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Mamiya C330 kit-building advice
Old 07-07-2016   #1
unixrevolution
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Mamiya C330 kit-building advice

Hey all!

Saw a Mamiya C330 on Letgo today, and had to have it. Got a Canon SLR and a Petri fixed-lens RF along with it, but the Mamiya is the gem.

Anyone have any advice for what lenses to get for it? I have the 80/2.8 set, but I'm wondering if anybody has specific reccomendations.

Samples are always good!

Also, is the metered prism worth it?
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Old 07-07-2016   #2
someonenameddavid
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No, the metered prism is not worth it, unless it is ridiculously cheap. I would buy the last version of the 105, the DS. It is a Heliar formula and I would use it for portraits wide open.
But that's just me. If I fell upon a good deal I wold buy the 180 and the 55.

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Old 07-07-2016   #3
leicapixie
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First shoot some film and see if everything works!
It's a real pro camera, with great lens interchangeability.
Mine was a Fashion and Publicity rig.
A portrait lens a must.
I used the 135mm(good) but preferred the 180mm(excellent).
For wide I used the 65mm, but there may be a length shorter.
The Porroflex is useless.
A real prism OK, but this camera benefits from waist level reversed viewing.
It's darn heavy so go easy on a great collection of lenses and accessories.
My C3, then C33 and finally C330 were usually on a tripod in my studio.

Enjoy and make great exposures.
Unlike a Rollei, this camera becomes a fitness program for free.
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Old 07-07-2016   #4
unixrevolution
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Quote:
Originally Posted by someonenameddavid View Post
No, the metered prism is not worth it, unless it is ridiculously cheap. I would buy the last version of the 105, the DS. It is a Heliar formula and I would use it for portraits wide open.
But that's just me. If I fell upon a good deal I wold buy the 180 and the 55.

David
Thanks! I was wondering, as the metered prism is the business on my 6x7. I won't be going for one unless it's a cheapie, and works. What about the unmetered one?

The 105 DS is on my list now, as well as one of the two wides, and the long one. I think the 55 is my style, I like wideness in my lenses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leicapixie View Post
First shoot some film and see if everything works!
It's a real pro camera, with great lens interchangeability.
Mine was a Fashion and Publicity rig.
A portrait lens a must.
I used the 135mm(good) but preferred the 180mm(excellent).
For wide I used the 65mm, but there may be a length shorter.
The Porroflex is useless.
A real prism OK, but this camera benefits from waist level reversed viewing.
It's darn heavy so go easy on a great collection of lenses and accessories.
My C3, then C33 and finally C330 were usually on a tripod in my studio.

Enjoy and make great exposures.
Unlike a Rollei, this camera becomes a fitness program for free.
I've given it a good inspection and I'm 100% sure it's good to go, but I will definitely be shooting before I buy anything else, just to make sure the camera and I will bond.

I have had my eye on the 180, so I guess that's another vote for it!

It *is* heavy, but I shoot a 6x7, a 3x4 Graflex, a bunch of Polaroids, a 4x7 and an 8x10, so I have a different limit for heavy and bulky than most That said, I am planning on a 3, *maybe* four-lens setup.

As for the wideness, there is the 55 and 65, so I will see which of those makes the images I like.

Thanks for the replies and keep 'em comin!
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Old 07-07-2016   #5
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Pick up a Paramender. The parallax bar is nice but you can't beat a paramender for precise closeups and portraits.
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Old 07-07-2016   #6
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In addition to 80mm I also have 105mm DS, 180mm Super and 55mm. All of them are fantastic lenses.
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Old 07-08-2016   #7
BernardL
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Quote:
Anyone have any advice for what lenses to get for it?
How can we give advice not knowing what you intend to use it for? No clue except for the appearance of "wilderness" in your second post. For this kind of photography, the 55 is a must, IMO. A very trivial and practical consideration: filter diameters. 55, 80, 135 (my kit) all use 46mm.
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Old 07-08-2016   #8
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I did some incredible work with a C330f back in the late 1990s. I did my graduation project from art school with it. I've always regretted selling it, which I had to do after graduating because I couldn't find a job and needed to eat. I use a Mamiya 6 now, but I still miss my C330f.

My advice is forget the eye level finders. The porroflex is incredibly dim and gives a very small image that is hard to focus. The prism is better but heavy, and messes up the balance of the camera if you want to handhold it.

