cycling and rangefinders....
Old 09-08-2005   #1
xcapekey
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cycling and rangefinders....

i just started cycling and would like to bring my RFs with me but am afraid of knocking out the alignment (already happened once)....anyone have any tips for riding with a leica or other RF on a bike?

how hard is it to recallibrate the RF patch? within the last 2 years of Leica ownership I've had to send each of the M's to be CLAd at least once, one of them has been in the repair shop 3 times....i'm not particularly hard on my cameras, i just use them a lot!!

thanks for any suggestions...
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Old 09-08-2005   #2
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Pardon me for asking, but do you fall down a lot? I just got back into bicycling as well (we are talking about bicycles, right?) and I don't do a lot of <i>extreme</i> things on mine. Jump a curb, once in a while. My biggest concern is where to tote the camera. I'm thinking of doing an Olympus XA on a lanyard around my neck or a belt pack of some kind.

Now that I'm cycling around my neighborhood, I'm seeing a lot of cyclers wearing helmets, with little mirrors attached, and they have these clips on their shoes, they can't get off the pedals, and they have bottled water delivery systems and whoo-boy. I have a Trek 50 and ride it upright, in jeans and a t-shirt. I can HEAR cars coming, see, so I don't need mini mirrors or helmets or backward-looking video cameras or SONAR and so on. And I don't check my heart rate every twenty seconds, for crying out loud. Just pump hard every so often and you get into good shape. You know it is working when you sweat and breathe hard for awhile. People take this stuff way too seriously.

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Old 09-08-2005   #3
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I work at a bike store for a friend of mine on Saturday, does that count? Accessories help keep us in business. We've a law here in Shaker Heights requiring bicycle riders to wear helmets. We'd like it more if they required two...

:-)

I gave up on rangefinders on the bicycle, and carry around a Voigtlander Vito- no rangefinder, guess and golly focus, and best of all, < $10. If I drop it, I feel bad.

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Old 09-08-2005   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdos2
I work at a bike store for a friend of mine on Saturday, does that count? Accessories help keep us in business. We've a law here in Shaker Heights requiring bicycle riders to wear helmets. We'd like it more if they required two...
They have such a law here, I'm told. People turn right on red from TWO lanes, for crying out loud. No way I'm wearing a bike helmet. They look stupid. And last I heard, it was my brain and I pay my own health insurance.

I bought my Trek at a local shop INSTEAD of Walmart and paid way over for it and a bike lock and some high-falootin' chain oil (see, sewing machine oil worked fine in my day, I guess chains aren't made well anymore), but I did it intentionally to support my local bike shop and help keep it in bidness. Danged if I'm going to pay more than double for the thing over Walmart prices. Double yes, more than double, I have to say whoa.

Quote:
I gave up on rangefinders on the bicycle, and carry around a Voigtlander Vito- no rangefinder, guess and golly focus, and best of all, > $10. If I drop it, I feel bad.
Pretty good idea, I'd say. Even a PnS would be a pretty good choice, yes?

Still, how do you knock the rangefinder out of whack on a bicycle? You guys drive over buildings and stuff?

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Old 09-08-2005   #5
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Sadly, I've experienced the "knock out of alignment," but not with a Leica, but a Zeiss- not hard to do, the mirror is on a stalk. That was my lesson.

See, in Cleveland here, we have this time of the year called "winter." It lasts nearly 8 months some years, and is known by the freezing of the water in the roads proper, making these things called holes, and causing rough rides, in spite of carbon fiber forks.

Um... Is it just hyperbole, or would you like to discuss what's going on with the chain, current thinking, and lubricant? Chains are better made now-a-days, but the current thinking is that keeping it as clean as reasonably possible is the best approach to chain maintenance. Basically one is going to have to replace that chain every 3,000 miles or so anyway, else pay the penalty of buying new casettes and so forth. That fancy chain lube is pretty cool stuff, but doesn't like to get or stay where it can do Good Things, that is, bear the load of the tiny rollers and bushings. It gets pressed right out, and isn't like a motorcycle chain where each link has seals preventing the lubricant from leaving. Anything that leaves oil residue becomes a perfect suspension point for dust and dirt- much of that being silicon based and becomes a good grinding compound. In other words, you are damned if you lubricate, damned if you don't.
The old chains performed similarly, but were much more heavily built- they had to be, as the gearing systems were wider, and needed chains to take that load. We still sell chains like that. They last just as long as they ever did.
Bicycle technology has made long advances, but like everything else, one has to pay money to buy into it. The same old cheap stuff, out of round (and overly machine assembled) bearings are available for the same price they were in the 80's, meaning that bikes have gotten cheaper over time. On the other hand, carbon fiber forks, or rear stays, with a light frame and good shifting componentry is going to cost ya. Oh, by the way, it'll use a chain that'll suffer if you use a machine oil, just as a cheap one will...

