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View Poll Results: Is Street Photography Dead?
Yes 82 20.55%
No 317 79.45%
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Old 03-04-2013   #81
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was it ever alive?
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Dead?
Old 03-04-2013   #82
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Question Dead?

Absolutely not! I just had one of my photos selected for a gallery show where landscapes predominated.
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Old 03-04-2013   #83
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Ditto, and props to Keith for making me look.

I've watched this scenario very up close, twice. You are brave to document this, but then it may be therapeutic.

One day at a time. . . .

I'm glad someone took the trouble to take a look at those images.

The irony of discovering those amazing photographs of that woman in this thread is not lost on me ... or you I suspect!
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Old 03-04-2013   #84
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I'm glad someone took the trouble to take a look at those images.

The irony of discovering those amazing photographs of that woman in this thread is not lost on me ... or you I suspect!
Amazing and powerful images for sure.
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Old 03-04-2013   #85
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Originally Posted by Carterofmars View Post
Is Street Photography Dead?

Sadly, the way I see it - yes.

No, you can go and shoot streets all day long, and it does not even cost you much as we are shooting digital... But the main purpose of street photo is lost, I think. People, at least in US, besides few cities like NY, Chicago maybe... they don't live ion streets, they don't spend life time on streets. They just go somewhere. They live in malls, houses in burbs and restaurants.

Another thing, perhaps even more important: what breakthrugh in photo can you get on street now, that has not been already done?
So, yes. Street photo in it's classical form is dead, I beleave.
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Old 03-04-2013   #86
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It's only dead to you, if you lose interest or have no interest in that Genre' anymore...

SP Lives, and many young talented street photographers are making it their own....
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Old 03-04-2013   #87
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Sadly, the way I see it - yes.

No, you can go and shoot streets all day long, and it does not even cost you much as we are shooting digital... But the main purpose of street photo is lost, I think. People, at least in US, besides few cities like NY, Chicago maybe... they don't live ion streets, they don't spend life time on streets. They just go somewhere. They live in malls, houses in burbs and restaurants.

Another thing, perhaps even more important: what breakthrugh in photo can you get on street now, that has not been already done?
So, yes. Street photo in it's classical form is dead, I beleave.
...really? NYC has to be one of the hardest places to shoot street photography in a sense. Anyone who has been there for longer than 3 days knows that people just walk from one shop to the next. Nothing really ALIVE happens on the streets in manhattan. It's a tourist city with hollow tourist characters and situations. Unless you REALLY know the city, hang in the hoods of harlem, drink with the bums at Coney Island, explore the alleyways of the lower east side....you're pretty much just getting people walking to work, going shopping or looking up.

Granted, you get the occasional character or group on the streets of Manhattan. But for the most part, you need to give up the white-washed comfort zones and really explore outside the rich/middle class areas to get anything truly great.
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Old 03-04-2013   #88
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Originally Posted by jordanstarr View Post
...really? NYC has to be one of the hardest places to shoot street photography in a sense. Anyone who has been there for longer than 3 days knows that people just walk from one shop to the next. Nothing really ALIVE happens on the streets in manhattan. It's a tourist city with hollow tourist characters and situations. Unless you REALLY know the city, hang in the hoods of harlem, drink with the bums at Coney Island, explore the alleyways of the lower east side....you're pretty much just getting people walking to work, going shopping or looking up.

Granted, you get the occasional character or group on the streets of Manhattan. But for the most part, you need to give up the white-washed comfort zones and really explore outside the rich/middle class areas to get anything truly great.
Doesn't this confirm my point?
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Old 03-04-2013   #89
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Doesn't this confirm my point?
.....my apologies...must be the canada/usa language barrier...I thought you were saying that ny and chicago were the only cities where street photography was alive.
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Old 03-04-2013   #90
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Thanks for the link! Very well written in my opinion. Offers really good insight....Street photography is not dead you just have to dig deeper to find the good stuff...

Quote:
Originally Posted by gns View Post
Maybe it is dead. Has anyone practiced it at the level of a Frank or a Winogrand? Has anyone since the seventies created anything as vital with it? If they did, was there an audience?
Photography took a different turn in the eighties, away from the documentary style. It was a turn away from what interested me about the medium, but I understand that people need change. Something new.

If it is dead, maybe that is the best time to do it.

Here is an interesting related essay by Paul Graham that you might want to read...
http://www.paulgrahamarchive.com/writings_by.html
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Old 03-04-2013   #91
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Thanks for the link! Very well written in my opinion. Offers really good insight....Street photography is not dead you just have to dig deeper to find the good stuff...