The 80mm lens is incredibly sharp. In the center, it actually beat the Hasselblad 80mm I had for awhile, though in the corners the Hasselblad lens is sharper.

I had the 55mm lens too, but didn't use it often. It was a good lens; I just hadn't figured out how to use a wideangle with square format. Today, I use the 50mm Mamiya 6 lens almost as much as I use the 80.

If you do much closeup work, the paramender that RichL recommended is a must-have. The C330 with a paramender is one of the best 6x6 setups for closeup work; the 80mm focuses incredibly close.


An example of a very close-range photo. This is the door handle of an old car. Done with the 80mm lens.


One of my favorite photographs. I made it in 1998, 18 years ago, for my art school thesis project. Made with the 80mm lens.

You can see the rest of my thesis project, all made with the C330f and 80mm lens, here:
http://chriscrawfordphoto.com/chris-...hp?category=60
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Old 07-08-2016   #9
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Much good advice from all.
The 55mm, the paramender(really needed), practical use.

I forgot a very important fact.
The Film runs in a straight line, spool to spool.
The Pentax 6x7 same.
It allows the Mamiya-C and Pentax- 6x7 lenses,
to have equal or greater sharpness,
than the Zeiss lenses on Hasselblad* and Rolleiflex TLR.
I still use my Rollei, the Hasselblad I avoided, due to MY focusing problems.
The latter cameras are affected by the curled films.
My pro work in large prints, were simply wonderful.
Like others I miss my Mamiya C system.
Sadly weight has become a factor after a heart excitement.
The Zeiss lenses are still stunning, with almost no distortion!
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Old 07-08-2016   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post
Pick up a Paramender. The parallax bar is nice but you can't beat a paramender for precise closeups and portraits.
I had considered it, but will now make it an essential, especially with Chris's post about how good the thing is at close-up work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by valdas View Post
In addition to 80mm I also have 105mm DS, 180mm Super and 55mm. All of them are fantastic lenses.
That sounds like the 4-lens setup I will eventually want to have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BernardL View Post
How can we give advice not knowing what you intend to use it for? No clue except for the appearance of "wilderness" in your second post. For this kind of photography, the 55 is a must, IMO. A very trivial and practical consideration: filter diameters. 55, 80, 135 (my kit) all use 46mm.
True enough. And in this case, it's probably for landscapes and portraits more than anything. maybe some street photography I do agree that I will probably end up wanting and loving a 55, and that info about the filter diameters is quite useful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
I did some incredible work with a C330f back in the late 1990s. I did my graduation project from art school with it. I've always regretted selling it, which I had to do after graduating because I couldn't find a job and needed to eat. I use a Mamiya 6 now, but I still miss my C330f.

My advice is forget the eye level finders. The porroflex is incredibly dim and gives a very small image that is hard to focus. The prism is better but heavy, and messes up the balance of the camera if you want to handhold it.

The 80mm lens is incredibly sharp. In the center, it actually beat the Hasselblad 80mm I had for awhile, though in the corners the Hasselblad lens is sharper.

I had the 55mm lens too, but didn't use it often. It was a good lens; I just hadn't figured out how to use a wideangle with square format. Today, I use the 50mm Mamiya 6 lens almost as much as I use the 80.

If you do much closeup work, the paramender that RichL recommended is a must-have. The C330 with a paramender is one of the best 6x6 setups for closeup work; the 80mm focuses incredibly close.


An example of a very close-range photo. This is the door handle of an old car. Done with the 80mm lens.


One of my favorite photographs. I made it in 1998, 18 years ago, for my art school thesis project. Made with the 80mm lens.

You can see the rest of my thesis project, all made with the C330f and 80mm lens, here:
http://chriscrawfordphoto.com/chris-...hp?category=60
Thank you for sharing your work, and the advice about the prism finders. I will probably end up with one eventually just to try it, but it's not a priority.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leicapixie View Post
Much good advice from all.
The 55mm, the paramender(really needed), practical use.

