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View Poll Results: Is Street Photography Dead?
Yes 82 20.55%
No 317 79.45%
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Old 03-05-2013   #121
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"I believe art in street photography is about pushing the boundaries, finding new things to shoot, photographing things that reflect something spectacular about the human condition."

And though I find some of this true I find finding the moment when this along when all the elements come together and having the vision to first see it and then the technical skill to capture it is the true art of it. Because without those elements the image in most cases will not have staying power. Its read immediately, one gets immediate gratification and one moves on but as we know the great images have staying power and they call you back because the more you look the more you see those elements in the image.
This is why I think SP is the hardest Photography to master.... to produce photographs with "Staying Power'.

Don't get me wrong, many great SP photographs are out there... and are very good indeed. But, may lack that staying power for the long haul.

Although...... if a photograph had a great impression at 1st with one person... it may continue to have a great 1st impression later on... just thinking out loud in words....
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Old 03-05-2013   #122
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This is why I think SP is the hardest Photography to master.... to produce photographs with "Staying Power'.

Don't get me wrong, many great SP photographs are out there... and are very good indeed. But, may lack that staying power for the long haul.

Although...... if a photograph had a great impression at 1st with one person... it may continue to have a great 1st impression later on... just thinking out loud in words....
I think of it like music that I first hear and like because its easy to understand but doesn't hold up on repeat listenings. Many time I have heard a piece I didn't really like thee first time I listened but the more I listened the more it unfolded and I understood and this is the one I continue to go back to. You could apply that to a lot of great creative work of any kind. A great quote by Ralph Gibson that I fully agree with. But yes it can be simple yet effective but there is usually more there than what of the surface for it to remain interesting over time.
"A good photograph, like a good painting, speaks with a loud voice and demands time and attention if it is to be fully perceived. An art lover is perfectly willing to hang a painting on a wall for years on end, but ask him to study a single photograph for ten unbroken minutes and he’ll think it’s a waste of time. Staying power is difficult to build into a photograph. Mostly, it takes content. A good photograph can penetrate the subconscious – but only if it is allowed to speak for however much time it needs to get there." - Ralph Gibson
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Old 03-05-2013   #123
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In bold. The history of photography and what galleries, museums, book makers, etc deem to be the best examples doesn't support this though. There are many photos that have staying power that do not conform to those elements all coming together. I'll admit that when they do all come together, the resulting image can be magical. However, I think the images of Walker Evans are magical too.
In most great work there are those elements if you look for them. Evans work has them. Bressons work surely has them. Langes work has it. DeCarava work has it. Gibson, Arnold Newman, Winogrand, Robert Frank work all has it. They all were/are fluent in visual language and how fluent we are determines our level of understanding.

Weston had such strong vision his peppers looked like nudes that looked like clouds that looked like shells that looked like nudes that looked like peppers.
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Old 03-06-2013   #124
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In most great work there are those elements if you look for them. Evans work has them. Bressons work surely has them. Langes work has it. DeCarava work has it. Gibson, Arnold Newman, Winogrand, Robert Frank work all has it. They all were/are fluent in visual language and how fluent we are determines our level of understanding.

Weston had such strong vision his peppers looked like nudes that looked like clouds that looked like shells that looked like nudes that looked like peppers.
I think you misunderstood what I said.
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Old 03-06-2013   #125
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I can't believe people are arguing about this. Who cares? This is one of those questions with no logical answer designed to ruffle feathers. If you like street photography, then continue to shoot it. If you don't, then shoot something else.

Street photography is no more dead than rock music. Everything is derivative, after all.

Personally, street photography isn't for me. I love it when it's well done, but to me, for every good image I see, there are 20 that look like nothing more than snapshots of random people walking down the street. But I applaud those who do it and do it well. I don't have the cojones to get close enough to strangers and snap their photograph. The only time I do this is when I travel. But here in Boston, sticking a camera in a stranger's face usually doesn't go over well!
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Old 03-06-2013   #126
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Street photography is no more dead than rock music.
There, that sums it up...
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Old 03-06-2013   #127
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Probably not (like film ) but the too many uninteresting pictures taken on a street and posted everywhere claiming to be street photography are making the genre less interesting for the viewer.
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Old 03-06-2013   #128
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maybe. i have a hard time believing we're at the end of history.
I didn't says it was entirely dead. We still have radio.