Indeed! In just about any genre the most vital stuff is being made (in the) "underground".
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Old 03-04-2013   #92
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where can i find this underground in edmonton?
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Old 03-04-2013   #93
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Wait a second.... Isn't "street photography" really just 'photography'? The thread was a good read but IMHO, pointless. Either you're interested in photography or not.
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Old 03-04-2013   #94
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I had a friend who was a genuine street photographer back in the late seventies early eighties. He worked for Boral who was a supplier of asphalt for roads. His job was to fly to from various locations around Australia photographing road laying results for their records.

OK ... so he was a 'road photographer!'
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Old 03-04-2013   #95
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where can i find this underground in edmonton?

Good question. I stopped chasing that dragon awhile a go! Don't you go to Whyte ave. every weekend? Should be telling me!
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Old 03-04-2013   #96
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I think it is more about doing street photography, but through focussing to what we do we ignore the others doing street photography too. Frequently, when I get my mind out of snapshot hunting, I see others doing the same.
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Old 03-05-2013   #97
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As a countryside dweller, I find the city a fascinating place and a welcome distraction. The sooner I finish the repairs to my campervan, the sooner I can get to one.
Whereas I live in a city (London), and am sick to death of it...
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Old 03-05-2013   #98
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"Street" photography can happen anywhere.

Here's a link to a picture in my RFF Gallery of the Little Mermaid statue in Copenhagen. I'm proud of it. I think the composition is good, and I haven't seen any other picture of the Little Mermaid like it. For me, this is street photography, alive and well.
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http://www.rangefinderforum.com/rffg...8728.SEQ.0.jpg
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Old 03-05-2013   #99
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Depends on where you live.
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Old 03-05-2013   #100
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Originally Posted by jordanstarr View Post
Granted, you get the occasional character or group on the streets of Manhattan. But for the most part, you need to give up the white-washed comfort zones and really explore outside the rich/middle class areas to get anything truly great.
Because we all know that the average rich/middle class person can never be interesting... More close minded, stereotypical bull**** really.

Seems to me that some people think street photography always has to be witty and conform to the decisive moment. That reminds me of people who think that music is all about craming a thousand notes per second into a song for it to be good. Sometimes, playing three chords works.
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Old 03-05-2013   #101
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Depends on where you live.
Depends on :

- where you live
- where you are
- what is in the lens field of view
- which mental compositions you've got in mind
- what your perception of things is
- which poetry you can create using what is in front of your lens
- which story you can tell,

and so on.

I fully agree with sleepyhead to say that not only random shots of people in large cities streets are "street photography". Very beautiful shot of the Little Mermaid BTW (but afterall this isn't a shot of the Little Mermaid actually, this is "something else"... and it's great).
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Old 03-05-2013   #102
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Is street photography dead? Yes.

With best regards.

Pfreddee(Stephe
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Old 03-05-2013   #103
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Is street photography dead? No.

With best regards.

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Old 03-05-2013   #104
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Because we all know that the average rich/middle class person can never be interesting... More close minded, stereotypical bull**** really.

Seems to me that some people think street photography always has to be witty and conform to the decisive moment. That reminds me of people who think that music is all about craming a thousand notes per second into a song for it to be good. Sometimes, playing three chords works.
Please, post three good photos. You've made more than 10,000 posts.
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Old 03-05-2013   #105
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Nikon Coolpix A, a DX format fixed lens (28mm) compact, the digital version of Ricoh GRV has been announced. I bet Moriyama had something to do with this camera being launched by Nikon.

A perfect street photography camera.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/03...t-F2-8-compact
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Old 03-05-2013   #106
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Please, post three good photos. You've made more than 10,000 posts.
You can look at my flickr. If those aren't good enough, then I can't help you. Not sure what your point is other than to make me feel as though I'm not worthy of posting because you deemed my photography crap. I've noticed that you aren't showing yours...
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Old 03-05-2013   #107
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Personally, I'd love for street photography to die so I could be one of the few people doing street photography... So, yes, street photography is dead, please get off the streets so real street photographer can work in peace without having to leave an area because a pack of some photography club newbies are crowding his favorite corner and scaring the game.
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Old 03-05-2013   #108
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...really? NYC has to be one of the hardest places to shoot street photography in a sense. Anyone who has been there for longer than 3 days knows that people just walk from one shop to the next. Nothing really ALIVE happens on the streets in manhattan. It's a tourist city with hollow tourist characters and situations. Unless you REALLY know the city, hang in the hoods of harlem, drink with the bums at Coney Island, explore the alleyways of the lower east side....you're pretty much just getting people walking to work, going shopping or looking up.

