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Old 11-08-2015   #281
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Srono View Post
Hei Benj,

Have you visited the local stores ([email protected] Basah, or Aesthetic Bay)? Try the all these pens to see if like the handling. They have all Nakaya, Pelikan, etc. on display.

Yes, M200 cafe creme is delicious when you pair with cafe color ink!
Nope I dont want to fall into the trap of testing them just yet....the moment you test them...your hands get much more itchy and out comes your wallet.

Cafe Creme really reminds me of the coffee in Vietnam....

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I've had my flock for a number of years without seeing this happen. Assuming you start out with a properly set-up sample, if you treat them reasonably, keep them reasonably clean (by which I mean-- don't baby or overclean them) they will last for years without having to send it to anybody. Sounds sort of like treating a Leica camera, doesn't it?
Thank you, this is nice to know....
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Old 11-08-2015   #282
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My Nakaya. Ao-Tamenuri Piccolo Cigar.
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Old 11-10-2015   #283
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Hi,

So have you seen the pens etc in Leica's 0.95 Collection?

http://uk.leica-camera.com/World-of-....95-Collection

Regards, David
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Old 11-11-2015   #284
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Hi,

So have you seen the pens etc in Leica's 0.95 Collection?

http://uk.leica-camera.com/World-of-....95-Collection

Regards, David
I don't mind the styling but this, er, I don't know. A fountain pen to use along with your new Nocti? How very chi-chi. Better use the pen in near darkness too, otherwise why get the 0.95 version? The 2.8 would be good enough.

And no pricing, of course. If you have to ask etc.etc.

I'll buy two.


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Old 11-11-2015   #285
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I seem to prefer a slender pen. I usually write with a Cross ball point or a Montblanc rollerball. I'd like to see some comments about the Cross fountain pen. Also, what other slender fountain pens can be recommended?
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Old 11-11-2015   #286
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Originally Posted by telenous View Post
I don't mind the styling but this, er, I don't know. A fountain pen to use along with your new Nocti? How very chi-chi. Better use the pen in near darkness too, otherwise why get the 0.95 version? The 2.8 would be good enough.

And no pricing, of course. If you have to ask etc.etc.

I'll buy two.


.
$840 at Leica Store Miami. Boom.
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Old 11-11-2015   #287
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Originally Posted by coelacanth View Post
$840 at Leica Store Miami. Boom.
Hi,

I'd say "boo hoo" not "Boom" but it's what you expect these days...

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Old 11-15-2015   #288
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
I seem to prefer a slender pen. I usually write with a Cross ball point or a Montblanc rollerball. I'd like to see some comments about the Cross fountain pen. Also, what other slender fountain pens can be recommended?
I have 2 Cross fountain pens. They are very comfortable to hold and use. Their tips are very rigid (yet smooth to write).
I stopped using them once I discovered the more flexible tips I bought with my two Pelikans.
I even had one tip made extra flexible, and found this opened a whole new feeling about handwriting.
.
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Old 11-19-2015   #289
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob-F View Post
I seem to prefer a slender pen. I usually write with a Cross ball point or a Montblanc rollerball. I'd like to see some comments about the Cross fountain pen. Also, what other slender fountain pens can be recommended?
My most slender pen is a Pilot Elite, a pocket sized pen:

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MB 146 and Parker 51
Old 12-05-2015   #290
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MB 146 and Parker 51




Very different pens, both enjoyable to write with.
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Old 12-06-2015   #291
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My most slender pen is a Pilot Elite, a pocket sized pen:
The Pilots also have very nice fine and x-fine tips as well.
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Old 12-18-2015   #292
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A row of Esterbrook J fountain pens.
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Old 12-21-2015   #293
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Le Man 100 Opera, which was the top-of-the-line Waterman when I bought it in the late '80s. Fine nib and piston cartridge is installed.



