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Stupid question, pronounce "Rolleiflex"?
Old 02-28-2017   #1
dmr
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Stupid question, pronounce "Rolleiflex"?

Title says it all. How is this pronounced in (American) English?

Is it Row-Lee-Flex, Rawl-Lee-Flex, or something totally different?

TIA.
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Old 02-28-2017   #2
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Roll-a-flex. I think the idea is to get from "Roll" to "flex" with the shortest possible vowel sound. Roll-uh-flex. I think it is the sound that dictionaries represent with a backwards "e" character. Rolluhflex.
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Old 02-28-2017   #3
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From what I was told, in the German language with an “EI” vowel combination, the emphasis is on the last vowel, or “I.” Hence it is pronounced Roll-eye. This works for Leica too.

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Old 02-28-2017   #4
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We don't care how they say it in Germany or anywhere else, in Texas it is a Roll-a-flex.
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Old 02-28-2017   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmr View Post
Title says it all. How is this pronounced in (American) English?

Is it Row-Lee-Flex, Rawl-Lee-Flex, or something totally different?

TIA.
Auf Deutsch, it's three syllables:
  • First syllable: The leading R is rolled followed by a flat long "o" sound and the double LL sound.
  • Second syllable: ei as in "aye" or "sky"
  • Third syllable: a slightly harder x than English: "flecks"

"Rolleiflex" spoken

English pronunciation is typically "ROLL-ee-flex".

G
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Old 02-28-2017   #6
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In the States it's "Roll Uh Flex"
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Old 02-28-2017   #7
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Few folk (at least in the U.S.) know that Nikon is pronounced as "Nee-kon."
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Old 02-28-2017   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Auf Deutsch, it's three syllables:
  • First syllable: The leading R is rolled followed by a flat long "o" sound and the double LL sound.
  • Second syllable: ei as in "aye" or "sky"
  • Third syllable: a slightly harder x than English: "flecks"
"Rolleiflex" spoken
Exactly. That is the correct pronounciation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
English pronunciation is typically "ROLL-ee-flex".

G
And that is the wrong pronounciation .

Germans either smile or roll their eyes when they hear that .

Cheers, Jan
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Old 02-28-2017   #9
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. . . Germans either smile or roll their eyes when they hear that . . .
Dear Jan,

As in roll-eye-flex.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 02-28-2017   #10
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Originally Posted by HHPhoto View Post
...
Germans either smile or roll their eyes when they hear that .
...
You mean like my Mexican partner does whenever I attempt to speak Spanish...?

G
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Old 02-28-2017   #11
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Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
You mean like my Mexican partner does whenever I attempt to speak Spanish...?

G
Dear Godfrey,

I've discovered a wonderful way of getting actual Spanish Spaniards to try to interpret my appalling Spanish, though. I simply say,

Hay rencontro mi esposa in California y mi espanol es mexican

Yes, it's rotten Spanish but it gets them on my side.

Cheers,

R.
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Old 02-28-2017   #12
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Originally Posted by AZPhotog View Post
Few folk (at least in the U.S.) know that Nikon is pronounced as "Nee-kon."
Nippon Kogaku!
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Old 02-28-2017   #13
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Actually, the Amurrican way might be more like "Raleigh-flex."

And while we're at it, the German pronunciation of "Retina" is "Re-TEE-na" I believe. Not "RE-tuh-nuh," which is how the eye part is pronounced in English.
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Old 02-28-2017   #14
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Old 02-28-2017   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
From what I was told, in the German language with an “EI” vowel combination, the emphasis is on the last vowel, or “I.” Hence it is pronounced Roll-eye. This works for Leica too.

Jim B.
Absolutely correct. In Texas they probably pronounce Porsche as "Porch" instead of "Porsh-eh".
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Old 02-28-2017   #16
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In Canada we say Roll-eh-flex
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Old 02-28-2017   #17
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"EH?"

Exactly!

Cheers,

Rick, who just says "Roll-ee", and still has two of 'em.
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Old 02-28-2017   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
Dear Godfrey,

I've discovered a wonderful way of getting actual Spanish Spaniards to try to interpret my appalling Spanish, though. I simply say,

Hay rencontro mi esposa in California y mi espanol es mexican

Yes, it's rotten Spanish but it gets them on my side.

Cheers,

R.
Hmm. I tried. He corrected me, as usual :
"Encontré que mi esposa en California y mi español es mexicana."

Such it is living with a pedant.

G
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Texas
Old 02-28-2017   #19
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Exclamation Texas

Bike Tourist noted, "Absolutely correct. In Texas they probably pronounce Porsche as "Porch" instead of "Porsh-eh"."