I forgot a very important fact.
The Film runs in a straight line, spool to spool.
The Pentax 6x7 same.
It allows the Mamiya-C and Pentax- 6x7 lenses,
to have equal or greater sharpness,
than the Zeiss lenses on Hasselblad* and Rolleiflex TLR.
I still use my Rollei, the Hasselblad I avoided, due to MY focusing problems.
The latter cameras are affected by the curled films.
My pro work in large prints, were simply wonderful.
Like others I miss my Mamiya C system.
Sadly weight has become a factor after a heart excitement.
The Zeiss lenses are still stunning, with almost no distortion!
That is good to know, and my other big medium-format system is, in fact, a 6x7. They have legendary film flatness, enough so to make them prefered for astronomic observation. "If the lens has its own building, it probably has a 6x7 on the other end" a friend once said to me.

Thanks everyone for your input! It's all been very useful.
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Old 07-08-2016   #11
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Just a small warning about the 180mm lens--look at the glass very carefully before you buy. Over the years I've had 3, and they all had a fogging problem between two of the (sealed) elements. I took the last one to my repairman who told me it couldn't be fixed; and said he'd seen the same thing with other similar lenses.

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Old 07-08-2016   #12
Ko.Fe.
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Just try it first. It might go on LetGo after it, you never know.
Where are samples on Flickr on dedicated group.
Mine was working after light seals replacement, btw.
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Old 07-08-2016   #13
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Congratulations on the purchase of a great camera!

The 105mm lens also takes 46mm filters (like the 55, 80, and 135).

The 65mm, 180mm, and 250mm lenses take 49mm filters*.

*I have a 180mm f4.5 Super and the filter threads are very thin because they are so close together, so each has a little threaded ring that fits into it for reinforcement/protection. Mamiya made special, very thin 49mm filters that could be fitted to both viewing and taking lenses simultaneously. If you remove both threaded protection rings, you can fit a standard 49mm filter to the taking lens only, but the Mamiya lens hood (mine is a rectangular hood that shades both lenses) will not fit over it. (Note: I just tried removing both protection rings, fitting a standard 49mm Hoya filter to the taking lens, and mounting a threaded collapsible lens hood intended for a 50mm lens on a 35mm SLR. This appeared to work well. The lens hood appeared to block a bit of the viewing lens, but I observed no loss in viewing. The collapsible lens hood isn't as deep as the Mamiya hood for this lens, so it should cause no vignetting.)

Another work-around for this situation is that the rectangular/twin-lens Mamiya hood for the 180mm lens has a threaded fitting inside the hood that accepts any 48mm filter over the taking lens.

Question for Mamiya TLR cognoscenti: Does anyone know what the difference is between the 180mm and 180mm Super?

- Murray
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Old 07-09-2016   #14
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Good advice from everyone. I have all the Mamiya C lenses, and tend to choose a different one for every roll. My Flickr page (chapelcross12) shows the results.
All the lenses are excellent. I probably use the 250mm the least, owing to its maximum opening of f/6.3. The 180, 105DS (heliar), 80 and 55 are particularly good.
For careful focusing, I now like the glass prism eye-level finder, the magnifying finder, and the metered magnifying finder.
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Old 07-09-2016   #15
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Got a C330 with all the lenses except the 250. Can't say they ever dissapionted me. The weight is in the body, not the lenses like in a slr kit. Never got on with the prism as it is too dark.
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Old 07-09-2016   #16
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Note that the Porroflex is a mirrored finder, not a solid glass prism. It is indeed a dark and small image, but the glass prism finder is not.
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Old 07-09-2016   #17
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I had the C2, C3, C33, C330, C330F & C330S bodies. Shot quite a lot of weddings with them. And a lot of personal work. Interchangeable camera bodies instead of interchangeable backs. Lenses 55mm, 65mm, 80mm, 105mm, 135mm, 180mm and 250mm. And all of the accessories. It's all good workhorse equipment. For personal work the C2 & C33 were my favorites; particularly the original C2 Mamiyaflex. I switched to Hasselblad later on but these cameras have a lot going for them; Sometimes I really do miss them.

The stovepipe finder is the one to get IMO; it has a 6X flip-in magnifier that is the bomb.
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Old 07-09-2016   #18
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I had a C330 with the 80mm and 55mm lenses that I used for hiking. Very heavy (I was a lot younger) to lug about. So, I sold it for a Mamiya 6.
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Old 07-22-2016   #19
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Points well taken about the prism vs mirroed finders, and the chimney finder. Once I sell some things and get more capital I'll be stalking the Bay for some of it.