Am eying a Pelikan.
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Old 12-23-2015   #294
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Lost my favourite pen a couple of months ago ( hole in pocket) -Parker 61 capillary fill. Not sure what will be my main pen now. Might fill up the Parker 51!
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Old 12-23-2015   #295
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Quote:
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Lost my favourite pen a couple of months ago ( hole in pocket) -Parker 61 capillary fill. Not sure what will be my main pen now. Might fill up the Parker 51!
About a year and a half ago I lost two fountain pens, an English Parker 61 (aerometric fill) with which I had written a PhD dissertation 30 years ago, and an inexpensive Reform 1745 (?) school pen. I looked everywhere for the Parker, in particular, because of its sentimental value, but to no avail. About a month ago I watched a Parker 21 that had belonged to my grandfather disappear into the innards of my favorite reading chair and I staged a major search of the chair. I had almost given up on that pen when a flashlight revealed the glint of a chrome cap in a very difficult to access pocket in the bottom of the chair. After much fishing about with a magnet, I I pulled the 21, the 61, the Reform, and two non-descript ballpoints out of that odd little structural cul de sac in the chair's base.

I think the cause of these losses were khaki shorts with shallow pockets that I wear in the summer. I'll never carry any but disposable pens that way in the future. I hope your Parker 61 reappears, you never know.
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Old 03-20-2016   #296
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Any one going to a local pen show?

I am seriously considering the Atlanta Pen Show next month!!!

https://www.google.com/search?q=atla...+pen+show+2016
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Old 03-20-2016   #297
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Fountain pens can be addictive, and good writing pens share a quality with good shooting cameras: you don't have to spend a fortune to get good ones that produce nice results.

But like cameras and lenses, there are some that do cost a small fortune. For example, there are Montblanc limited edition writer's series pens ("Hemingway, "Twain", "Shaw", Dumas, Poe.....the list goes on and on) that average $1000, and the more expensive versions that go from $4000 to $10,000. Montblanc will custom design diamond and gold containing pens that run over $100,000 each. But unlike expensive lenses and cameras, its all on the outside, the luxury platings and gems that are added. Function does not improve!
And most collectors never ink them! A Leica Noctilux may be expensive, but it's fast and delivers a special OOF look that is desirable for many users.

I foolishly bought a "Tolstoy" pen from Montblanc and I'm having a hard time selling it because most of world knows that its not worth the high expense for an instrument that writes no better than most reasonably priced fountain pens. Sure, some have better nibs and are smoother writers, but they don't cost thousands. To make matters worse, I used (inked) it! Tsk, Tsk, Tsk...that dramatically lowers the price on the used market. So, luxury pens are more for fondling at and collecting.

Anyway, FWIW, be careful at the pen shows and don't be seduced!
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Old 03-26-2016   #298
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Originally Posted by dave lackey View Post
Any one going to a local pen show?

I am seriously considering the Atlanta Pen Show next month!!!

https://www.google.com/search?q=atla...+pen+show+2016
You should go, Dave.
It's an eye-opener. You'll see way more people than you'd expect who has interest in fountain pens. And it's the best way to get yourself a vintage pens or two, because you can touch and in a lot of cases write with it before you buy it.
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Old 03-26-2016   #299
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You should go, Dave.
It's an eye-opener. You'll see way more people than you'd expect who has interest in fountain pens. And it's the best way to get yourself a vintage pens or two, because you can touch and in a lot of cases write with it before you buy it.
You are so right... Sounds amazing!

It is a good thing they don't have Leica shows here!
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Old 04-17-2016   #300
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Well, the pen show came and went. I was unable to go as usual.

I wonder what I missed!

I was hoping to see a Nakaya pen and actually try it! So for now I will continue with matching my cameras with fountain pens in my mind. So far, I have the black and chrome M205 pen with the chrome M6, but that is the only fountain pen I have at the moment.

