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Zeiss Contax Forum for the classic Zeiss Contax I, II, III, IIa, IIIa , G series, and if you want to push it, the nice Contax point and shoots. Some spill over from the Kievs, the Soviet copy of the Contax II/III can also be expected. Plus the ONLY production camera ever made in classic Zeiss Contax Rangefinder mount WITH TTL metering ... the Voigtlander Bessa R2C.

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Contax G1 and flash
Old 07-27-2012   #1
froyd
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Contax G1 and flash

Anybody knows what flash voltage can be handled by the Contax G1? In other words will I fry it if I attach a 283 or similar to it?
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Old 09-25-2012   #2
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just giving this a bump...just in case!
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Old 09-25-2012   #3
sevo
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I would not risk it in your place - the Contax flashes I own have trigger voltages no higher than their DC battery voltage (5-6V).

Indeed I'd declare the 283 unsafe on every TTL flash capable camera with multi-contact hotshoe - its voltage is outrageously high. Even if the trigger circuit itself can stand the voltage, many trivial accidents (from moisture to a mishap while inserting/pulling the flash) can feed trigger voltage into the TTL circuit, which almost certainly will be toast after contact with 120+V.
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Old 09-26-2012   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevo View Post
I would not risk it in your place - the Contax flashes I own have trigger voltages no higher than their DC battery voltage (5-6V).

Indeed I'd declare the 283 unsafe on every TTL flash capable camera with multi-contact hotshoe - its voltage is outrageously high. Even if the trigger circuit itself can stand the voltage, many trivial accidents (from moisture to a mishap while inserting/pulling the flash) can feed trigger voltage into the TTL circuit, which almost certainly will be toast after contact with 120+V.
ugh! you definitely scared me off the old vivitar!
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Old 09-26-2012   #5
Jerry Thirsty
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Keep in mind you can also use the flashes from the Contax SLRs on the G series (e.g. the TLA 280 and 360). They tend to be pretty cheap.
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Old 09-26-2012   #6
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Originally Posted by Jerry Thirsty View Post
Keep in mind you can also use the flashes from the Contax SLRs on the G series (e.g. the TLA 280 and 360). They tend to be pretty cheap.
Right. I have a TLA280 (nice - tilts, zooms and has daughter flash and 2nd curtain sync) and a TLA30 (old, but with a bit more oomph) Both work nicely on the G's and can be used with Contax wired multi-flash TTL cables.
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Old 09-26-2012   #7
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How exactly to I determine the voltage of a flash? I looked at the manual of a flash I wanted to use, but I could not find that specific information.

Attached is the PDF of the manual

http://www.cameramanuals.org/flashes...ic_ftd5600.pdf
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Old 09-26-2012   #8
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How exactly to I determine the voltage of a flash?
The trigger voltage (at any rate for flashes that are critically high voltage) is a DC voltage between the ground and trigger contacts when the flash has fully charged up. It can be measured with a plain voltmeter. If you have one around, use a high voltage capable DSO, as that will also catch out peaks or AC.
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Old 09-26-2012   #9
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Thanks Svevo. So, it would seem the flash voltage is not a plainly advertised spec. Sounds dangerous. I wonder how many people bother with doing the test you suggested.

Also, will using a PC cord eliminate the risk?
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Old 09-26-2012   #10
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So, it would seem the flash voltage is not a plainly advertised spec.
No. There is a ISO definition of 24V, but that only came decades after electric flash triggers had already been established. If violated the preceding practice, which used anything between 60V (bulb batteries) and grid voltage (by local standards of the maker), and it was not future proof either - 24V is inherently unsafe for digital circuits (whose safe limits are somewhere between 3V and 15V). So the ISO standard may well be the least used trigger voltage around.

PC sync makes no difference, by the way, the actual trigger system is the same. But it is free from the risk of the trigger contact sliding across any of the digital ports of the TTL system.
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