Granted, you get the occasional character or group on the streets of Manhattan. But for the most part, you need to give up the white-washed comfort zones and really explore outside the rich/middle class areas to get anything truly great.

with respect, i couldn't disagree more. new york is a visual circus, full of authentic activity. i'm not sure that shooting hoods, bums or alleys (and, fwiw, there really aren't alleys anymore on the lower east side) is necessary for "street" photography. also, fwiw, i hate the term "street photography" since it conjures some false equation of street life with the poor and disenfranchised. street life - in a city with an active public life - is for everyone, and no city in the country has more democratic streets than new york and, outside of san francisco, more dramatic settings.

it's funny, my advice to you would have been to get off of fifth avenue a little more, and then i read your last paragraph again. i sense a little reverse snobbery, and forgive me if i'm wrong. look for the good, my friend. look for the good.
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Old 03-05-2013   #109
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No, digital is dead for me
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Old 03-05-2013   #110
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Personally, I'd love for street photography to die so I could be one of the few people doing street photography... So, yes, street photography is dead, please get off the streets so real street photographer can work in peace without having to leave an area because a pack of some photography club newbies are crowding his favorite corner and scaring the game.
So what got you into street photography ?
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Old 03-05-2013   #111
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Everyone with a phone is now a photographer.

I think the classic HCB/Winogrand definition of "street" photography had its auteur moment when it was new and the cameras capable of capturing the "decisive moment" were relatively expensive and limited to a few. Back when they did their work the urban street was still a minority landscape in a still (mostly) very rural world (rural being both a physical and mental construct).

Now streets are everywhere. Ubiquitousness diminished newness.

Video killed the radio star.
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Old 03-05-2013   #112
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"Is street photography dead"? Of course it isn't but a lot of streets have changed. Today's Phnom Penh resembles downtown New York 150 years ago. If you are looking for these kind of pictures...travel.
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Old 03-05-2013   #113
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Life goes on, it's up the individual to interpret it.
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Old 03-05-2013   #114
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Everyone with a phone is now a photographer.

I think the classic HCB/Winogrand definition of "street" photography had its auteur moment when it was new and the cameras capable of capturing the "decisive moment" were relatively expensive and limited to a few. Back when they did their work the urban street was still a minority landscape in a still (mostly) very rural world (rural being both a physical and mental construct).

Now streets are everywhere. Ubiquitousness diminished newness.

Video killed the radio star.
maybe. i have a hard time believing we're at the end of history.
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Old 03-05-2013   #115
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Is street photography dead?

Not until there aren't any more streets!
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Old 03-05-2013   #116
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So, it looks like we have 2 types of Street Photography getting intertwined....
  • Classic Street Photography: LikeHenri CartierBrenson, Robert Capa,Garry Winogrand, Bruce Gildon, Vivian Maier...
    • although these all have different styles.... are more of telling a story, invoking an emotion for the viewer...Timing/Composition/Lighting/Geometry is all a part of this type SP.
  • Documentary Street Photography: (My Def) Where there is more photographing of objects, walls, buildings, that may or may not tell a story or have an emotional appeal. The images can be more in line of graphic art of real things, or just a snap like shot of an interesting thing or building. People are not the main subject, the main subject can be anything. Composition is also important in these photos. Telling a story or invoking an emotion with the viewer is not as important. It is more Documenting what you see on the street.. and will, down the road, will serve as a historical image of that time.
I believe the Original poster meant "Classical Street Photography" Which is the hardest genres in photography to master. IMO.. It is more than a good framing skill... that works well for "Documentary Street Photography". but Classic Street Photography (my def: for my post) is also documenting.. and much much more. IMO.


Both have a place in history, with totally different impacts on the viewer...



Both are alive and well
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Old 03-05-2013   #117
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Because we all know that the average rich/middle class person can never be interesting... More close minded, stereotypical bull**** really.

Seems to me that some people think street photography always has to be witty and conform to the decisive moment. That reminds me of people who think that music is all about craming a thousand notes per second into a song for it to be good. Sometimes, playing three chords works.
I don't think it's so much close-minded or stereotypical as much as it is my first-hand experience from living in New York and opinion. NYC (Manhattan specifically) hands you street photography on a silver-platter and I found (opinion again) that you either have to work way harder to find something un-touched or you become complacent with ordinary images that really say nothing about anything and just have people in it -no emotion, no thought, nothing deeper than "just being there".

Trust me, check out my site and you'll see plenty of shots in Manhattan because I did find some things that interested me. But 99% of the people are shopping or doing touristy things, which frankly is boring to me and says very little other than the fact that people like to shop and look up at buildings. I imagine at least part of you feels the same way, judging by the locations you shoot on your flickr account.