Black and red for my Nikons but no funding available anytime soon.
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Old 04-17-2016   #301
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I think my favourite classic pen is this one - the Schaeffer "snorkel" (named for obvious reasons if you look at the picture). It writes very smmothly and I love the quirky snorkel that protrudes for filling and then retracts.

http://www.peytonstreetpens.com/shea...sheaffers.html

I have a similar (cheaper) one but without the snorkel

But my favourite pen of all time was a simple and relatively cheap (by classic pen standards) which wrote like a "the best dream pen ever" because it had a soft flexible solid 14 ct gold nib. I loved it till some sh*t stole it at work. The one pictured below is green. Mine was a pinkish red tortoise shell colour. The pens is made with celluloid I believe and it has a specific smell that reminds em of my childhood - early film or old ping pong balls of all things. (Both originally celluloid).

http://www.peytonstreetpens.com/conw...-restored.html

I have a Mont Blanc Meisterstuck that I bought perhaps 30 years ago but because of tis size its not my favourite. And its a bit showing. I was going thru my "yuppy" phase.

BTW I have found that Peyton Street Pens http://www.peytonstreetpens.com/ are pretty good. They sell on ebay or from their own site.
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Old 04-18-2016   #302
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Peter

Wow - reference to the snorkel takes me back! My Dad had one and although I'm not a pen guy I would love to have one again. Thanks for the memories!
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Old 04-18-2016   #303
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I went on a trip that fit this thread perfectly! Traveled around Japan the last two weeks with a TWSBI vac700 and a rangefinder.

I've always been very hesitant about taking filled fountain pens on trips, but the vac700 really didn't bleed at all while I was flying here and there, so I was very pleased.

Plus, at Itoya I grabbed three bottles of pilot iroshizuku and a bottle of sailor for 55 USD (even including currency conversion fees) total! I had no idea how affordable those inks were when sourced locally. Later I realized I shoul have just bought one of every color, but the moment had passed and I'll have to wait for next time I'm there.
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Old 04-18-2016   #304
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art supplies by Berang Berang, on Flickr

No fountains, but their cousins, dip pens.
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Old 04-18-2016   #305
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Dip pens !!! Take me back, do they !

We used those in my very early school years. Long long ago
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Old 04-28-2016   #306
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Heads up!!!

From one of the excellent pen forums, I picked up on the recommendation for the coolest leather notebook with parchment paper and it is fantastic with pen-friendly paper and that wonderful leather smell!!

Name? Bombay Journal
Where? Believe it or not, Barnes and Noble
How much? $18.95 and a smaller size $4.00 cheaper

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/mobile...clickid=3x1022

With 256 pages, this is going to last awhile!! You will not be disappointed using this journal without lines. Kinda makes you feel medieval whilst writing.

It fits nicely in my Billingham bags and what better thing to do when not shooting?
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Old 04-30-2016   #307
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Schimke View Post
I went on a trip that fit this thread perfectly! Traveled around Japan the last two weeks with a TWSBI vac700 and a rangefinder.

I've always been very hesitant about taking filled fountain pens on trips, but the vac700 really didn't bleed at all while I was flying here and there, so I was very pleased.

Plus, at Itoya I grabbed three bottles of pilot iroshizuku and a bottle of sailor for 55 USD (even including currency conversion fees) total! I had no idea how affordable those inks were when sourced locally. Later I realized I shoul have just bought one of every color, but the moment had passed and I'll have to wait for next time I'm there.
Sounds like a fun trip! If you want more Japanese inks at good prices, you can try sites like Engeika, Rakuten and J-subculture. I have ordered through Engeika before with good results, and the prices are much better than in North America...
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Old 04-30-2016   #308
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Sounds like a fun trip! If you want more Japanese inks at good prices, you can try sites like Engeika, Rakuten and J-subculture. I have ordered through Engeika before with good results, and the prices are much better than in North America...
Interesting, thanks for the tip! I had been ordering all mine from Goulet Pens, which ends up being a bit expensive.

Noodlers, however, they're great for!
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Old 04-30-2016   #309
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No fountains, but their cousins, dip pens.
I wouldn't say cousins; they more like mum and dad, while the quill being the grandfather or grandmother.

The dip pens are exasperating, quirky and just ... wonderful!

