I intend to make use of whatever I get, but not as often as you guys probably do, maybe one or two rolls every few months or so.

Last edited by Kat : 06-28-2005 at 12:44.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #18
Pherdinand
the snow must go on
 
Pherdinand's Avatar
 
Pherdinand is offline
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: by the river called the Gender
Age: 42
Posts: 7,819
I don't think that will be a problem.
So many factors to influence the colours...light in the scene, film type, film age, development, printing, scanning, etc
__________________
Happy New Year, Happy New Continent!
eye contact eye
My RFF Foolery
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2005   #19
solane
Registered User
 
solane's Avatar
 
solane is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 70
the one thing i've noticed about the hi-matics is that they meter using evaulative metering. it's the only camera i've encountered that lists the EV numbers in the viewfinder instead of aperture, shutter speed or some combination of the two with hi/low lights.

i bought two hi-matics and a GSN from ebay recently. all were around $30 and they all have things that need to be fixed in order for them to work properly. one hi-matic has a corroded battery compartment. the other hi-matics rangefinder in misaligned. and the GSN is a bit wonky (general term for needing $85 worth of repairs according to my local repair shop). they all need new seals.

the GSN requires an adapter to fit the modern non-mercury batteries. the hi-matic needs the wein air-cell batteries that replace the mercury PX625. IMHO, if you can get your hands on a canonet, i think that's the nicest and easiest-to-use fixed lens RF that i've used.

i don't want to dissuade you from trying a rangefinder but you may want to check out any local camera shops that sell used equipment or look for a local camera swap meet. at least you can handle the camera before you buy it and verify that things look okay. ebay is such a crap shoot.

as for lomo's -- the LC-A is a super, simple camera to use and has some manual controls but its expensive (new is about $150-$200), its no longer being produced and its fairly difficult to get them repaired (there's one guy in the US who's currently doing repairs and he's in brooklyn).
__________________
"Follow your inner moonlight;
don't hide the madness."*
-Allen Ginsberg
-------
:: snowangels
::

Last edited by solane : 06-28-2005 at 19:20.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-29-2005   #20
Kat
Registered User
 
Kat is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Philippines
Age: 38
Posts: 460
Thanks for the advice, I'm planning to check the local scene within the week and see if, by any chance there are vintages for sale as well as people who fix them. As for buying from folks in the forum, Richard Black mentioned he might have a GSN for sale, so that's an option I'm considering...

My problem buying here is, I myself am new, so I don't know which of the forumers would be best to buy from. I'm going through the feedback thread.

Yeah, I guess those ebay sellers usually just find their cameras in storage after many years, so even if they're "mint" condition they still need work. But it does get tempting when they throw in lots of extras like lenses and flash (but what use are those if the camera is broken ).

Last edited by Kat : 06-30-2005 at 03:51.
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-29-2005   #21
solane
Registered User
 
solane's Avatar
 
solane is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 70
the lenses and flashes and assorted extras that are often tacked onto ebay auction cameras may just increase the camera price for you. do you really want or need a flash? i have several and except for rare moments when i'm feeling "flashy" they stay in a drawer. especially since i reserve my RFs for black + white film mostly, i seldom find need for a flash.

just something to think about so you don't pay more at auction for something you won't necessarily need.

where are you located? there are forum members living all over the world and may have recommendations for places to look for used equipment or repair shops. i got great tips of places to look while i was in chicago recently from a fellow RFF member (TEZillman).
__________________
"Follow your inner moonlight;
don't hide the madness."*
-Allen Ginsberg
-------
:: snowangels
::
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-29-2005   #22
Kat
Registered User
 
Kat is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Philippines
Age: 38
Posts: 460
You're right, solane. The flash I thought could be of use for indoor shots, but I can always use my digicam for those, I suppose. I hear that the GSN does pretty well in low-light anyway. The lenses, I'm not sure are important, but I do use the macro and zoom a lot in my digicam.


I'm located in Manila, Philippines.

Last edited by Kat : 06-30-2005 at 03:44.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rangefinder Photography: Out of the Shadows and Into the Sunlight Alex Shishin Rangefinder Photography Discussion 45 10-11-2013 20:10
OT: Vintage cameras on TV/Movies bmattock Off Topic 64 03-09-2008 05:24
Vulcanite Replacement for Leica cameras Mark Hansen Other RF 5 11-25-2006 02:09
I Need Help From A Vintage Electircal Pro d30gaijin Rangefinder Photography Discussion 4 02-15-2005 18:04
Consolidation of Cameras Rich Silfver Rangefinder Photography Discussion 21 07-14-2004 21:57



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:38.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.