You obviously can do street photography everywhere and find stuff to shoot everywhere (I live in a town of 1500 and I still find stuff to shoot), but New York City is so flooded with it that it's no longer really interesting. It's been done, it's been said. I believe art in street photography is about pushing the boundaries, finding new things to shoot, photographing things that reflect something spectacular about the human condition. Unfortunately, I think street photography is dying in this regard because it got just too damn easy. Where is the challenge? What are you trying to capture if not for a decisive moment? Why not witty or at least intelligent and thought-provoking? Any idiot can walk through a crowd blindly shooting everything. If conforming is the opposite of this, I'll gladly call myself a decisive-moment seeking, witty, conformist (though I don't find many of my photographs witty, really).
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Old 03-05-2013   #118
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First, I'd like to apologize for not exercising as much tact as you've extended to me. I've been trying harder not to be as rough, but at times I still get emotional over this stuff.

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I don't think it's so much close-minded or stereotypical as much as it is my first-hand experience from living in New York and opinion. NYC (Manhattan specifically) hands you street photography on a silver-platter and I found (opinion again) that you either have to work way harder to find something un-touched or you become complacent with ordinary images that really say nothing about anything and just have people in it -no emotion, no thought, nothing deeper than "just being there".
I do understand. I guess I just got a bit offended that a certain group of people cannot be interesting. I do get what you are saying though and we all struggle with it in NYC. I guess it is why 75% of my photos aren't of people these days.

Quote:
Trust me, check out my site and you'll see plenty of shots in Manhattan because I did find some things that interested me. But 99% of the people are shopping or doing touristy things, which frankly is boring to me and says very little other than the fact that people like to shop and look up at buildings. I imagine at least part of you feels the same way, judging by the locations you shoot on your flickr account.
In all fairness I do feel that way at times, but try to make do. Mostly, I have come to terms with the fact that I'm not a street photographer in the decisive moment sense of the term. I just photograph whatever I think will make an interesting photo in my opinion and don't care if it's street or not (though at times I try the decisive moment thing). I have looked at your site and really enjoyed it.

Quote:
You obviously can do street photography everywhere and find stuff to shoot everywhere (I live in a town of 1500 and I still find stuff to shoot), but New York City is so flooded with it that it's no longer really interesting. It's been done, it's been said.
But times change, things change and if you worry about what's already been done, you end up making a huge list of what not to photograph instead of just enjoying yourself. As I've gotten older, I have come to terms that I'm derivative and that what I do has been done before. I've chosen just to enjoy it. If something comes out of it eventually, then even better. The only way to find your own voice /style is to go out there and do it. The history of photography is full of great photographers copying from each other. Check out the book "the ongoing moment" by Geoff Dyer which ties together photographers and their preoccupations with certain subjects.

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I believe art in street photography is about pushing the boundaries, finding new things to shoot, photographing things that reflect something spectacular about the human condition.
Nothing wrong with that, but as you've conceded, it's not that easy. Most of us won't be that lucky to be groundbreaking. It doesn't mean you cannot make something of worth. The great thing about photography is nothing is ever the same since time changes everything. Also, time changes how we perceive photos that have been taken. Context changes our perception of how images are read.

Quote:
Unfortunately, I think street photography is dying in this regard because it got just too damn easy. Where is the challenge? What are you trying to capture if not for a decisive moment? Why not witty or at least intelligent and thought-provoking? Any idiot can walk through a crowd blindly shooting everything. If conforming is the opposite of this, I'll gladly call myself a decisive-moment seeking, witty, conformist (though I don't find many of my photographs witty, really).
Don't get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with the decisive moment at all. I enjoy looking at that type of work a lot. However, it is not the only way to photograph. That was my point. I guess I feel street still life is still street photography. Posed portraits made on the street is still street to me. Many don't share that opinion and that's ok. We can't all agree on everything.
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Old 03-05-2013   #119
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"I believe art in street photography is about pushing the boundaries, finding new things to shoot, photographing things that reflect something spectacular about the human condition."

And though I find some of this true I find finding the moment when this along when all the elements come together and having the vision to first see it and then the technical skill to capture it is the true art of it. Because without those elements the image in most cases will not have staying power. Its read immediately, one gets immediate gratification and one moves on but as we know the great images have staying power and they call you back because the more you look the more you see those elements in the image.
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Old 03-05-2013   #120
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Originally Posted by airfrogusmc View Post
And though I find some of this true I find finding the moment when this along when all the elements come together and having the vision to first see it and then the technical skill to capture it is the true art of it. Because without those elements the image in most cases will not have staying power.
In bold. The history of photography and what galleries, museums, book makers, etc deem to be the best examples doesn't support this though. There are many photos that have staying power that do not conform to those elements all coming together. I'll admit that when they do all come together, the resulting image can be magical. However, I think the images of Walker Evans are magical too.
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