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Polaroid auto 100 - shutter speed 10 secs - 1/1200?
Old 12-09-2011   #1
HLing
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Polaroid auto 100 - shutter speed 10 secs - 1/1200?

Still trying to figure out the proper exposures and exposure times for both fp3000 b and fp100c film. It turns out that fp3000b has a wider range of lighting possibilities, where as the fp100c seem almost impossible other than under bright sunny skies.....but looking at the landlist:
http://www.rwhirled.com/landlist/lan...cat-packfos100

it seems this camera is capable of shutter speed of 10 secs to 1/1200! So, there should be a way to use the color film for indoors without using a flash, right?

I took one picture with the L/D wheel turned to the lightest possible (4 notches) and set the bottom wheel at 75 (which is the slowest out of the 75, 150, 300 and 3000). I waited for the 2nd click of the shutter closing (it's definitely not 10 secs) though i could have put it on a tripod to be sure. The picture turned out pretty dim.

Does anyone know how to get the slower shutter speed, or whether the fp100c is just good for outdoors and flash? Thanks!
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Old 12-09-2011   #2
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dunno about the 100 specifically but I have a 250 and the longest shutter speed it'll do is alot longer than 10 seconds. just tried in my dim room (Lunasix says EV1 at ISO 100 - ~30 s at F/8) and the shutter was open for 23 seconds. film speed is set at 75, L/D set to +.5 (my usual setting for FP 100c)

maybe your battery is a little flat? my 250 normally underexposes but it's not that bad.

mind you with ISO 100 film and a f/8.8 lens, when you're indoors you'll probably want flash or a tripod. or spotlights or something.
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Old 12-09-2011   #3
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I just went through my manual for the 100 and there is no mention in the manual about 10 seconds. I also tried mine in low light and the shutter just froze open until I let off the shutter button. But in other low light (brighter than before) it did open for about 1 second.

I'm not sure about this but one of my newer cameras (Color Pack II) which was really cheap when I bought it ($29.95: 1970) does stay open for a longer period in dim light. So as 'Land's List' uses a lot of 'similar to model XXX' maybe the newer models do have the longer shutter speeds.
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Old 12-09-2011   #4
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Thank you both for your testing and replies!

I also did more testing where I put the switch for the light condition to the bottom one which, for color film is "..for dull day or with flash", and also I used one full spectrum light (Verilux, a cheaply made supposed full spectrum light) and one small desk lamp. It did help the situation somewhat.

I'll remember to keep in mind that this is an "electric eye" (Mooge, my battery is less than a month old, so I think i'm good there still) and continue to experiment. I wonder, Charjohncarter if there is a B setting where you mentioned that the shutter seemed to have froze for a while. Which of the two settings did you have the little squares on, top or bottom?
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Old 12-10-2011   #5
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I don't think there is a B setting, and I had mine on low light and at 75. But it does work like a bulb setting, if you close the meter off or use very low light.
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Old 12-10-2011   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
I don't think there is a B setting, and I had mine on low light and at 75. But it does work like a bulb setting, if you close the meter off or use very low light.
oh, wait, you mean just cover up the sensor! I'll give that a try. why didn't I think of that!? Thanks!
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Old 12-10-2011   #7
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Masking tape works or gaffers electrical. Use a tripod and practice with no film first, so you don't cause too much movement.
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Old 12-10-2011   #8
Robert Lai
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The problem is that the metering cell is a full area averaging meter. Even a small bright light in the periphery of the view will cause the cell to shorten the shutter speed.

Instead of fully blocking off the cell, you could try putting some exposed film, or an ND filter in front of it. The "cloud" orange filter for B+W photography has a little orange filter to go over the photocell also, to give automatic exposure compensation.

Easier option is to use some fill flash to even up the exposure.
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Old 12-13-2011   #9
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Robert, Thanks for the additional info. I hadn't thought of using exposed film as a filter before!

Charjohncarter, I definitely need to practice more without film.

Since last post I've got the return of the light flare problem when using the FP3000b under bright sun. I'm at a lost for where else to look.
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Old 12-13-2011   #10
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HLing, I had a light leak on my Automatic100. Two things to look for: first on the bottom of the bellows is a seam that joins the ends of the bellows cover, and second stick a flash light in the bellows in a dark room and check for pinholes in the bellows.

I used 'Black Silicone Adhesive' to seal both problems. Fixing a bellows is usually not permanent, but the covering for the 100 is a material that 'accepts' the adhesive very well and is flexible. With a little careful work and about 15 minutes you will be back in business quickly. The adhesive is messy so: old clothes and do it outdoors.
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