Just got the 180 lenses off eBay, the Super edition. I haven't shot anything with them yet, but it seems really awesome. I've shot two rolls with the 80 already. I dig it.
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Old 07-30-2016   #20
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I got (for dirt cheap) a C330 with chrome 80, and the prism finder. It's true that the prism finder throws the balance off, but it's useful. However, if you use it, I find that I really need the side hand grip; otherwise, it's just awkward to use.

I have the metered finder also, and while it's a little dim, it works pretty darn well. Like so much of the design of this system, it's simple but effective.

I tend to not like to use tripods (I know; a compromise on my part), so I have never used the paramender. But more than once I have found that I've cut off the top of images when focusing closely -- easy to do this, even though the C330 has a green bar that comes down from the top of the frame to supposedly show you the parallax correction. You need to overcompensate in the framing, I find.

No one has talked yet about the difference in the newer (black finish) and older (chrome finish) lenses. The older lenses are fully compatible with the newer bodies, with maybe an exception (the longer lenses maybe?). But if you find one of these in good shape, don't hesitate -- I have heard it said, and I think my experience corroborates, that they can be actually sharper than the black finish lenses. Just be aware that parts are not available for the chrome finish lenses.

I don't know the difference between the older 180 and the 180 Super, but I have a couple of the older 180s (one of them with some serious haze that cannot be removed) and they are fine lenses. I can't see an obvious improvement in the Super.
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Old 07-30-2016   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMur12 View Post
Question for Mamiya TLR cognoscenti: Does anyone know what the difference is between the 180mm and 180mm Super?

- Murray
Super has 5 elements instead of 4 for making it slightly shorter and lighter. I owned both versions, both are sharp lenses and I actually kept the older (4 element) version myself because I feel it has perfect bokeh.
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Old 07-30-2016   #22
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Thanks, flavio81 and KoNickon, for feedback about the 180 and the 180 Super lenses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNickon View Post
...
No one has talked yet about the difference in the newer (black finish) and older (chrome finish) lenses. The older lenses are fully compatible with the newer bodies, with maybe an exception (the longer lenses maybe?). But if you find one of these in good shape, don't hesitate -- I have heard it said, and I think my experience corroborates, that they can be actually sharper than the black finish lenses. Just be aware that parts are not available for the chrome finish lenses. ...
I have a 135mm chrome lens that cannot be used on my C330f. The shutter cocking lever is located such that it is in conflict with the camera's automatic shutter-cocking device and there is no way that the two of them can coexist in the same space. The lens works fine on the old Mamiyaflex that it came with and with my C220f, neither of which has automatic shutter cocking.

- Murray
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Old 07-30-2016   #23
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Ah, Erik, the joy of a Mamiya C330. There's been many a time I've missed mine, but not enough to buy that kit again. Don't get me wrong, if it wasn't for the cost, I'd have another C330F right now. But I've gotten into other things since the those days, so I don't think it will ever happen again for me.

The times were great while they lasted though. Even twenty years ago when I was out shooting mine, people would be amazed I was using such an archaic piece of equipment. And that made it all the better for me. Add a Sunpak 611 potato smasher with the coiled cords and external battery pack, and you'll look like an old Press photographer. Oh, and you'll need a very large bag to carry it all in.

I've got a Paramender lying around here you can have. It's an earlier model, but should work well with the C330. I'll have to find it first, so I'll PM you for an address when I do.

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Street shooter
Old 07-31-2016   #24
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Street shooter

While it is heavy, don't sell it short as it is quite portable. Look at photos of Diane Arbus in the early sixties and you'll see her with her big Mamiya and flash setup. I don't believe that she was a particularly big, muscular person.

That said, while I got some great results with it, I don't miss it as it was a beast to carry around.
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Old 07-31-2016   #25
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Here's a nice read on the Mamiya C33 -- One of my favorites and a rapid-fire workhorse. If you want 220 buy the 220 Back which interchanges.

Diane Arbus is here too; nice photo of her with C33; I know I have owned and used the same and it is great stuff to use; photo by Gary Winogrand

The covering on this camera is grey rubber with thousands of little capital-letter "M"s Always thought that was too cool

This gear is bulky but not excessively heavy; I carried four of them at a time when photographing weddings.

https://greg-neville.com/2011/11/25/...cameras-no-11/
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Old 07-31-2016   #26
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I have a C220 and I will not add to the advice given on the lenses except to say that all the Seiko lenses I have for my M are all excellent. I will suggest the plain eye level prism for anyone who has the problem (as I do) of keeping hand held shots level. I find it invaluable and doesn't add that much bulk nor weight.
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Old 07-31-2016   #27
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Ok, now that i'm sitting at my laptop let me give you a review of what you need to know about the Mamiya system so you don't need to go through the (excellent) Mamiya TLR FAQ out there on the web.

