Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Rangefinder Forum > Photography General Interest

Photography General Interest Neat Photo stuff NOT particularly about Rangefinders.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

Movies for Photographers
Old 11-25-2014   #1
Asim
Registered User
 
Asim is offline
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 213
Movies for Photographers

Recently someone recommended the movie "Ida" for its excellent cinematography... something all photographers can relate to. The story itself is also very interesting. The director has a background in medium format photography and it shows throughout.

I was wondering what other movies you might recommend as a photographer. Preferably something with visual artistry (great cinematography) as well as a good story.

Movies I might put on this list are:

Raise the Red Lantern
Cinema Paradiso
Brokeback Mountain
Out of Africa
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
Motorcycle Diaries
The White Balloon

I think all of these are foreign films (if you're American) except for Out of Africa and Brokeback Mountain.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-25-2014   #2
JChrome
Street Worker
 
JChrome's Avatar
 
JChrome is offline
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: NYC
Posts: 821
La Jetee by Chris Marker. It's composed of stills, the basis for many movies about time travel, in French and is a great story. His other films are excellent as well :-).
__________________
www.stillthrill.com
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-25-2014   #3
maddoc
... likes film.
 
maddoc's Avatar
 
maddoc is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: 三鷹市
Age: 52
Posts: 7,233
I would add "Paris, Texas" by German director Wim Wenders, who is also an avid photographer (and Leica user).
__________________
- Gabor

flickr
pBase
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-25-2014   #4
danielsterno
making soup from mud
 
danielsterno's Avatar
 
danielsterno is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 824
Ida. outstanding film- for me it was a series of photographs that became a movie:

https://www.lensculture.com/articles...still-to-movie
__________________
imperfection is beauty,
madness is genius,
and its better to be absolutely ridiculous,
than absolutely boring.

pencil/paint/M6/M5/Fuji x100

flickr:https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-25-2014   #5
pharyngula
Registered User
 
pharyngula's Avatar
 
pharyngula is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 65
"The Great Beauty" is the most recent film I've seen that qualifies for me as a photographer's movie.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-25-2014   #6
ninjin
Registered User
 
ninjin's Avatar
 
ninjin is offline
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: London, UK
Posts: 43
Even though I am still somewhat undecided on what I think of the plot,
I found "The Grand Budapest Hotel" [1] to have excellent camera work.

[1]: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2278388/
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-26-2014   #7
Asim
Registered User
 
Asim is offline
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 213
thanks for the suggestions. too bad none of them are on netflix streaming!
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-26-2014   #8
ferider
Registered User
 
ferider's Avatar
 
ferider is offline
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 11,254
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddoc View Post
I would add "Paris, Texas" by German director Wim Wenders, who is also an avid photographer (and Leica user).
Yes !

Other favorites of mine:

- Hero
- Fargo
- The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (the original with Noomi Rapace)
- No Country for Old Men
- The Royal Tenenbaums and The Grand Budapest Hotel
: :

The more I think about it, the longer the list gets ....

Roland.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-26-2014   #9
Lauffray
Invisible Cities
 
Lauffray's Avatar
 
Lauffray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montreal
Age: 30
Posts: 1,434
The Return, The Banishement by Andrey Zvyagintsev
Three Colors by Krzysztof Kieslowski
Touch of Evil, The Third Man by Orson Welles
The Lives of Others by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
__________________

Website Flickr Insta
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-26-2014   #10
filmtwit
Desperate but not serious
 
filmtwit's Avatar
 
filmtwit is offline
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: West Coast
Posts: 2,770
See this thread
http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...d.php?t=134016
__________________
Instgram
https://www.instagram.com/filmtwit/

The Flickr Stream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/filmtwit/


The Blog (Boring Sidney, Boring)
http://jeffthomasallen.blogspot.com/
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-26-2014   #11
Taipei-metro
Registered User
 
Taipei-metro is offline
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 4,720
Follow the DP...

