Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Classic Film RangeFinders & Other Classics > Zeiss Contax

Zeiss Contax Forum for the classic Zeiss Contax I, II, III, IIa, IIIa , G series, and if you want to push it, the nice Contax point and shoots. Some spill over from the Kievs, the Soviet copy of the Contax II/III can also be expected. Plus the ONLY production camera ever made in classic Zeiss Contax Rangefinder mount WITH TTL metering ... the Voigtlander Bessa R2C.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Ikoflex (which one?)
Old 05-22-2018   #1
richardHaw
junk scavenger
 
richardHaw's Avatar
 
richardHaw is offline
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Tokyo
Posts: 417
Ikoflex (which one?)

Hello. I have searched the net but I still didn't get the answer that I wanted mainly due to the confusion over identifying models so I gave up and made a new thread here

the question is:

which ikoflex is the most reliable and easy to service? I have been itching to buy a TLR and Rolleiflex is just out of my paygrade.

I just want a decent 75mm Tessar and a reliable camera that I can hopefully repair back to working condition.
__________________
Take me down to the Parallax City
Where the viewfinder's tiny
And the framing is tricky
http://www.richardhaw.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-22-2018   #2
Robert Lai
Registered User
 
Robert Lai is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,634
Ivor Matanle had an entire article about the Ikoflexes here:
http://www.tlr-cameras.com/German/Ik...20Article.html


I once had an Ikoflex - can't remember the model. It felt rather frail, and had a dim screen. I had it overhauled, but it still didn't inspire confidence.


There are so many other choices out there.
I would try a Minolta Autocord, Rolleicord, or even a Mamiya C220 if you want inexpensive, high quality TLRs.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-23-2018   #3
Pioneer
Registered User
 
Pioneer's Avatar
 
Pioneer is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Age: 65
Posts: 3,112
I own two or three Ikoflex TLRs (the number varies based on which ones my grandson has borrowed). With the exception of the Favorit they are all pretty nice and supposedly are relatively easy to work on according to Mark Hansen. My Ikoflex IIa (late version) is undoubtedly the sharpest of my herd but they all produce pretty good results.


EDIT - Interestingly none of the ones I own, all picked up at various times on E-Bay, have required any service. None of them feel nearly as solid as my Rollieflex Automat but they are pretty tough little cameras none the less.
__________________
You gotta love a fast lens;

It is almost as good as a fast horse!
Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-24-2018   #4
02Pilot
Malcontent
 
02Pilot is offline
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NY, USA
Posts: 1,288
I have an Ikoflex Ic that's a very nice camera to use. The coated Tessar lens is really quite good, as you would expect. Mechanically, it's pretty simple and robust, though I did have to service mine for gummy lubricants. The ergonomics are good, but not great, and the layout is quirky, especially when it comes to resetting the film counter. Screen is pretty bright and the meter fairly accurate. I like it a lot, though it's maybe not the obvious choice given more conventional and also very good options from other manufacturers. Certainly I would suggest a later camera, and wait until you find one at a reasonable price - they are not nearly as sought after as some others, so sometimes they can be had for little money.
__________________
-------------------------------------------------------
Any man who can see what he wants to get on film will usually find some way to get it;
and a man who thinks his equipment is going to see for him is not going to get much of anything.

-Hunter S. Thompson
-
http://filmosaur.wordpress.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-24-2018   #5
Steve M.
Registered User
 
Steve M. is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,382
I've owned a number of those cameras, all w/ the lower end Novar lenses. I like the Novar, and it makes nice images if stopped down. The Ikoflex cameras are simple to service, as are most knob wind TLR's. TLR's are just basic box cameras w/ a separate focus lens. As mentioned, the focus screens are not the brightest, but if you have one w/ a good mirror it is easy enough to use.

The Ikoflex cameras are sorta heavy but generally inexpensive, except for the Tessar lens models that command higher prices. For a first TLR I would recommend a Rolleicord, and don't overlook the models w/ the 3 element Triotars. Those are wonderful lenses that are really sharp stopped down and make better portraits than the 4 element Tessars in my opinion. You can usually pick one up on eBay for $100-$125 in good shooting condition.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-24-2018   #6
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 37
Posts: 4,584
an ikoflex iia or a mpp microcord are my favorite rolleiflex alternatives because they both have dials to control exposure and are pretty undervalued for how nice they are.
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-24-2018   #7
ACullen
Registered User
 
ACullen is offline
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 158
I've the Ikoflex III from 1939. It has an uncoated tessar f2.8 80mm lens , which performs wonderfully. As I recall it was meant to compete with Rolleis of the time. Lever wind on, auto frame counting and a huge direct viewfinder which has parallax correction. It handles very sweetly and is much lighter than my 3.5f.

Build quality is good but not up to Rollei standards. I've yet to try mounting it on a tripod because the tripod fixing point is on the back door neither of which look too strong. The focussing screen is in my view quite bright. It's a tad behind the 3.5f but much better than my Yashica Mat 124.