It's just not an artistic force capable of opening new worlds in the same, almost Romantic, way that the HCB/Winogrand era did.

For some it veers into cultural look-see for the travelled (Indian gurus are now a Flickr dime a dozen...nothing new to see here folks...done to death), or degenerates into a funniest home videos equivalent...a semi-staged freak show. Security cameras capture more authentic "street" scenes now.

So, when people think "street photography" and plug into the HCB/Winogrand mindset, yes, mostly dead as a nouveau art form. As a standby photographic process of capturing the nuances and oddities of the public world now ubiquitous as is the concrete we walk on, sure, it persists. But more people drive now than walk streets, so the well to draw from was never really as democratically deep. It is no wonder that the "ethnic street" is where people look to know, with all the otherness voyeurism that implies (and which National Geo did address during the golden era in any case).
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Old 03-06-2013   #129
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Very well put Aristophanes. However, is the only reason to continue to do something is to break new ground? Also, each year there are people who just discover there is something called street photography and it is all surely fresh to them. If we worry about your place in history, you may never actaully do / enjoy anything. It seems to me that the people who worry about if something is dead are the ones who are trying to "make it" instead of doing it because they can't help but do it. Doing something for notoriety seems to be a young person's concern.

This time period needs to be documented just as much as any other. That said, I guess the point comes back to the fact that people think it is overdocumented. I figure history will sort out and remember what's worth remembering.
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Old 03-06-2013   #130
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Too many cameras. Unfortunately: yes. Killed by over saturation and the growing annoyance exhibited by subjects as a result.
Annoying people while photographing is a clear sing of incompetence and lack of experience as a photographer, it has nothing to do with street photography, the camera or anything else for that matter.
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Old 03-06-2013   #131
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Just look at all the "hot" cameras in the market today, what they're all good at? Street photography... That might tell you something very dramatic that all other genres of photography are dead and only street is left.
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Old 03-06-2013   #132
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The only new ground in any visual art is making it your own somehow. In several thousand years of two dimensional art and over 185 years of photography, its really all been done.

There has been a recent new interest in street work and because we are being watched all the time and there are millions that don't have any regard for visual considerations the moment when all the visual elements come together is what will even make those that see it and can capture it that much more precious. The good work will always find a place and I would go further in saying the herd is just shooting people on the street with no rhyme or reason and that makes those that see and can put those elements into their work not the herd and thus special.
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Old 03-06-2013   #133
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Street photography is no more dead than rock music. Everything is derivative, after all.
Rock is deader than baroque at this point.
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Old 03-06-2013   #134
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I think what people forget is that even the best of the best weren't great when they first picked up the camera. It takes time and practice to be great. Sure, it'll take some less time than others. The thing now is that we see all of the practice shots all over the web. Many of us here are guilty of it too. In the past, you only got to see the great stuff unless you were in a camera club, looked at amateur photo magazines, or were in school for photography.
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Old 03-06-2013   #135
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I didn't says it was entirely dead. We still have radio.

It's just not an artistic force capable of opening new worlds in the same, almost Romantic, way that the HCB/Winogrand era did.

For some it veers into cultural look-see for the travelled (Indian gurus are now a Flickr dime a dozen...nothing new to see here folks...done to death), or degenerates into a funniest home videos equivalent...a semi-staged freak show. Security cameras capture more authentic "street" scenes now.