But those are just the words of an overworked bicycle mechanic. We see lots of those $100 Wall-Mart specials come in. Impacted bearings, heavy steel wheels with loose (from the factory!) spokes, and kids that insist on using oilers on the chains (more is better!!!).

Just like cameras, spend the money now and get something that can be maintained to last, or don't and fix it all the time.

Personally, I wear a helmet to help avert a death or debilitating injury because of people that like to make right hand turns from two lanes over... With no signal. Then again, I also ride my motorcycle without one sometimes, and have had dropped the bike a couple times, grateful that my head didn't hit the pavement.

Stuff happens. The helmet law is usually enforced by our bike cops. They have been riding all day and are on heavy Police Treks- they aren't a match for a decent road bike.

:-)
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Old 09-08-2005   #6
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Bill, no helmet law for adult bicyclists in Toronto, helmet law for gas powered bikes in Toronto. Now the good part. Not wearing a helmet in this city anyway is rolling dice and coming up snake eyes. Three weeks ago a cabbie decided he was going to drive thru me because he was in a hurry. Drove me into a steel lamp post and I broke my hand. I had a helmet on. Glad I did.

And it's not just cabbies in this city, many drivers are even more agressive. So helmets are sold. Finally there is now direct medical proof / evidence that head injuries result in dementia in late life. So I forget why I'm wearing one but when I recall I'll write you. ;-)

Have fun in Gettysburg.

cheers, Jan
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Old 09-08-2005   #7
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Although I haven't had the time to ride much since we moved to Israel 4 months ago, I'm typically a pretty regular rider. I ususally cycle 3 to 4 times a week, between 20 to 50 miles each ride.

For a camera I have a Minox GT-X which is easy to take along. I haven't yet tried with a rangefinder, but my feeling is that a backpack would provide the best protection from road vibration which could knock th finder out of line. There are also some some nice rack/bag set-ups that attach to your seatpost and extend backwards over the rear wheel. They are large enough to carry most any camera, but may transmit too much road vibration.

As for helmets, law or no law, not wearing won is crazy. At some point you will fall. A buddy of mine was almost run over by a sweet little old lady in our neighborhood when she made a right turn without looking. Fortunately for him, the helmet hit the poll and not his bare head! A teenage girl who was riding around our neighborhood with friends took a fall without a helmet and bashed her head. She's very lucky that there does not appear to be any long term damage. However, she has total amnesia of the event, and has even forgoten certain words and other memories.

Oh, and as for clip-on pedals. They are definitely not necessary for recreational type riding. But, let me tell you that the difference in performance between riding without them versus riding with them is tremendous. They actually allow you to apply force to the pedals on both the down stroke and the upstroke. However, they are not so easy to learn to use (actually, it's the un-clipping part that takes a bit of practice) and, do not even attempt to use them without a helmet. I still have fond memories of the first few times I stopped at a traffic light clipped to the bike, and could not put my feet down because they were firmly attached to the bike (yes, I tipped over).

All the best,

Michael
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Old 09-08-2005   #8
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I cycle to and from work daily. Part of the route is rattling over paved roads in the dinky little town where I live. I always carry a camera in a small back pack (along with my lunchbox and some rain-clothing). Often it's a Bessa-T. The rangefinder alignment hasn't moved a hair from where it was the day I bought it.

But then again, we don't have to wear helmets when cycling over here in Holland. Could that have something to do with it?
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Old 09-08-2005   #9
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I do a lot of riding on my old Schwinn and on a road bike, when I am commuting. I carry cameras, either in a backpack or slung over my shoulder, and have never had any problems with the rangefinders on any of my cameras going out of alignment. The only way I could see that happening is if you were carrying your camera in a saddle bag or handlebar bag, where the camera would be directly affected by vibration.