Lightest camera is the C220, particularly the latest versions
Cutest camera is the Mamiyaflex C2
Heaviest is the C33 but then it is built like a tank.
C330S cameras have interchangeable screens that do not fit the C330F and C330 cameras.

As for the lenses there are at least 3 series of lenses:
- Early chrome lenses with top 1/400 speed, those are antique stuff but why not try it? They are marked with the Focal length in cm.
- "Chrome" lenses with 1/500 top speed, they are compact and nice. Some of them have the focal length in cm.
- "Black" lenses, have a shutter that is a bit more silent and with better ergonomics. Later of those lenses have a blue dot on the shutter cocking lever which means NOTHING so don't pay a premium. Ok, it does mean that the shutter is of a later design but all those shutters (chrome included) are reliable and easy to service so don't worry.

All the lenses are coated but apparently only the 80/2.8 "S" was multicoated. But this does not matter at all to be honest.

So the lenses:
NOTE: Optical designs between the chrome lenses and black lenses are unchanged unless noted.

55mm is perhaps the most expensive, it is very low on distortion but if you like pin sharp corners you need to stop down to f11. Being f4.5 and wideangle it is difficult to focus.

65mm has a wideangle effect, is sharp, easy to use. A great alternative to the 80mm lens. But it flares with the sun outdoors so use the custom hood or be careful with the sun.

80mm is general purpose but the alternative is the 65mm or the

105mm is great for portraits and general purpose although for focusing it requires the front to be racked way forward than the 80mm or 65mm so balance is not so good as in the other lenses. There are two optical versions of it:
- the chrome lens version is 4 elements, tessar design, has excellent bokeh in the "tessar" look.
- the black version also exists in 4 element
- the black version "DS" or "D" is a different 5 element, heliar design, lens; has excellent bokeh, sharpness, and everybody loves it. Some versions have DOF preview and self-timer.

135mm is compact light, perfect for portraits, bokeh to die for. 4 elements, tessar design. Requires the front to be racked very forward so better used with the C330 which has a shutter release on the body, not only on the front satandard.

180mm "old" exists at least in two mechanical versions:
- chrome, one that does not allow for bodies with auto-cocking which means it will work only on the C2, C3 and C220 cameras. You'll identify it by comparison to the
- chrome version that allows auto-cocking
180mm "old" is very sharp (at least at f11!) and has bokeh to die for
- black version

180mm "super" is always marked SUPER, has 5 elements, is perhaps the sharpest lens in all the lineup, has good bokeh, is smaller than the "old" lens, and many people love it but pay a premium for it.

250mm is big, only f6.3 speed but reviews on the net say it has good performance.

35mm field of view equivalents based on my "feel" of the lens and if you do square format:
55mm --> 28mm
65mm --> 35mm
80mm --> 45mm
105mm --> 58mm
135mm --> 75mm
180mm --> 100mm

equivalent if you crop to 6x4.5 rectangular format, based on a formula:
55mm --> 30mm
65mm --> 42mm
80mm --> 50mm
105mm --> 65mm
135mm --> 85mm
180mm --> 112mm
250mm --> 156mm

What to buy?

Architecture: 55mm
General purpose, press and street photo: 65mm
General purpose "i only have one lens": 80mm
General purpose, portrait-biased: 105mm
Portraits: 135mm
Portraits, full body: 180mm

Accesories:
- Side grip is very useful
- Porroprism is very dark and I can only focus reliably with it using the 135 or 180
- CdS porroprism, the same, but the CdS spot meter on it is VERY good, reliable, sensitive, precise, easy to use.
- Paramender only if you mind doing macro shoot.s
- Custom hoods good for the 55 and 65

Filter sizes are 40.5, 46mm or 49mm depending on the lens. PRO TIP: On lenses with 49mm thread the lenses have a "chrome" protecting/placeholder ring that needs to be removed to fit the filter otherwise you would think the filter size is a special custom size...
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Old 07-31-2016   #28
Jake Mongey
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From experience with the c33 get the body, mamiya (non metered) prism and 135 and 55mm lenses which cover all grounds (my 80mm 2.8 was broken and these two lenses have covered all bases)

Honestly you cant do no wrong with the mamiya tlr system
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Old 07-31-2016   #29
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Impressive and very informative post by flavio81. Thank you!