So, when people think "street photography" and plug into the HCB/Winogrand mindset, yes, mostly dead as a nouveau art form. As a standby photographic process of capturing the nuances and oddities of the public world now ubiquitous as is the concrete we walk on, sure, it persists. But more people drive now than walk streets, so the well to draw from was never really as democratically deep. It is no wonder that the "ethnic street" is where people look to know, with all the otherness voyeurism that implies (and which National Geo did address during the golden era in any case).
maybe the exoticism was gone from urban photography after atget, and yeah everyone's seen a camera and knows how to hold their facial muscles to look like hollywood, but humans are pretty fascinating and they leave themselves open to observation. it's not like no one's ever seen a picture, and i don't know that HCB's puddle leaper would have the effect today that it did back at the dawn of time, but visual imagery is very powerful. i don't know that photos are quite like radio, but your point is well taken. we would do well to remember that at one point, RCA and Zenith were high-tech companies and that hermes still makes buggy whips (though they likely are used primarily in non-buggy related applications ).

i'm always curious about the effect of cars. i grew up in a walking city - new york - and i live in a driving city - austin - and i'm quite conscious of the difference. public life still exists here, but it's not schoolgirls walking down narrow alleys to night markets. people have to be more intentional about how they congregate. that intentionality lends itself to observation. i'm often disappointed (from a photographic standpoint) in meandering around austin. i find i have to be a lot more intentional about my own activities. in new york, on the other hand, or in london or paris or hong kong, photographic subjects appear serendipitously (to me at least) a lot more frequently. still, i think there's a fairly deeply democratic pool of activity in my car-based environment.

otherness, voyeurism, narrative tension all exist in the city of austin, but i find that austin's public life is a lot more shopping/touristy/quotidian stuff than that of a city like new york. i have found a high level of exoticism in the otherness of india when i've been there, but it's not clear that i know what to look for or where to look for it in mumbai, even if i do know that there is a lot to look for. i have a pretty good idea about where to look in places i'm more familiar with. and for me, that helps me as a photographer. the world is indeed a smaller place and a less romantic one than it was 100 years ago, but i think there's still plenty of stuff worth shooting.
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Old 03-06-2013   #136
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I think what people forget is that even the best of the best weren't great when they first picked up the camera. It takes time and practice to be great. Sure, it'll take some less time than others. The thing now is that we see all of the practice shots all over the web. Many of us here are guilty of it too. In the past, you only got to see the great stuff unless you were in a camera club, looked at amateur photo magazines, or were in school for photography.
Absolutely..

Editing is SO important. What you don't show is as important, maybe more, than what you do show.
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Old 03-06-2013   #137
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Editing is SO important. What you don't show is as important, maybe more, than what you do show.
It's also the hardest part of photography IMO.
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Old 03-06-2013   #138
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maybe the exoticism was gone from urban photography after atget, and yeah everyone's seen a camera and knows how to hold their facial muscles to look like hollywood, but humans are pretty fascinating and they leave themselves open to observation. it's not like no one's ever seen a picture, and i don't know that HCB's puddle leaper would have the effect today that it did back at the dawn of time, but visual imagery is very powerful. i don't know that photos are quite like radio, but your point is well taken. we would do well to remember that at one point, RCA and Zenith were high-tech companies and that hermes still makes buggy whips (though they likely are used primarily in non-buggy related applications ).

i'm always curious about the effect of cars. i grew up in a walking city - new york - and i live in a driving city - austin - and i'm quite conscious of the difference. public life still exists here, but it's not schoolgirls walking down narrow alleys to night markets. people have to be more intentional about how they congregate. that intentionality lends itself to observation. i'm often disappointed (from a photographic standpoint) in meandering around austin. i find i have to be a lot more intentional about my own activities. in new york, on the other hand, or in london or paris or hong kong, photographic subjects appear serendipitously (to me at least) a lot more frequently. still, i think there's a fairly deeply democratic pool of activity in my car-based environment.

otherness, voyeurism, narrative tension all exist in the city of austin, but i find that austin's public life is a lot more shopping/touristy/quotidian stuff than that of a city like new york. i have found a high level of exoticism in the otherness of india when i've been there, but it's not clear that i know what to look for or where to look for it in mumbai, even if i do know that there is a lot to look for. i have a pretty good idea about where to look in places i'm more familiar with. and for me, that helps me as a photographer. the world is indeed a smaller place and a less romantic one than it was 100 years ago, but i think there's still plenty of stuff worth shooting.
One thing that is very new in the past decade and is hard to avoid (if one would indeed want to) is the cell phones and texting.