I like Wender's 'Million Dollar Hotel' a lot, dp is Phedon Papamichael,
his newest one is Clooney's (dir.), The Monuments Men,

or, 'Arizona Dream' directed by genius Emir Kusturica, dp is Vilko Filač...

'Chu-ju', 秋菊, 'Not One Less' dir. Zhang Yi-mo, just great movies and great cinema photography

'Legend of 1900', dp Lajos Koltai, directed by Cinema Paradiso's Giuseppe Tornatore, great director, great cinema photography!

Each and every Kurosawa movie, for start, Sanjuro, Yojinbo, Red Beard, Throne of Blood, and his first color movie Dodeskaden...

Another great Japanese director is Imamura Shohe 今村昌平, check out his 'black rain' (no, not that mike douglas movie), 'eel'

latest I found is Yamada Yoji's 'A Distance Cry from Spring'
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #12
Rob-F
Likes Leicas
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Age: 77
Posts: 5,408
"The world Of Suzie Wong." Warner Brothers, 1960; Nancy Kwan (her first film), William Holden. Filmed in Hong Kong. Visually gorgeous and a fine story. I remembered it from years ago and was able to get it from Amazon. They don't keep it in stock but the studio will make a one-off DVD to order!
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #13
Swift1
Registered User
 
Swift1's Avatar
 
Swift1 is offline
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,426
Two of my favorites for cinematography

Hero - with Jet Li

The Black Stallion
__________________
Colton

If you're gonna shoot, shoot, don't talk. The Ugly
My Flickr
My Website
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #14
Mlehrman
Mlehrman
 
Mlehrman is offline
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New York City
Posts: 717
Shanghai Express. Drop-dead gorgeous.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #15
peterm1
Registered User
 
peterm1's Avatar
 
peterm1 is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,542
If you are into Saul Leiter and the wonderful reflections and colors he used extensively try watching the 2015 movie "Carol" which is set in the 1950s and according to the cinematographer consciously used the Leiter style in the movie. Wonderfully evocative. One of the main characters is a keen amateur photographer - albeit only using an old Argus "brick"
Watch the movie trailer at the following link to see what I mean.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2402927/

Save
Save
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #16
peterm1
Registered User
 
peterm1's Avatar
 
peterm1 is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,542
Another wonderful movie that is a personal favourite of mine which has some very beautiful cinematography that any stills photographer would learn from, is Twilight Samurai by Yoji Yamada. In fact his trilogy of Samurai movies which also includes Love and Honor and Hidden Blade are great too.

But I love the slow moments in Twilight Samurai when he focuses in on the little things of life and you get to see the minutiae of life as a petty Samurai in 1860's Japan just as it is all about to change forever. It is one of the great movies of all time in my book.

You will also learn a lot about the use of shadows and light by watching this movie.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZNKUl4hfjw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op4KVD-9p2Q
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #17
Rangefinder 35
Registered User
 
Rangefinder 35's Avatar
 
Rangefinder 35 is offline
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Seattle, Washington.
Posts: 306
"Fur" with Nicole Kidman and Robert Downey Jr. for story. Zatoichi the Blind Swordsman (2004) by Beat Kitano for photography.
__________________
Contax G2, G1, 21/2.8, 28/2.8, 35/2, 45/2, 90/2.8, Leica M6 Ti, 24/2.8 Elmarit-M ASPH, 85/4 ZM Tele-Tessar. Nikon F5, 21/2.8 F Distagon, 50/2.0 F Planar, 100/2.0 F Macro-Planar, 180/2.8 ED Nikkor.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #18
bayernfan
Registered User
 
bayernfan is offline
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 440
most recently, Frantz. Gorgeous movie. Personally, it's a must own.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5029608/?ref_=nv_sr_1



__________________
M_V instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #19
Ko.Fe.
Me. Write ESL. Ko.
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Age: 51
Posts: 5,790
The Third Man.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #20
Rob-F
Likes Leicas
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Age: 77
Posts: 5,408
"Midnight in Paris" by Woody Allen. Beautiful cinematography!
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-13-2017   #21
Huss
Registered User
 