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Old 09-08-2005   #10
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Or if you fell off your bike and landed on your bag with said camera inside.. That would hurt. I took my Bessa R and an SLR with me on a bike ride a little while ago and managed to scratch the Bessa R top plate somehow. A bit of padding on the inside wont hurt to keep things looking good
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Old 09-08-2005   #11
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Fuji bike, backpack, Leica inside
No helmet - not required here, and the drivers are used to bicycles. We also have many bicycle paths, so it's not that dangerous.
OTOH, the backpack has padding - there's a smaller camera bag inside, with one camera and sometimes one extra lens (or light meter, if the camera is unmetered).

Perhaps we could start posting photos in this thread?
Not necessarily RF photos, like in "Camera and Coffee" thread?

I'll try to get a shot of myself on the bike soon - but I'll need my wife to take that shot

Denis
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Old 09-09-2005   #12
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Being Dutch, I cycle to work daily like Peter. However, here in Glasgow it's a bit more dangerous than in The Netherlands. Dangerous car drivers certainly make me wake up in the morning...

I would also say that carrying your camera in a backpack is safer than using panniers / bags on a rack on the back. I normally carry my laptop and digital p&s in a padded backpack, with a rain cover to keep it dry (this is Scotland...). However we often cycle from Glasgow to Stirling, a nice ride of about 4 hours through the hills. I then carry my slr in a heavily padded CCS bag, inside one of these water-proof roll-top panniers. With some spare clothes or lunch for extra shock absorbance, this works fine. I guess a rangefinder would survive this as well. Ortlieb make the best waterproof bags: www.ortlieb.com (including roll-top camera bags!)

Cycling is certainly better than driving for spotting good photo ops and stopping everywhere. But walking is even better.
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Old 09-09-2005   #13
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Bill get a decent helmet...one fall is all it takes for a serious injury. Todays helmets are very comfortable and cool. Mine has a visor on it that works good too. I bike on paths and offroad where a fall can happen anytime. Good that you got a quality bike from your bike shop. I just repaired two cheap ones for a freind...cheap junk with parts missing from the brake design! I ride a specialized and have a pouch behind my seat or I have a bag on the handlebars to carry a camera well padded. Just a point and shoot is enough, not gonna risk anything nice.
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Old 09-09-2005   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jan normandale
Bill, no helmet law for adult bicyclists in Toronto, helmet law for gas powered bikes in Toronto. Now the good part. Not wearing a helmet in this city anyway is rolling dice and coming up snake eyes. Three weeks ago a cabbie decided he was going to drive thru me because he was in a hurry. Drove me into a steel lamp post and I broke my hand. I had a helmet on. Glad I did.

And it's not just cabbies in this city, many drivers are even more agressive. So helmets are sold. Finally there is now direct medical proof / evidence that head injuries result in dementia in late life. So I forget why I'm wearing one but when I recall I'll write you. ;-)

Have fun in Gettysburg.

cheers, Jan
Jan, sorry to hear what happened to you! I think we have different situations. I am riding around in my neighborhood - no cabs, no trucks, no commercial traffic, no traffic signals. Just tooling around the streets. As to helmets - I agree they're a good idea and protect your noggin. My objection? First - I rode a bicycle growing up, there was no such thing as a helmet. Somehow I avoided dying. Second - I object to governments telling me what I must do because it is good for me. If the rights of others were involved, fine - their right to be safe trumps my right to do as I wish. But if I fail to wear a helmet, it harms no one but me. So it is my bidness and that's that.

Truly am sorry to hear about your hand, though!

Best Regards,

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Old 09-09-2005   #15
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Ah, my two favorite subjects...cycling and photography!

I never bring my RFs when I ride because I find them too fiddly for fast picture-taking. However, I did take my Bessa R along when I crewed on the 2005 RAAM and the 2005 UMCA 24-hour championships and it worked great despite some rough treatment.

So I'd say that unless you're doing BMX or dirt-jumping any RF camera can be brought on a bike ride w/out worrying about upsetting the RF alignment. I'd be more careful with keeping the lenses clean than I would with the RF system.

My current film-based cycling camera is my non-RF XA2, which can slip into my back jersey pocket. I put it inside a plastic sandwich bag first, to protect it from sweat and spilled water. Sometimes I bring my Canon A40 digital and stuff it in my panniers.