The reason I think HCBs jumper would still be just as strong today is the use of visual language. I have been to a lot of his exhibits over the years and have seen this image time and time again and it seem to always surprise me. All the repeating shapes in it. The poster in the background and the mirror image in the water and the shape that the jumpers legs make and the image in the water form an arrow head with the shaft being the board. And the fact if you look in most of his work you see repeating shapes or leading lines triangular compositions and many other visual elements that make his work so strong. Some of those elements are in most of his work and in some cases all of those elements are in the image.

The work of Robert Frank is much different from HCBs but his better work still has those visual elements and is also a mirror to our society as it was in the mid to late 1950s.

Now in this new age there are many issues a good street photographer can address but what will remain in all the better work is the strong use of the language we all try and use to communicate ideas. How fluent we are will show in how complex those elements are in our work. We are all a product of everything we have lived and learned. Those lessons will be in our work no matter how deep or shallow that may be. Minor White said that"all photographs are self portraits" and DeCarava said that 'when you see my work you see me and when you see me you see my work".
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Old 03-06-2013   #139
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It's also the hardest part of photography IMO.
Yes and with the new age and I'm as guilty as the next, I sometimes show things on the web that I would have never shown a print of.
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Old 03-06-2013   #140
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also, aristophanes, it's noteworthy to me that you've used the words "freak show". this is often how i shorthand the things i like to go and shoot here in austin (even my kids know this about me). i think a lot of things that persist as valuable subjects were at the time of origin freak shows, even intentionally constructed ones. gypsies, surf culture, teenage toughs in brooklyn, just to name three groups that are treated topically on my bookshelves.

the editorial board does note that any conclusion that therefore all freak shows are shootworthy fails.
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Old 03-06-2013   #141
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I would say that Arbus was more in line with finding those subjects and not so much Winogrand and HCB.
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Old 03-06-2013   #142
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or the great bruce davidson

http://www.gregkucera.com/_images/da...avid_dwarf.jpg

i wonder if this image wouldn't be as great if it never had the whole book to appear in and all the other images around it to provide context. perhaps a big issue about street has to with the (perceived) decline of glossy-book publishing. images, as i read just the other day, work best in groups where they can support each other.
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Old 03-06-2013   #143
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A lot freaks in BDs Subway to.

I think all the greats work in terms of bodies of work which many today miss. One great at bat no more makes an MVP than one good photo makes a great photographer.

Works like Robert Franks The Americans is about the larger whole and each individual piece might be great on its on but its more important how it fits into the great whole. And thne how one image leads into the next and how it works laying in say a book next to the other image (transitions) I read a piece years ago where Ralph Gibson talked about an image that he made that was very strong but didn't include it the current body of work he was working one because it didn't fit but that image was the start of a new direction for his next project. He called it a point of departure IIRC.

Heres a good piece on The Americans BW. Sorry if you've already seen it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHtRZBDOgag

It really is so much more difficult to put 40 images that are all strong and all work well together and all have a common goal than it is to make one good photograph. And the editing is SO hard. Leaving out a strong image that doesn't really fit can be so tough because you as the photographer can be so close to it..
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Old 03-06-2013   #144
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Speaking of Robert Frank an interesting piece by Meyerowitz

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=jvRyXju8Fmo
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Old 03-06-2013   #145
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Speaking of Robert Frank an interesting piece by Meyerowitz

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&fe...&v=jvRyXju8Fmo
He mentions Robert Frank working with and photographing 11 year old girls. And that, my friends, is the difference between street photography in the 50's (and photography in general) and street nowadays. You are no longer regarded as an artist, more an anti-social predator.
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Old 03-06-2013   #146
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He mentions Robert Frank working with and photographing 11 year old girls. And that, my friends, is the difference between street photography in the 50's (and photography in general) and street nowadays. You are no longer regarded as an artist, more an anti-social predator.
Thats not all Frank photographed. In fact probably not one of his more memorable images. And a bright photographer could somehow show that new reality. Hey a new street project....
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Old 03-06-2013   #147
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our public dialogue presumes less innocence than it did 50 years ago
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Old 03-06-2013   #148
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Very well put Aristophanes. However, is the only reason to continue to do something is to break new ground? Also, each year there are people who just discover there is something called street photography and it is all surely fresh to them. If we worry about your place in history, you may never actaully do / enjoy anything. It seems to me that the people who worry about if something is dead are the ones who are trying to "make it" instead of doing it because they can't help but do it. Doing something for notoriety seems to be a young person's concern.