Huss is offline
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Venice, CA
Posts: 5,485
Dr. Strange
Dr. Strangelove
Dude Where's My Car?
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #22
petronius
Registered User
 
petronius's Avatar
 
petronius is offline
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Southern Germany
Age: 54
Posts: 2,007
"Paterson" and all the other movies by Jim Jarmusch
__________________
My tumblr

My Rollei 35 tumblr
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #23
emraphoto
Registered User
 
emraphoto's Avatar
 
emraphoto is offline
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,510
The Rover

Film as only film can render
__________________
www.johndensky.ca
@eastofadelaide
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #24
peterm1
Registered User
 
peterm1's Avatar
 
peterm1 is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,542
Another film to watch is The Good German. Reportedly shot in black and white on pre war lenses to give the correct look a la The Third Man.

"The film was shot in black-and-white and is designed to imitate the appearance of film noir from the 1940s, although it also includes material – such as sex scenes and swearing – that would have been prohibited by the Production Code. Its poster is an homage to the poster for the classic film Casablanca (1942, also a Warner Bros. film), as is the closing scene at an airport. The DVD release presents the film in the 1.33:1 aspect ratio which declined in use from about 1953, though the theatrical release, and other DVD Releases, used the slightly more modern but still unusual 1.66:1 ratio. The film received mixed reviews and grossed $5.9 million worldwide against a budget of $32 million."


  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #25
eckhardf
Registered User
 
eckhardf is offline
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 12
The Cook The Thief His Wife and Her Lover by Peter Greenaway.

Incredible sense of colour and compostion and a deeply evocative story... what's not to like!?...
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #26
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 4,805
Chinatown
The Road Home
Virgin Spring
Mirror

Lots of others of course.....
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #27
willwright
Registered User
 
willwright is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 36
Barry Lyndon...Kubrick's epic...you don't have to sit through the whole thing
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #28
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,884
Solaris and Stalker by Andrei Tarkovsky.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #29
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,884
Three Seasons by Tony Bui.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #30
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,884
The Scent of Green Papaya and The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Trần Anh Hng.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #31
CK Dexter Haven
Registered User
 
CK Dexter Haven is offline
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,446
There's a tv series on Amazon called The Collection. Post WWII Paris, and the photographer shoots a lot like an Avedon/Doisneau hybrid with a Rolleiflex. The (faked) presentation of his shooting perspective, through the viewfinder, is really well done.

And, of course, there's the Sebastiao Salgado documentary, The Salt of the Earth.
And the Richard Avedon documentary, Darkness and Light.

For sheer creativity, i love The Grand Budapest Hotel by Wes Anderson.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #32
PKR
Registered User
 
PKR is offline
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,321
Any film made/shot by Haskell Wexler or any film made by Stanley Kubrick. Particularly "Barry Lyndon".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haskell_Wexler

http://filmmakermagazine.com/93683-h.../#.WeLMc2Be4mg


Kubrick's f/0.7 lenses now available for rent
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/98...tart-saving-up


"When you here the Stanley Kubrick you think of images. One of the many reasons Kubrick was such a remarkable filmmaker was that he came to the film industry after years working as a professional photographer for publications like Look magazine. There he learned about composition, light and of course lenses."

"Stanley lit mostly with natural light when he could–because of his photojournalism career. Sometimes the flicker of a candle is all the light he would have, which led to the use of a the legendary Zeiss lens designed for NASA as a way shooting the deep darkness of space–Kubrick used it for the evening dining room scenes in Barry Lyndon in order to capture candlelight on the slower film stocks of the day."

https://indiefilmhustle.com/stanley-kubrick-lenses/
X
__________________
The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera. Dorothea Lange
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-14-2017   #33
bluesun267
Registered User
 
bluesun267's Avatar
 
bluesun267 is offline
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 205
I don't think any understanding of cinema/photographic technique is complete without seeing the work of cinematographers/filmmakers: Conrad Hall, Gabriel Fiqueroa, Vilmos Zsigmond, Stan Brakhage, Bruce Baillie, Gregory Markopolous, and George Kuchar.

