Nikon Scanner in 2020?
Old 02-21-2020   #1
pushto1600
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Question Nikon Scanner in 2020?

Hey guys. New member here so sorry if these topic has been covered before. I've been really wanting to get a Nikon Coolscan device, probably the LS-50 or the LS-5000. Is it worth getting? I don't really have space for a dslr set up, I just want something simple that gets good results. Any thoughts on this? Thanks.
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Old 02-21-2020   #2
Fraser
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I still use mine, and will keep using it until it dies its a coolscan V, sometimes wish it was a 5000 so I could do a whole roll in one go. Nikon no longer support the software so its easier using Vuescan or like I do silverfast unless you use an older computer. I may be more inclined to go for a Plustek as you can probably get a new one for the price of a secondhand coolscan.
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Old 02-21-2020   #3
steveyork
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Nikon no longer supports their software. So you'll have to use an old computer or third party software like Vuescan. I use the Vuescan. It's ok for B&W. Scans everything very flat, but contrast can be added, and it does get the coolscan resolution. Mine in a 9000 which I got right at the end, in circa 2010. I've scanned 100-300 rolls (mostly 35mm but some MF) of film a year (not all the frames of course) w/o any problems. I found Vuescan less successful for color photos, but I don't shoot color anymore, nor do I really know how to use Vuescan to its' optimum. You definitely want a dedicated film scanner. If I was getting a new scanner today, Plustek is the name I would investigate.
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Old 02-21-2020   #4
Zonan
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What size film(s) and quantity are you looking to digitize? I think those are critical. A DSLR setup need not be that space consuming, even if you use a copy stand- the stand can be used for other purposes between scanning sessions. I had an LS-5000, sold it in 2010 to get an LS9000 (as they discontinued them). Just sold the LS9000 to go the DSLR route. The scanners are slow, parts/repairs are going to be a problem. Of the scanners, the LS5000 and Minolta are the best for 35mm; Plustek 8200 is a current model with warranty. Also maybe an Epson V700 or 800/850 could work if you are not going to print much above 11x14, granted not quite the same as the LS5000/Plustek et al.
I've given up on traditional scanning, but it may work for your needs. Good luck with this!
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Old 02-21-2020   #5
Andprayforrain
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If you intend to digitize BW negs, check out the camera scan examples in the other threads.

Nikon Coolscan Vs tend to overemphasize BW neg grain, and at an effective 3,900 pixels per inch they don't capture enough fine detail that can survive noise reduction. Even the merest noise reduction can make Coolscan V scans to look plastic.

Vince Lupo's recent BW neg scans in the Scanning with a Digital Camera thread appear to show finer detail and much better acutance than what my Coolscan V can deliver. His scans look much more photographic than my Coolscan's.

The Coolscan V does a great job with color slide film. The Coolscan 9000 does a better job with BW negs, mostly because (I think) it uses better light.
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Old 02-21-2020   #6
Huss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pushto1600 View Post
Hey guys. New member here so sorry if these topic has been covered before. I've been really wanting to get a Nikon Coolscan device, probably the LS-50 or the LS-5000. Is it worth getting? I don't really have space for a dslr set up, I just want something simple that gets good results. Any thoughts on this? Thanks.
A DSLR setup will take up less space. And will be guaranteed to work with full support. And can be used as a camera...
As good as those old scanners are, they are old scanners. Really old now.
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Old 02-21-2020   #7
pushto1600
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveyork View Post
Nikon no longer supports their software. So you'll have to use an old computer or third party software like Vuescan. I use the Vuescan. It's ok for B&W. Scans everything very flat, but contrast can be added, and it does get the coolscan resolution. Mine in a 9000 which I got right at the end, in circa 2010. I've scanned 100-300 rolls (mostly 35mm but some MF) of film a year (not all the frames of course) w/o any problems. I found Vuescan less successful for color photos, but I don't shoot color anymore, nor do I really know how to use Vuescan to its' optimum. You definitely want a dedicated film scanner. If I was getting a new scanner today, Plustek is the name I would investigate.
I was fiddling around on my computer (running windows 10) able to download NikonScan4 and everything seems to be working just fine... will i run into problems when I actually plug in a scanner?
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Old 02-21-2020   #8
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I shoot mostly 35mm, some medium format square via Rolleiflex which I'd rather send to a lab anyway. I've used the epson flatbeds, didn't like the results I got with 35mm but it was quite good with 120. If I may ask what's your DSLR scanning set up good sir?
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Old 02-21-2020   #9
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I love my Nikon Coolscan 9000ED, and though it is old, I've had no troubles with it. Scans come out great, both in medium format and 35mm. I also had a Coolscan V ED which was also great for my purposes, but sold it after getting the 9000. I probably should have kept it since it is a strip fed scanner, whereas the 9000 needs trays for 35mm. That said, scans do take a LONG time to finish depending on settings, but for me, the results are worth it and I just love having a huge clean file that I can work with later and for archiving purposes.

I have also toyed with the idea of getting a good DSLR setup, but at the same time, I just like having a powerful dedicated scanner to get as good a quality as I'm able without going through a lab and not shelling out for a drum scanner. To me, having a desktop scanner is just about right.

Edit: It should be noted that NikonScan software is no longer supported on current computers, so I'm using VueScan, and works great. The other thing to consider is that the output cable for the Nikon 9000 ED is an outdated Firewire IEEE 1394, so you gotta get a little creative to get it to work. I'm using it on a MacBook Pro with an adapter, and have had no issues.
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Old 02-21-2020   #10
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https://www.rangefinderforum.com/for...d.php?t=170320

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