This time period needs to be documented just as much as any other. That said, I guess the point comes back to the fact that people think it is overdocumented. I figure history will sort out and remember what's worth remembering.
Boils down to one's definition of "street". As a slice of life pictorial, go for it. Fun. Might see some new things. Stopping our world's spin with a snap is still an insight into itself.

As a groundbreaking news or art form, "street" is dead. What is the message it is trying to impart? The "moment"? Taken over by sport photography

Untold stories of urban culture? Urban decay? Street violence (the tension inherent in the Rodney King LA riot videos did that in compared to the Watts photos of an earlier era)? Fashion? Drug abuse? Sure, still relevant in essay and documentary form edging towards photojournalism. All still valid forms of information, but not going to turn heads as an expressive art in itself the way HCB/Winogrand envisioned the movement. For most of the 1980's the "street" was literally replaced by the mall, yet street photography never quite kept up with the times. "Street photography" in the classic sense depended on a public life that does not exist so much now in the West, so unless one goes down the supposed newfound authenticity of the ethnic street, any sense of tension or discovery is not so much in the medium as in the content. Oh, those weird Asian streetscapes and people! Such odd food hanging in the windows. Look at that guy's beard! Those poor, poor urchins selling sodas in traffic. Etc.

I used to watch Jeff Wall stage some outdoor shots in Vancouver; the complete opposite of classic "street" photography. Yet, upon viewing the finished product, in some ways far more interesting outcome than happenstance street photography in the same locale. For some reason his work touches a nerve of familiarity with the location and the people despite being elaborately staged, more than any "street" photo I saw of my home town.

I am one of those people just a little bit scared of clowns
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Old 03-06-2013   #149
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Boils down to one's definition of "street". As a slice of life pictorial, go for it. Fun. Might see some new things. Stopping our world's spin with a snap is still an insight into itself.

As a groundbreaking news or art form, "street" is dead. What is the message it is trying to impart? The "moment"? Taken over by sport photography

Untold stories of urban culture? Urban decay? Street violence (the tension inherent in the Rodney King LA riot videos did that in compared to the Watts photos of an earlier era)? Fashion? Drug abuse? Sure, still relevant in essay and documentary form edging towards photojournalism. All still valid forms of information, but not going to turn heads as an expressive art in itself the way HCB/Winogrand envisioned the movement. For most of the 1980's the "street" was literally replaced by the mall, yet street photography never quite kept up with the times. "Street photography" in the classic sense depended on a public life that does not exist so much now in the West, so unless one goes down the supposed newfound authenticity of the ethnic street, any sense of tension or discovery is not so much in the medium as in the content. Oh, those weird Asian streetscapes and people! Such odd food hanging in the windows. Look at that guy's beard! Those poor, poor urchins selling sodas in traffic. Etc.

I used to watch Jeff Wall stage some outdoor shots in Vancouver; the complete opposite of classic "street" photography. Yet, upon viewing the finished product, in some ways far more interesting outcome than happenstance street photography in the same locale. For some reason his work touches a nerve of familiarity with the location and the people despite being elaborately staged, more than any "street" photo I saw of my home town.