I am using Esterbrook Falcon 048 nibs for writing and inking.
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Old 05-11-2016   #310
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Not photo of pen but related....
Yoshida-san from Nakaya is setting up nib
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Old 06-13-2016   #311
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What about Ink?
I bought a Visconti Rembrandt recently. Just a steel nib but lovely to write with. Unfortunately it skips a bit. I ditched the Quink I was using and have just got a lovely bottle of the new Pelikan Edelstein series in TANZANITE. Great ink. A very dark blue black with no violet as one might have expected. Dense. Shades. I like it. I even put it in my M800, one of them. Still getting used to that.
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Old 06-14-2016   #312
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Some pens perform their best with specific inks. That's my excuse for having multiples of certain colours , chiefly black and blue-black among them. Edelstein Tanzanite is great for a black-blue kind of blue-black, if that makes sense. I also like, for sentimental reasons, Parker Quink or Waterman blue-black, arguably the same ink under different labels. My favourite among blue-blacks is Registrar's Ink. Wonderful properties, quite dry though and [caution] it does contain iron gall of course.

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Old 06-14-2016   #313
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Some pens perform their best with specific inks. That's my excuse for having multiples of certain colours , chiefly black and blue-black among them. Edelstein Tanzanite is great for a black-blue kind of blue-black, if that makes sense. I also like, for sentimental reasons, Parker Quink or Waterman blue-black, arguably the same ink under different labels. My favourite among blue-blacks is Registrar's Ink. Wonderful properties, quite dry though and [caution] it does contain iron gall of course.

.
Thanks Telenous. I did like Quink but it seems a bit too thin for me just now and soaks through the paper they have at work here. Tanzanite much less so.
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Old 06-14-2016   #314
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Some pens perform their best with specific inks. That's my excuse for having multiples of certain colours , chiefly black and blue-black among them. Edelstein Tanzanite is great for a black-blue kind of blue-black, if that makes sense. I also like, for sentimental reasons, Parker Quink or Waterman blue-black, arguably the same ink under different labels. My favourite among blue-blacks is Registrar's Ink. Wonderful properties, quite dry though and [caution] it does contain iron gall of course.

.

I have definitely found this too. Some inks are more "scratchy" than others while some seem to be sort of more lubricated and write better.

Also I can strongly recommend that anyone into fountain pens Google how to maintain and tune them. For example it is sometimes necessary to smooth the nib using very fine emery paper or an ultra fine arkansas stone or something of this sort. A pen that is not delivering ink properly can have the tynes of the nib opened slightly too, using something like a razor blade slid into the slot (with great care). I found it necessary to do this with my Mont Blanc MeisterStuck of all things. It fixed the poor ink flow and the pen now writes much better. And a further simple fix is to take out the nib and move the ink feed (the little black plastic thing below the nib) down (to increase flow) or up (to restrict it).

Full instructions are available on some discoverable web pages. e.g. the following. Its not hard for anyone who does not have ten thumbs, it just takes care.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RRvKrrZdXLs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_bNRrPk5MY

http://kcavers.blogspot.com.au/2012/...tment-101.html

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Old 06-29-2016   #315
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From one of my latest vintage pen restoration adventures:

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Old 08-11-2016   #316
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^That's a lovely Vacumatic, Shadowfox. Really beautiful in Azure. Very nice fine line too.

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An attempt at building a better pen
Old 08-21-2016   #317
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An attempt at building a better pen

I'm a fan of cheap and cheerful fountain pens

A few things bother me a little about those pens. Small reservoirs, tiny converters. Barrels not quite long enough, often top heavy with the cap posted. Or a cap that dances on the back
When young, I was taught to write with a fude brush : vertical position, fingers high on the barrel. I like to play with the position of my grip, and on most pens, the thread for the cap is in the way.
So I designed a pen that would solve all those problems. Tried to make it as simple as I could : a controlled leak, a reservoir, a simple way of filling said reservoir, in a shape that is a pleasure to write and draw with.
And the cap should make a water-tight seal around the nib.

Bought a mini-lathe, some perspex rod, and started building.



First, I tried my hand at triple entry thread. I wanted a cap that would close in two thirds of a turn. One turn in 3 mm, thread profile is 1mm wide, nearly half a mm deep, and for the cap, I cut 2 mm of thread.
I'm lazy, didn't want to change the thread gearing, so I used the same pitch for the piston and the back cap.



Here is the piston fitted to the section-body. The body and piston together can contain about 4 ml of ink. Not bad. The piston alone fills with more ink than a standard cartridge.