I would add to the information about the "D" and "DS" versions of the 105mm lens:

"D" is for diaphragm. The viewing lens has a DOF scale* and a diaphragm**.
* After focusing the lens, you set the focusing distance on a scale on the viewing lens to use the DOF scale.
** Set the aperture you are using onto the diaphragm in the viewing lens for "stopdown" checking/viewing of DOF.

"DS" is for diaphragm and self-timer. The viewing lens has the DOF scale and the diaphragm from the "D" lens. It also has a self-timer and is the only lens in the Mamiya TLR line-up to have this feature.


Jake, it looks like you just had a birthday. Congratulations on turning 16!

- Murray
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Old 08-01-2016   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMur12 View Post
Impressive and very informative post by flavio81. Thank you!

I would add to the information about the "D" and "DS" versions of the 105mm lens:

"D" is for diaphragm. The viewing lens has a DOF scale* and a diaphragm**.
* After focusing the lens, you set the focusing distance on a scale on the viewing lens to use the DOF scale.
** Set the aperture you are using onto the diaphragm in the viewing lens for "stopdown" checking/viewing of DOF.

"DS" is for diaphragm and self-timer. The viewing lens has the DOF scale and the diaphragm from the "D" lens. It also has a self-timer and is the only lens in the Mamiya TLR line-up to have this feature.


Jake, it looks like you just had a birthday. Congratulations on turning 16!

- Murray
Thanks Murray, i always wanted to know what were meanings and difference between "D" and "DS". What about the 80/2.8 "S" lens, does it has a self timer? Or "S" means it was an improved design -- multicoated?

Note that both the 105 D and 105DS have the new "Heliar" design while the plain 105, even if Black, has the old Tessar design.
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Old 08-01-2016   #31
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Hi flavio81 -

I don't know about the S on the 80mm 2.8. If it just denotes multi-coating on that particular lens, maybe it is more along the lines of "Super," but not quite super enough to spell it out.

- Murray
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Old 08-01-2016   #32
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Mine gave rather dull pics, any of the five lenses 55 to 180. Even had the proper lens shades for all. 180 is like two boxes stuck together.

As warned above, it was really heavy.

There was a Japanese TLR that gave similar pics.

Had no such trouble with a Rollei 2.8 TLR.
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Old 08-02-2016   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KoNickon View Post
I got (for dirt cheap) a C330 with chrome 80, and the prism finder. It's true that the prism finder throws the balance off, but it's useful. However, if you use it, I find that I really need the side hand grip; otherwise, it's just awkward to use.

I have the metered finder also, and while it's a little dim, it works pretty darn well. Like so much of the design of this system, it's simple but effective.

I tend to not like to use tripods (I know; a compromise on my part), so I have never used the paramender. But more than once I have found that I've cut off the top of images when focusing closely -- easy to do this, even though the C330 has a green bar that comes down from the top of the frame to supposedly show you the parallax correction. You need to overcompensate in the framing, I find.

No one has talked yet about the difference in the newer (black finish) and older (chrome finish) lenses. The older lenses are fully compatible with the newer bodies, with maybe an exception (the longer lenses maybe?). But if you find one of these in good shape, don't hesitate -- I have heard it said, and I think my experience corroborates, that they can be actually sharper than the black finish lenses. Just be aware that parts are not available for the chrome finish lenses.

I don't know the difference between the older 180 and the 180 Super, but I have a couple of the older 180s (one of them with some serious haze that cannot be removed) and they are fine lenses. I can't see an obvious improvement in the Super.
Thanks for the tip, and that's yet another conflicting bit of info about the finders. I think I'll just have to try one and see. I will take a dimmer image if it gives me metering, because metering is darn indispensable if you're in a hurry.

I'll also be careful about the parallax correction, and I don't see the 330 as much of a tripod camera for me, but I may want to use the Paramender/Tripod for macro work. The C330 will focus way closer than my 6x7 with any of the lenses I have for that.