I am one of those people just a little bit scared of clowns
I know here in Chicago there has been a new interest everywhere in street photography as an art form. So its clearly not dead. Most sports photography is moving to remote muti-camera set ups which is slowly moving to video with someone a half world away in a both finding the moment from a video stream and most sports photography is done in a commercial type situation. I say commercial in reference to anything being shot with money being the main reason. Fashion would also fall under that definition for my comments here. Rarely is anything created commercially art. What photographers that work and do it a living (myself included) usually separate their personal work which is all theirs from what they create commercially which is for a client and money. There is nothing wrong with that at all its just rarely a photographers vision that is the main creative driver but more the art director and the client.
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Old 03-06-2013   #150
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The "level of death" varies from country to country. It may be a high level in the USA.
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Old 03-06-2013   #151
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The "level of death" varies from country to country. It may be a high level in the USA.
I think bad street work has never lived other than on the world wide web. I think good work in any area is alive and well.
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Old 03-06-2013   #152
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I was thinking of the barriers raised by security people not allowing such work in many places.
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Old 03-06-2013   #153
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I was thinking of the barriers raised by security people not allowing such work in many places.
DOH yes in some of those places maybe documenting the human condition is the most difficult and dangerous but sadly, probably the most important.
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Old 03-06-2013   #154
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No. This argument should be laid to rest once and for all.


Know your rights. Courtesy "Peta Pixel".

1. You can make a photograph of anything and anyone on any public property, except where a specific law prohibits it.

i.e. streets, sidewalks, town squares, parks, government buildings open to the public, and public libraries.

2. You may shoot on private property if it is open to the public, but you are obligated to stop if the owner requests it.

i.e. malls, retail stores, restaurants, banks, and office building lobbies.

3. Private property owners can prevent photography ON their property, but not photography OF their property from a public location.

4. Anyone can be photographed without consent when they are in a public place unless there is a reasonable expectation of privacy.

i.e. private homes, restrooms, dressing rooms, medical facilities, and phone booths.

5. Despite common misconceptions, the following subjects are almost always permissible:

* accidents, fire scenes, criminal activities
* children, celebrities, law enforcement officers
* bridges, infrastructure, transportation facilities
* residential, commercial, and industrial buildings

6. Security is rarely an acceptable reason for restricting photography. Photographing from a public place cannot infringe on trade secrets, nor is it terrorist activity.

7. Private parties cannot detain you against your will unless a serious crime was committed in their presence. Those that do so may be subject to criminal and civil charges.

8. It is a crime for someone to threaten injury, detention, confiscation, or arrest because you are making photographs.

9. You are not obligated to provide your identity or reason for photographing unless questioned by a law enforcement officer and state law requires it.

10. Private parties have no right to confiscate your equipment without a court order. Even law enforcement officers must obtain one unless making an arrest. No one can force you to delete photos you have made.

These are general guidelines regarding the right to make photos and should not be in
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Old 03-07-2013   #155
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Originally Posted by kbg32 View Post
No. This argument should be laid to rest once and for all.


Know your rights. Courtesy "Peta Pixel".

1. You can make a photograph of anything and anyone on any public property, except where a specific law prohibits it.

i.e. streets, sidewalks, town squares, parks, government buildings open to the public, and public libraries.

2. You may shoot on private property if it is open to the public, but you are obligated to stop if the owner requests it.

i.e. malls, retail stores, restaurants, banks, and office building lobbies.

3. Private property owners can prevent photography ON their property, but not photography OF their property from a public location.

4. Anyone can be photographed without consent when they are in a public place unless there is a reasonable expectation of privacy.

i.e. private homes, restrooms, dressing rooms, medical facilities, and phone booths.

5. Despite common misconceptions, the following subjects are almost always permissible:

* accidents, fire scenes, criminal activities
* children, celebrities, law enforcement officers
* bridges, infrastructure, transportation facilities
* residential, commercial, and industrial buildings

6. Security is rarely an acceptable reason for restricting photography. Photographing from a public place cannot infringe on trade secrets, nor is it terrorist activity.

7. Private parties cannot detain you against your will unless a serious crime was committed in their presence. Those that do so may be subject to criminal and civil charges.

8. It is a crime for someone to threaten injury, detention, confiscation, or arrest because you are making photographs.

9. You are not obligated to provide your identity or reason for photographing unless questioned by a law enforcement officer and state law requires it.

10. Private parties have no right to confiscate your equipment without a court order. Even law enforcement officers must obtain one unless making an arrest. No one can force you to delete photos you have made.