OT issues:

I've been riding for almost 20 years, spent two seasons working in a bike shop and crewed for several ultra-marathon cycling races. As to the helmet debate, I say it's every rider's decision to make for him or her self. Do I ride with one? Not always. Do I think this is foolish? Yes. Am I going to tell another rider to wear a helmet? No way (however, I did do so for kids under 14 when I worked in the bike store -- to comply with New Jersey law). Grownups can make these decisions just fine without any input from me or "the guvmint". But if you get hurt you'd better be prepared to accept responsibility for your decision.

A comment on Bill's bike buying experience. He did good by buying his bike from a local bike shop ("LBS") as opposed to a big-box store like WalMart. I won't get into the various social and political reasons why I don't shop at WalMart, but I would never, ever buy a bicycle from them (or any big-box retailer) under any circumstances:

1. The bikes they sell tend to be equipped with inferior, non-standard parts. Use of ferrous metals in corrosion-prone parts is common. Many LBS lack spare parts for these "disoposable bikes" and some LBS will refuse to repair them

2. The frame dropouts are sometimes press-fit rather than welded. Not good for long-term use (or safety).

3. Bikes sold at big-box stores are sometimes assemebled by people with no cycling knowlege. Brakes, wheels and derailers often have to be re-adjusted by the rider after only a few days of use.

4. Big-box stores offer no warranty or repair service on the bikes they sell. If a part fails, don't try to bring your $119 special back to WalMart.

Most bikes sold at your LBS have extended or lifetime warranties on the frames. Key parts can be easily replaced (sometimes for free). Also, most LBS I know give one or two years of free maintenance service with every new bike purchase. At approximately $35 for a LBS "basic tuneup", figure your purchase price includes about $70 in free labor for the first two years of ownership. Furthermore, LBS bikes are assembled and checked by professionals and not hourly-wage workers with little interest in cycling.

Bill, you may have spent more in the short run but, trust me, you will have your Trek for years to come and you've SAVED money in the long run. Plus you helped a local merchant. Nicely done. Some freewheeling karma is coming your way soon.
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Old 09-09-2005   #16
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This is not completely on-topic, but I just came back from Copenhagen yesterday, and was amazed at the amount of bike-riders there - sometimes there seem to be more bikes than cars on the road, they have got great, wide bike paths, the car drivers seem to be very considerate and laid-back (here in Vienna, it is an open war between bikers and car drivers, with many people getting injured - mostly the bikers...), but then that might just be the general Danish attitude.
Also, I saw all kinds of weird (yet practical) bikes - ones that have a platform for e.g. carrying a case of beer between the rider and the front-wheel, and quite common, three wheelers (two wheels in front, one in the back, some of those even use the rear wheel for steering), with large boxes between the two front wheels, mainly used to carry one or two kids (but they could also hold a huge box of camera equipment, to get this on-topic again).
And lots of bikes with nice Brooks leather saddles, parked openly in the streets (here,those saddles would be stolen within 5 minutes...).


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Old 09-09-2005   #17
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Sometimes cycling and photographing is a great combination, where else can you get to stop your car whenever you wanted to take a picture? Seriously though, I have put my Bessa R in my backpack and it has been fine. Never considered putting it in the panniers though, that would result in way too much vibration. Anyhow, I've dropped my Bessa R while walking before - someone bumped into me on the street and whacked it out of my hand, and it must have dropped 3 feet onto the pavement. I was really upset, and the bottom (plastic) was all scratched and one side looked wonky. I managed to push it back, and apart from the scratches, the rangefinder still works 100%. So does the lens. So I don't feel that nervous about subjecting the Bessa R to a little bit of abuse anymore.

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Old 09-09-2005   #18
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Since February I've garaged my Santana Superlight and have been riding a Trikke 12 Roadster (see trikke.com). Done the Acura Bike Tour on it in Los Angeles and am working towards the Rosarito to Ensenada ride this month and then the Long Beach Marathon in October. Lots of fun and a great full body workout! I've taken my CL/40 with me with no problems since it's usually in a backpack. I've even taken my Canon 1D Mark II with a 70-200 IS, 17-40 and a 1.4x teleconverter in a Lowepro backpack. That's a heavy load on a HPV! But most of the time I'm bringing a small digital PnS that fits in my pocket. I haven't brought my MP on any rides yest but I assume that it can withstand a least as much abuse as the CL.
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Old 09-09-2005   #19
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Hi

Yes, two of my favorite themes also. Does anyone knows some model of camelbak or other brand of backpak that can hold some water and for example a canonet? I've tried to search amongst the camelbak brand and i haven't found a model that suit my needs (camera and water, of course).
Greetings to you all!
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Old 09-09-2005   #20
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Hi Luf,