Drilling operations were a real pain in the derrière. Drill bits heat up very fast, and then the plastic melts. I ended up drilling 3 mm at a time, starting with a 4 mm drill, and then stepped up half a mm at a time, up to size.
Some of these cavities took a whole day to bore. Talk about boring.



All the roughed out pieces: at the back, from left to right: the piston plunger with its o-ring, the cap, the body or section. In front: the ring that keeps the plunger in the body, and the back cap.



Setting up for cutting the tapers: 1 over 19 mm. About 2 degrees per side.

And here it is, my first flawed, but working pen:



A bit longer than a MontBlanc 149, especially uncapped. Thread is at the end of the section, which tapers up from 11 mm to 16mm, but the fat part is rather far back: it is comfortable in the hand, and I can put my fingers anywhere I want.
The back cap has the same taper, so the cap fits perfectly when posted. The barrel extends about 2 cm below the cap, so it is easy to not unscrew the back cap, and if you do, there is more than enough grip to unscrew the cap itself. It has a hole in the feed, that retains a 1,5 mm tube, mounting up into the piston. As in the converter in Nooders' Ahab fountain pen, this ensures that the reservoir is filled in two or three pulls. As the pen is very light, filling it makes a significant change in its balance. I think the ink may weigh as much as the pen. One advantage of having the thread for the cap at the end of the section, is that it is (relatively) easy to build an ink-bottle cap in which you can screw in the pen, turn everything bottoms up, and fill like a syringe. An o-ring at the end of the thread should keep everything waterproof.
It is generous with ink. I fitted it with a nr.6 flex nib and matching ebonite feed, and it writes really wet. I like that. No railroading. Don't mind inky fingers.

Lots of mistakes and Bozo moments. After drilling most of the holes, I found out that when the headstock is misaligned, you get helicoidal holes. I discovered too late that my drills cut a hair undersize, so all my inside threads are too small. Had to shave a smidgen off the outside threads. When mounting the back cap in the four-jaw, for cutting the taper, I was too careful about not compressing the thin, threaded part (only 10 mm of straight, before the taper begins), and the part broke loose, made four cracks. I was only cutting a 10th of a mm.

I learnt a lot of lessons. The next one will be a lot better. The biggest lesson I learnt is that turning a pen, from scratch, is a hard, patient slog, and an expensive endeavour. If I were up to production speed I could, maybe, turn a pen in 40 or so hours. If I wanted to live off making pens, I'd have to go hungry to make them way over-priced. I have a few ideas to make the production less onerous. I could mould resin over the inside shapes, and then turn off the outsides. Happily, the inside and outside thread at the back of the body have the same pitch, so it should be possible to make moulds that allow the cured parts to unscrew easily. But pouring resins can be a stinky business, and I would need something to get rid of air bubbles. Who wants holes in their threads?

I'm going to call it 'Le Piston'.

Thank you for enduring this whale of a post. I hope the pictures will make you forgive me

Cheers

Lukas
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Old 08-21-2016   #318
daveleo
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Lukitas, that is a great story !
I envy your skills and patience.
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Old 08-21-2016   #319
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Thank you Dave!

I have to admit, this was more of a learning curve than a demonstration of skills.
The threads for the caps are miscut, they work only partly. Most of the cavities have helicoidal deformities. But the piston works well.
Kind of surprising to see how fast it sucks ink from the bottle. After the first pull, most of the body is filled. When you push down again, the air from the piston flows out first, through the little tube, and on the second pull, there is only a little air bubble left.
This may sound like boasting, but it writes exactly how I wanted it to write : richly, freely, generously. The nib floats on a layer of ink. No leaks, as of yet. And the long taper from the top of the section to the end of the body is very comfortable in the fingers; I get a lot of control by moving my fingers up and down the section.
Still, I'll be making a few changes. Mostly in machining procedure. Next one is going to be better.
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Old 08-21-2016   #320
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This is AMAZING work, Lukas!! The pen is beautiful. I'm envious of your machining abilities! Thanks a lot for posting all of this!!
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