These are general guidelines regarding the right to make photos and should not be in
Keith, excellent post. I'm glad to see your in NY, because I do all my shooting in the NYC are. I always wondered about a few of these scenarios.
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Old 03-07-2013   #156
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Boils down to one's definition of "street". As a slice of life pictorial, go for it. Fun. Might see some new things. Stopping our world's spin with a snap is still an insight into itself.
True, I choose to have a wide open definition of what street photography can be. If one is out on the streets photographing found subject matter, it is street to me... still life, portraits, decisive moment, etc. Of course, commercial stuff like fashion is done on the streets too, but then i wouldn't consider it street.

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As a groundbreaking news or art form, "street" is dead. What is the message it is trying to impart?
Every time something is proclaimed to be dead in the arts, someone comes along and breathes new life into it. I just think it moves further and further away from the mainstream with each decade. I mean even Winogrand and Cartier Bresson are not known by the average joe.

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Oh, those weird Asian streetscapes and people! Such odd food hanging in the windows. Look at that guy's beard! Those poor, poor urchins selling sodas in traffic. Etc.
Well, that the jaded attitude towards photography these days. I choose to photograph what I want to photograph. If someone else wants to look at my photos, even better. Yes, a lot of it is derivative and I'm not immune to the cliche. I cannot concern myself with worrying about what's been done already. If we all did, there would be no photos made. I choose to be a fan of photography and to not be bothered by its supposed death. Perhaps it is a selfish, self-indulgent act, but I enjoy it. I'm not concerned with only street photography though... I like many of photography's dead genres.

Quote:
I used to watch Jeff Wall stage some outdoor shots in Vancouver; the complete opposite of classic "street" photography. Yet, upon viewing the finished product, in some ways far more interesting outcome than happenstance street photography in the same locale. For some reason his work touches a nerve of familiarity with the location and the people despite being elaborately staged, more than any "street" photo I saw of my home town.
He makes interesting work at times and I can agree with what you say. But I'm a fan of conceptual art as well and its use of photography. Good work is good work.
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Old 03-07-2013   #157
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Good work is good work.
Absolutely!!!!
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Old 03-08-2013   #158
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Originally Posted by Carterofmars View Post
Is Street Photography Dead?
Yes, street photography is dead.

Just like film photography was declared dead by the experts ten years ago.
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Old 03-08-2013   #159
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No, because Simon saw sunlight.
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Old 03-09-2013   #160
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Originally Posted by kbg32 View Post
No. This argument should be laid to rest once and for all.


Know your rights. Courtesy "Peta Pixel".

1. You can make a photograph of anything and anyone on any public property, except where a specific law prohibits it.

i.e. streets, sidewalks, town squares, parks, government buildings open to the public, and public libraries.

2. You may shoot on private property if it is open to the public, but you are obligated to stop if the owner requests it.

i.e. malls, retail stores, restaurants, banks, and office building lobbies.

3. Private property owners can prevent photography ON their property, but not photography OF their property from a public location.

4. Anyone can be photographed without consent when they are in a public place unless there is a reasonable expectation of privacy.

i.e. private homes, restrooms, dressing rooms, medical facilities, and phone booths.

5. Despite common misconceptions, the following subjects are almost always permissible:

* accidents, fire scenes, criminal activities
* children, celebrities, law enforcement officers
* bridges, infrastructure, transportation facilities
* residential, commercial, and industrial buildings

6. Security is rarely an acceptable reason for restricting photography. Photographing from a public place cannot infringe on trade secrets, nor is it terrorist activity.

7. Private parties cannot detain you against your will unless a serious crime was committed in their presence. Those that do so may be subject to criminal and civil charges.

8. It is a crime for someone to threaten injury, detention, confiscation, or arrest because you are making photographs.

9. You are not obligated to provide your identity or reason for photographing unless questioned by a law enforcement officer and state law requires it.

10. Private parties have no right to confiscate your equipment without a court order. Even law enforcement officers must obtain one unless making an arrest. No one can force you to delete photos you have made.

These are general guidelines regarding the right to make photos and should not be in
So true..... For the US, try this in, say, North Korea and you will never ever return. Don't state legal information as being universally true if it is US specific!
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