I had to get light traps around the lens replaced because of a light leak but that aside it has worked flawlessly.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-25-2018   #8
steveyork
Registered User
 
steveyork is offline
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 697
We've had the following pass through the house: Flavorit (late 50's), III (1939), Ic (late 50's) and II/III (1937).

Forget why, but told to stay away from the Favorit and sold the same. Again second hand, but told the III was made fro soft metal, a war time production. After a test roll, ended up selling that one too.

My wife has put a lot of film through there Ic over several years. She really likes the camera and the coated Tessar taking lens. Easy to use, light, inboard meter that still works. After a couple years though, her negatives developed very fine vertical scratches. Almost like rain. I've would've never seen it, but you know these MF folks. They're always zooming in on their big negatives. Haven't figured out the issue yet.

The pre-war III/II takes fine pictues, but skips frames. Think the taking lens is the Triotar. Didn't have it fixed.

Build quality is excellent, with pre-war 'feeling' better made then the post-war. We have a Mamiya C220 and Rolliecord Vb in the house too, and the Ikoflex are as well made or better.

They're pretty inexpensive on the used market, but probably will need service. Fun cameras.
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-25-2018   #9
02Pilot
Malcontent
 
02Pilot is offline
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: NY, USA
Posts: 1,288
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveyork View Post

My wife has put a lot of film through there Ic over several years. She really likes the camera and the coated Tessar taking lens. Easy to use, light, inboard meter that still works. After a couple years though, her negatives developed very fine horizontal scratches. Almost like rain. I've would've never seen it, but you know these MF folks. There always zooming in on their big negatives. Haven't figured out the issue yet.
Mine did this quite severely when I got it. The problem was a roughness that developed - probably from oxidation - on something in the film chamber. I want to say it was one of the blackened edges of the film gate, but it's been a while and I don't have the camera with me at the moment. The solution was simply to polish with super fine 0000 steel wool until the roughness was eliminated. No problems since.

I am very interested in the Ikoflex III, though I suspect I'm more drawn by the aesthetics than anything else. As a camera seeing regular use, I think my Ic is probably better.
__________________
-------------------------------------------------------
Any man who can see what he wants to get on film will usually find some way to get it;
and a man who thinks his equipment is going to see for him is not going to get much of anything.

-Hunter S. Thompson
-
http://filmosaur.wordpress.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-25-2018   #10
Pioneer
Registered User
 
Pioneer's Avatar
 
Pioneer is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Age: 65
Posts: 3,112
The problem with the Favorit is that the shutter remains cocked when you finish a roll of film. The only way to release the shutter is to load another roll, fire the shutter, and do not advance the film until you are ready to shoot the next time. Of course, if you use it all the time the shutter is always getting exercised so it is not a problem. The obvious problem is that any Favorit you decide to buy will almost certainly have a cocked shutter and it could have been that way since great grandpa put it in the drawer in 1960. Additionally, the Favorit is somewhat rare so the prices usually reflect the collector value more than the user value.



All the Ikoflex camera I have owned have very bright focus screens, certainly brighter then any of my Rolleiflexes, and the cameras are lighter to carry around, again compared to Rolleiflex and Yashica Mat, which are the only other TLRs I have owned.


While the Ikoflex is not as heavy as a Rolleiflex it has the normal good Zeiss Ikon build quality so they usually work very well, especially if they have been recently serviced..



Most of the Tessar and Novar lenses I have used with these cameras are very good lenses, typical of all other Zeiss Ikon cameras that used these similar lenses.


If it works when you buy it then it will probably continue to work for quite some time. Remember, all of these TLR cameras have leaf shutters so they need exercise to keep working well. That is usually the number one problem with any TLR is that the camera has not been used in quite awhile so the shutters are usually very sticky and slow. Sometimes a bit of exercise will get them running again but sometimes a good cleaning is necessary.
__________________
You gotta love a fast lens;

It is almost as good as a fast horse!
Dan
  Reply With Quote

Old 05-25-2018   #11
steveyork
Registered User
 
steveyork is offline
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 697
Quote:
Originally Posted by 02Pilot View Post
Mine did this quite severely when I got it. The problem was a roughness that developed - probably from oxidation - on something in the film chamber. I want to say it was one of the blackened edges of the film gate, but it's been a while and I don't have the camera with me at the moment. The solution was simply to polish with super fine 0000 steel wool until the roughness was eliminated. No problems since.

I am very interested in the Ikoflex III, though I suspect I'm more drawn by the aesthetics than anything else. As a camera seeing regular use, I think my Ic is probably better.
Thanks. We'll give that repair a try.

Yes, the Ikoflex III must be one of the best looking TLRs of all time. And from out test roll, the uncoated Tessar had a pleasant vintage look. Recently saw a few on that big auction site. Maybe there is one there with your name on it.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:41.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.