My 180 is the Super version. It seems very nice. $109 off the Bay including shipping and it's flawless.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flavio81 View Post
Super has 5 elements instead of 4 for making it slightly shorter and lighter. I owned both versions, both are sharp lenses and I actually kept the older (4 element) version myself because I feel it has perfect bokeh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMur12 View Post
Thanks, flavio81 and KoNickon, for feedback about the 180 and the 180 Super lenses.



I have a 135mm chrome lens that cannot be used on my C330f. The shutter cocking lever is located such that it is in conflict with the camera's automatic shutter-cocking device and there is no way that the two of them can coexist in the same space. The lens works fine on the old Mamiyaflex that it came with and with my C220f, neither of which has automatic shutter cocking.

- Murray
My Chrome 80 works fine on my body, but I guess I'll be super dilligent about future lens purchases. Thanks!

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Originally Posted by farlymac View Post
Ah, Erik, the joy of a Mamiya C330. There's been many a time I've missed mine, but not enough to buy that kit again. Don't get me wrong, if it wasn't for the cost, I'd have another C330F right now. But I've gotten into other things since the those days, so I don't think it will ever happen again for me.

The times were great while they lasted though. Even twenty years ago when I was out shooting mine, people would be amazed I was using such an archaic piece of equipment. And that made it all the better for me. Add a Sunpak 611 potato smasher with the coiled cords and external battery pack, and you'll look like an old Press photographer. Oh, and you'll need a very large bag to carry it all in.

I've got a Paramender lying around here you can have. It's an earlier model, but should work well with the C330. I'll have to find it first, so I'll PM you for an address when I do.

PF
I understand the desire but not the need. If we ever get together I'll be happy to let you run a roll through mine. I get the archaic reaction when I shoot with *any* film camera so the TLR will be extra fun I don't have the Sunpak flash, but I do have the Pentax AF-400T potato-masher for the 6x7 and other cameras, and it will work just fine on the Mamiya. And again, I may need a big bag for all that, but I have them, and it'll still be lighter than the 6x7

Thanks very much for the kind offer of the Paramender. I'll hold off buying one and look forward to hearing that you have found it. Please let me at least pay for the shipping!

Quote:
Originally Posted by KenR View Post
While it is heavy, don't sell it short as it is quite portable. Look at photos of Diane Arbus in the early sixties and you'll see her with her big Mamiya and flash setup. I don't believe that she was a particularly big, muscular person.

That said, while I got some great results with it, I don't miss it as it was a beast to carry around.
It feels very portable. it's nowhere near as compact as the Yashica TLRs I have, but it's way, way smaller than any possible combination of 6x7 and accessories. I look forward to it for hiking and for street photography.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nokton48 View Post
Here's a nice read on the Mamiya C33 -- One of my favorites and a rapid-fire workhorse. If you want 220 buy the 220 Back which interchanges.

Diane Arbus is here too; nice photo of her with C33; I know I have owned and used the same and it is great stuff to use; photo by Gary Winogrand

The covering on this camera is grey rubber with thousands of little capital-letter "M"s Always thought that was too cool

This gear is bulky but not excessively heavy; I carried four of them at a time when photographing weddings.

https://greg-neville.com/2011/11/25/...cameras-no-11/
Four at a time? I won't even do that with 35mm cameras. I think I max out at 3. But that's good to know. I bet it's a superb wedding cam.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ray*j*gun View Post
I have a C220 and I will not add to the advice given on the lenses except to say that all the Seiko lenses I have for my M are all excellent. I will suggest the plain eye level prism for anyone who has the problem (as I do) of keeping hand held shots level. I find it invaluable and doesn't add that much bulk nor weight.
Another + for the prism, I'll have to try them. And Thanks for chiming in about lens quality; I find most Mamiya lenses are pretty excellent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flavio81 View Post
Ok, now that i'm sitting at my laptop let me give you a review of what you need to know about the Mamiya system so you don't need to go through the (excellent) Mamiya TLR FAQ out there on the web.

....

Filter sizes are 40.5, 46mm or 49mm depending on the lens. PRO TIP: On lenses with 49mm thread the lenses have a "chrome" protecting/placeholder ring that needs to be removed to fit the filter otherwise you would think the filter size is a special custom size...
Wow! I'll be reffering back to that often as I make my selections. Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake Mongey View Post
From experience with the c33 get the body, mamiya (non metered) prism and 135 and 55mm lenses which cover all grounds (my 80mm 2.8 was broken and these two lenses have covered all bases)

Honestly you cant do no wrong with the mamiya tlr system
That last part of that quote fills me with confidence. Thanks for your advice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CMur12 View Post
Impressive and very informative post by flavio81. Thank you!