I assume the Canonet is about the size of an Leica M? The Camelbak Blowfish is plenty big. It even expands to hold more junk than you'd want. It also holds 3 liters of liquid for long rides. But it doesn't offer any padding to protect the contents of the pack so make sure you have something cushy to put your camera in.
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Old 09-09-2005   #21
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ha...great to see lots of photocyclists on the forum i've recently got into cycling and am putting on about 20 miles a day on my schwinn continental....i figure if i can ride it up hills at a decent clip, upgrading to a lighter bike (anything lighter than 40lbs should be a piece of cake ....i promised myself that if the day i could bike up to the top of signal hill without stopping, is the day i'll treat my self to a new ride....

anyway, back to cameras...i suppose bungeeing my domke to the rear rack probably wasn't the best idea....i'll try strapping it tight to my body and add some padding to see if it will work out better...

what would the bike equivalent of a leica be ?
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Old 09-09-2005   #22
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how about a new word for biking and rfing at the same time.... leitzycle....or beica....ok...i have too much time on my hands
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Old 09-09-2005   #23
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"Beika" = Rivendell Rambouillet? It costs about the same as an M body, anyway.

(...I'd like to be the second person known to use the term "Beika". )

Bikes are like cameras in one way: Both industires are driven by hype-marketing. A fancy bike won't make you a better rider just as a fancy camera won't make you a better photographer.
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Old 09-09-2005   #24
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Hi Bill and Roman

like all of us here we were once kids. Hopefully we still are. I used no helmet and was fine. Now the world is different where I cycle.

I understand, you don't like being told what to do regarding your own person (ie Big Guvmint sez... you must do 'whatever') It's yer choice and it still is here too. Once upon a time hockey players didn't wear helmets, goalies didn't wear masks. Times changed in their game, and they have changed where I ride a bike. If I ride in the city, I wear one. If I am on a bike path in a valley or lake front where cars are not permitted I don't wear one. It feels great.

Still there is more of the attitude Roman describes in Vienna towards cyclists here in Toronto too. So I wear one. Maybe I’ll move to Copenhagen. Cycling, Aquavit, black coffee, pastries…. Sounds good to me.

Bill thanks for the thoughts, I’m going back to the clinic about the ‘hand’ today. I may have to have it broken again.. I don’t like this.

Jan
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Old 09-09-2005   #25
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Leica M in a courier bag every day on the bike, off-road as well (but not mountain biking). Year later, no problems.

I guess your body'll absorb the shocks, so anything in a bag is riding on suspension. Just as you can carry eggs in a shoulder bag and they're okay, but you glue the box to your handlebars and SPLAT! Panniers, then, might be a bit dodgy.

My cameras get jolted more when I bash them into things from the strap.
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Old 09-09-2005   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xcapekey
ha...great to see lots of photocyclists on the forum i've recently got into cycling and am putting on about 20 miles a day on my schwinn continental....i figure if i can ride it up hills at a decent clip, upgrading to a lighter bike (anything lighter than 40lbs should be a piece of cake ....i promised myself that if the day i could bike up to the top of signal hill without stopping, is the day i'll treat my self to a new ride....

anyway, back to cameras...i suppose bungeeing my domke to the rear rack probably wasn't the best idea....i'll try strapping it tight to my body and add some padding to see if it will work out better...

what would the bike equivalent of a leica be ?
If your Continental is an old Chicago Schwinn don't sell it short. I have and have had plenty of fancy bikes, plus lots of Schwinns, and have developed a healthy respect for the cushy ride, rugged nature and decent geometry of those old electro forged frames.

If you are looking for the Leica of bikes I'd sugguest any older lug framed road bike with down tube shifters, or bar end shifters if you prefer them, and a well broken in Brooks saddle. Sure, yuppie, Lance Armstrong poseurs will laugh at the lack of Carbon Fiber and fancy index shifting, but as a rangefinder fan you should be used to that sort of thing

Richie
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Old 09-09-2005   #27
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yeah..it's a chicago schwinn....saw it a flea market sale and it's bright yellow was calling to me i had never ridden a bike with drops before or the old friction shifters but it was just too neat looking....the ride is pretty smooth and boy does it bomb down hills...i've changed the seat out to an anatomically corrected one and changed the cables, tubes and tires...rides great

like my cameras i wanted something that was rugged and was vintage or had some history, instead of something that looked toooo new...

anyone suggest a good small strap bag for riding? i heard the patagonia atom is pretty good...
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Old 09-09-2005   #28
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I've participated in New York City's Five Boro Bike Tour twice and carried rangefinders on both occasions... It is a 42 mile tour
through New York City’s five boroughs, and with 30,000+ participants, is the largest recreational cycling event in the
U.S.