And of course there is the quintessential photographer's thriller, Blow-Up (1966) by Michaelangelo Antonioni (lots of Nikon F porn in that one)


Last edited by bluesun267 : 10-14-2017 at 20:05. Reason: add photo
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-15-2017   #34
peterm1
Registered User
 
peterm1's Avatar
 
peterm1 is offline
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 4,542
Quote:
Originally Posted by PKR View Post
Any film made/shot by Haskell Wexler or any film made by Stanley Kubrick. Particularly "Barry Lyndon".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haskell_Wexler

http://filmmakermagazine.com/93683-h.../#.WeLMc2Be4mg


Kubrick's f/0.7 lenses now available for rent
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/98...tart-saving-up


"When you here the Stanley Kubrick you think of images. One of the many reasons Kubrick was such a remarkable filmmaker was that he came to the film industry after years working as a professional photographer for publications like Look magazine. There he learned about composition, light and of course lenses."

"Stanley lit mostly with natural light when he could–because of his photojournalism career. Sometimes the flicker of a candle is all the light he would have, which led to the use of a the legendary Zeiss lens designed for NASA as a way shooting the deep darkness of space–Kubrick used it for the evening dining room scenes in Barry Lyndon in order to capture candlelight on the slower film stocks of the day."

https://indiefilmhustle.com/stanley-kubrick-lenses/
X
In general Kubrick was a fanatic who was obsessive for details. In addition to shooting more or less wholly in available light including candle light for many interior scenes he wanted the film to look authentic in its period details. For example he arranged for hundreds if not thousands of military uniforms to be made and what got me us that the British red coats were dyed in the original organic natural dies. it shows very clearly in the final result as modern crimson is much more vivid, colorful and much less authentic.The movie is a cinematic wonder.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-15-2017   #35
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 5,033
Camera Buff by Krzysztof Kieslowski

Everlasting Moments by Jan Troell

For the visuals
Apocalypse Now by Coppola

Citizen Kane by Orson Wells

The Man Who Wasn't There The Coen Brothers

Kubrik was a genius. Most anything that he directed.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-15-2017   #36
aizan
Registered User
 
aizan's Avatar
 
aizan is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Torrance, CA
Age: 36
Posts: 4,201
for the street photographers out there, the surreptitious footage and street scenes in "under the skin" are a real treat!
__________________
Ugly Cameras
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-16-2017   #37
airfrogusmc
Registered User
 
airfrogusmc is offline
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 5,033
Everybody Street by Cheryl Dunn
Interviews with Bruce Davidson, Jill Freedman, Boogie, Meyerowitz and many others along with a lot of history.

Also for visuals Raging Bull by Martin Scorsese
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-16-2017   #38
valdas
Registered User
 
valdas is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,273
Days of Heaven by Terrence Malick. I think it won the Academy award for Cinematography (Nestor Almendros). The soundtrack (Ennio Morricone) is also a masterpiece...
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-16-2017   #39
Lauffray
Invisible Cities
 
Lauffray's Avatar
 
Lauffray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Montreal
Age: 30
Posts: 1,434
Chungking Express, In the Mood for Love by Wong-Kar Wai (eternally grateful to my gf for having introduced me to WKW)
The Shining by Kubrick
Stranger Than Paradise, Jim Jarmusch
__________________

Website Flickr Insta
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-16-2017   #40
lamefrog
Registered User
 
lamefrog is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: New York City
Posts: 118
I stop movies all the time to capture a still when I find the photography inspiring.

If you like japanese photography do not miss anything from these directors -

Seijun Suzuki (Tokyo Drifter)

Shohei Imamura (The Eel , Intentions of Murder, The Insect Woman)

also

Pasolini
__________________
philippe | mono(dot)nyc
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:24.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.