I would add to the information about the "D" and "DS" versions of the 105mm lens:

"D" is for diaphragm. The viewing lens has a DOF scale* and a diaphragm**.
* After focusing the lens, you set the focusing distance on a scale on the viewing lens to use the DOF scale.
** Set the aperture you are using onto the diaphragm in the viewing lens for "stopdown" checking/viewing of DOF.

"DS" is for diaphragm and self-timer. The viewing lens has the DOF scale and the diaphragm from the "D" lens. It also has a self-timer and is the only lens in the Mamiya TLR line-up to have this feature.


Jake, it looks like you just had a birthday. Congratulations on turning 16!

- Murray
That's great to know if/when I go shopping for the 105. Thank you!

And happy birthday, Jake!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald M View Post
Mine gave rather dull pics, any of the five lenses 55 to 180. Even had the proper lens shades for all. 180 is like two boxes stuck together.

As warned above, it was really heavy.

There was a Japanese TLR that gave similar pics.

Had no such trouble with a Rollei 2.8 TLR.
I will be interested to see what my own pictures look like. The Yashica TLRs I shot with up till now gave me really nice shots. I hope the Mamiya can do the same.
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Old 08-02-2016   #34
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Thanks for your replies everyone! I think I have what I need to make good purchasing decisions in the future, but of course if you have something to add don't be shy.
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Old 08-02-2016   #35
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A bit more information about the finders:

The porrofinders (mirror finders) are dimmer and have lower magnification than the prism finder, so they are harder to focus. That said, the porrofinder with the spot meter is indeed useful. As you rack the bellows out, you need to add exposure to compensate for the extension. This is different with each focal length. With the meter finder, you don't have to worry about this; you just meter and it adjusts for the extension automatically.

- Murray
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Old 08-02-2016   #36
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Originally Posted by unixrevolution View Post
I understand the desire but not the need. If we ever get together I'll be happy to let you run a roll through mine. I get the archaic reaction when I shoot with *any* film camera so the TLR will be extra fun I don't have the Sunpak flash, but I do have the Pentax AF-400T potato-masher for the 6x7 and other cameras, and it will work just fine on the Mamiya. And again, I may need a big bag for all that, but I have them, and it'll still be lighter than the 6x7

Thanks very much for the kind offer of the Paramender. I'll hold off buying one and look forward to hearing that you have found it. Please let me at least pay for the shipping!
No need, it won't cost much since it's just going up the pike a ways.

And I'll have to take you up on that offer to use your C330. I'll even bring my own film!

PF
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Old 08-09-2016   #37
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No need, it won't cost much since it's just going up the pike a ways.

And I'll have to take you up on that offer to use your C330. I'll even bring my own film!

PF
If you insist, and thanks again! And that sounds like a great plan
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Old 08-09-2016   #38
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One last point, this stuff is cheap and plentiful.
Before you buy, try it and make sure it works for you.
If my case, I simply bought up the entire system. You can't go wrong.
Yes I prefer the older chrome lenses to the black ones. Results are exceptional as long as it's a good example. I shot weddings with chrome lenses.
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Old 08-10-2016   #39
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One last point, this stuff is cheap and plentiful.
Before you buy, try it and make sure it works for you.
If my case, I simply bought up the entire system. You can't go wrong.
Yes I prefer the older chrome lenses to the black ones. Results are exceptional as long as it's a good example. I shot weddings with chrome lenses.
I tried it with the 80mm lenses and loved it. With the 180s it's magical. I've definitely bonded with it.
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Old 08-15-2016   #40
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Recently I bought a Mamiya C330 kit, too.

I have a question concerning the parallax correction. When you focus closer, the needle goes down, and the needle represents the top edge of the frame, so you have to bring down, in your mind, both the right edge and the left edge to keep the image squared, is that correct? Is the lens a symetric design so the right edge travels as much as the left one?

I like the Rolleiflex approach: the reframing is done automatically like in an SLR ; but again it doesn't focus that close without filter.

How would the Paramender help with the frame size adjustment?

Thanks!
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