It is a great opportunity to ride through the city and see views that normal New
York traffic won't let you stop and see (photograph)..

On my first tour through New York, I carried a Konica Auto S2. It was small enough to carry across shoulder/chest e or carry in a small handle bar bag..

Second time around, I took a Mamiya 6. Sometimes the Mamiya was strapped around my chest/shoulders for
shots while cycling and other times I stored it in a well insulated saddle bag...

Didn't have any problems with rangefinder misalignment on either trip.

The World Trade Center shot was from the '96 tour..

my 2 cents worth..

Rick
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Old 09-10-2005   #29
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Get yourself a nice Crumpler or similar messenger bag... I always carry my rangefinders in my courier bag, that way my body soaks up the vibrations and the camera suffers no knocks.

Of course, I don't fall off very often!

But don't carry too much in it, it hurts your shoulders
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Old 09-10-2005   #30
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Second to the suggestion of the messenger bag. I've used the small and medium-sized Timbuk2 bags to carry camera gear while on (and off) the bike.

Some courier bags lack dividers so be careful about what other items you pack with your camera. Also, the waterproof bags do a nice job of keeping water out but they will also keep liquids INSIDE so be careful when you put bottled water or other drinks in with your camera gear.
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Old 11-02-2005   #31
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well...thought i'd give an update on my findings after cycling for the last three months, i've managed to knock each of my leica's (3 of them) out of whack...ugh...i tried wrapping them in domke wraps, then putting it in a bag, then putting it in my pannier...didn't work...i tried wrapping them in two t-shirts, putting it in a domke FXB bag that then goes in a novara handlebar bag...didn't work...

i've recently gotten hold of an xpan and am paranoid, so i tried wrapping the cams in bubble wrap, a t-shirt, the domke in the handlebar bag...works, but takes five minutes to get to....

the long and short of it is i found a small well cushioned crumpler messenger bag that seems to work well....i just shorten the strap so it's snug to my upper body...the combination of my body and the suspension of the strap seem to absorb shock the best...

just in case you were wondering

speaking of bikes, my new bike arrives tommorrow! i ordered a Bike Friday...an orange New World Tourist....basically a high performance folding bike with drop bars..sorta like the leica of bikes, in terms of craftsmanship and size
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Old 11-03-2005   #32
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That Bike Friday is going to be a treat! They are very, very nice machines. Did yours come with the cargo trailer? If so, I would avoid carrying your RFs in it.

Enjoy!


PS - Has anyone else noticed that folding bikes seem to be gaining popularity in the USA? Trek, Giant and Breezer all have new models in the last three or so years, in addition to the current models from Bike Friday, Brompton, Dahon and others. Uh, oh...I may have a case of bike GAS coming on....
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Old 11-03-2005   #33
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Hi,

I've just spotted this thread thanks to the recent posts. First time aroud I missed it because I was cycling with a Leica in China!

I did 1000km in 10 days, sometimes over some really, really rough stuff with my gear in a handlebar bag. It had some light padding, and then some bubblewrap, and the cameras/lenses were in thin leather cases. I have to say that none of the gear took any damage (at least as far as I have recognised). I took a Leica CL with the 40mm Summicron, 90mm Elmar, and a CV 21mm. A rangefinder was simply the only option for a kit like this on a trip like that. I also brought a Yashica T4 that I loaded with some of that new-fangled colour film.

Two years ago before I discovered RFs, I would have taken my Contax 139 with 28mm and 50mm lenses. The 135mm would have been too big and would have stayed at home, but the kit would still have been much heaver than the one I ended up taking. The trip was mainly about the cycling, but nowadays I don't really like to spend any of my leisure time doing something where photography can't be a sideline. Rangefinder photography and cycling go well together. This trip proved it for me. Another week or so and the scanning will be finished, and I'll post some shots on this site.

Robin.
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Old 11-08-2005   #34
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here are some pics of my new two-wheeled leica case
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