Good news on the film front from Hollywood
Old 10-07-2015   #1
muser53
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Good news on the film front from Hollywood

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/beh...esident-830106
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Old 10-07-2015   #2
bluesun267
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Another top-level management position at Kodak...sounds like more of that famous tried-and-failed business as usual. Wonder how much he makes? Bet it's enough to keep at least one film emulsion in production rather than be discontinued. Not that there's many left.
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Old 10-08-2015   #3
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Looks like movie makers will save film from extinction:

"All or parts of the following movies were photographed with film by some leading cinematographers: Hail, Caesar!, lensed by Roger Deakins (Skyfall); The Hateful Eight, photographed by Robert Richardson (Hugo); Love and Mercy, Robert Yeoman (The Grand Budapest Hotel); The Accountant, Seamus McGarvey (The Avengers); Entourage, Steven Fierberg (Love & Other Drugs); Spectre, Hotye van Hoytema (Interstellar); Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, Larry Fong (300); Joy, Linus Sandgren (American Hustle); Trainwreck, Jody Lee Lipes (Girls); and Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Daniel Mindel (Star Trek: Into Darkness).

For Danny Boyle's Steve Jobs, cinematographer Alwin H. Kuchler (Sunshine) is using 16mm and 35mm as well as digital to show the decades of Steve Jobs' life with different looks, Kodak reported."

quoted from this article: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/beh...ts-drum-800603
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Old 10-08-2015   #4
JP Owens
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I suspect there are cinematographers who are more nostalgic for film than anyone watching the movies they make. I would guess 99 percent of the people can't tell the difference between "real" film stock and a good LUT and expert color grading.

We are in a "niche" time frame when there is still enough cultural memory of film to interest some young people in playing with it. But, in another generation, even that will have faded. Attention spans are incredibly short these days.

Fortunately, at my age, I'll likely not survive this niche!
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Old 10-08-2015   #5
wblynch
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Problem is trying to find a venue where one can view a movie on film. The digital projectors I've sen lately are still sad, weak pretenders to the beauty of a projected film print.
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Old 10-08-2015   #6
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I have a good DVD of the film "Gosford Park" (2001). No digital movie comes close to its refined tonality, light effects and color even it is only a DVD.

Erik.
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Old 10-08-2015   #7
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The majority of these folks shooting film (Deakins, Abrams etc) cite archive issues as a major factor.

The Rover (brilliant Australian film) is an exceptional example of the capability of film.
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Old 10-08-2015   #8
bluesun267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JP Owens View Post
I would guess 99 percent of the people can't tell the difference between "real" film stock and a good LUT and expert color grading.
You just nailed one of Hollywood's big reasons (or apologies) for the conversion to digital cinema. Sure it sounds like fair and democratic deference the masses, the 'average' movie-goer, etc. Imagine if every industry operated that way...medicine, courts, the airlines...we could just dispense with specialized skills and even general education...I think they already made a movie about it called Idiocracy.
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Old 10-08-2015   #9
emraphoto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesun267 View Post
You just nailed one of Hollywood's big reasons (or apologies) for the conversion to digital cinema. Sure it sounds like fair and democratic deference the masses, the 'average' movie-goer, etc. Imagine if every industry operated that way...medicine, courts, the airlines...we could just dispense with specialized skills and even general education...I think they already made a movie about it called Idiocracy.
Indeed! A bloody bugger it is.
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