Which reminded me of the story of a young lady knocking on the door of a Dallas home, inquiring if they needed any painting done.
The cheapskate owner said "I'll give you $25 DOLLARS IF YOU PAINT MY PORCH." The paint and brush are in the shed.

He just smiled when his wife berated him for being such a miser... "That's a big porch, Harold." ""Hey, I offered, she accepted," he said.

Later the girl knocked on the door, collected her fee, and told the owner, "I had paint left over after the Porch, so I painted your BMW, too."

(Take that, AG)

Rick B
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Last edited by newspaperguy : 02-28-2017 at 07:51. Reason: sp
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Old 02-28-2017   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZPhotog View Post
Few folk (at least in the U.S.) know that Nikon is pronounced as "Nee-kon."
:P It's easier when you know how the hiragana/katakana alphabet sounds. (But most Americans I know treat even Japanese names like they were French in trying to pronounce them combined).
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Old 02-28-2017   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmr View Post
Stupid question, pronounce "Rolleiflex"?
Great question!

However, after mispronouncing the Rolleiflex and Nikon brand names for decades, it will be very difficult for me to change.
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Old 02-28-2017   #22
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Roll-ee-flex for me
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Old 02-28-2017   #23
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Quote:
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Great question!

However, after mispronouncing the Rolleiflex and Nikon brand names for decades, it will be very difficult for me to change.
My American friend says Nigh-kon, instead of Nee-kon.
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Old 02-28-2017   #24
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I've always pronounced it Roll-ee-flex.
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Old 02-28-2017   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by narsuitus View Post
Great question!

However, after mispronouncing the Rolleiflex and Nikon brand names for decades, it will be very difficult for me to change.
The difficulty seems to be more in how others understand you. If I started pronouncing Nikon the way it's intended, I would likely have most people going "What?" 3 or 4 times before understanding what I meant.

It's like trying to say Gyro depending on your location.
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Old 02-28-2017   #26
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I pronounce it "Ro-lai-flex" I guess.

I am a Japanese but call Nikon "Naikon" maybe because I started using Nikon after I moved to the US. It just rolls better that way.
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Old 02-28-2017   #27
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The "ei" in Rollei is pronounced just the same as the "ei" in Leica.

You don't do yourself any favors pronouncing it differently ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sara View Post
Roll-ee-flex for me
... even worse if you seem proud of it, "Sayray".

Roland.
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Old 02-28-2017   #28
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and what about Fuji ??

In Ireland we say "Fu Jee"
but I was corrected often enough
to say it like "foo-hee" ?

I'd like to hear how it really sounds in Japanese
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Old 02-28-2017   #29
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and what about Fuji ??

In Ireland we say "Fu Jee"
but I was corrected often enough
to say it like "foo-hee" ?

I'd like to hear how it really sounds in Japanese
This one is easy. Short Fu ("Fu" in Futon or Tofu) and short Ji. ("Gi" in Gin or "Ji" in Kanji). Same as Mt Fuji (same kanji).
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Old 02-28-2017   #30
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Old 02-28-2017   #31
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I really wanna know the right German pronunciation of Voigtlander. That Japanese translation (that's how they actually spell it in Japanese) would sound something like "foktlender" but didn't think that sounded right.
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Old 02-28-2017   #32
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coelacanth, thanks and nice to know I am still learning.
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Old 02-28-2017   #33
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Originally Posted by coelacanth View Post
I really wanna know the right German pronunciation of Voigtlander. That Japanese translation (that's how they actually spell it in Japanese) would sound something like "foktlender" but didn't think that sounded right.
Spelled correctly: "Voigtländer".

That's actually pretty close. V is pronounced as English "F", the "oigt" resolves to a quick long "o" with the g being a glottal catch before a hard t sound, and the umlaut-a (ä) sound in this case (often spelled in English text as "ae") is almost exactly the same sound as the e in "end" and "lend". The final er is pronounced like "air" with the final r gently rolled but quick, on the exhale. It's three syllables ... first "voigt" as fo(g)t (the (g)t has a slight pause between the implied g and the t sounds), second "lend", third "air" where the inflection between lend and air is very short, they roll directly from one to the next.

I haven't thought about this stuff in years! It's kind of fun feeling the different parts of my mouth work the German pronunciation as different from the sloppy American "voyt-lander" ...

G
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Old 02-28-2017   #34
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Hmm. I tried. He corrected me, as usual :
"Encontré que mi esposa en California y mi español es mexicana."

Such it is living with a pedant.

G
Dear Godfrey,

Exactamente! But "mexican" instead of "mexicana" is a deliberate error on my part...

Cheers,

R.
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Old 02-28-2017   #35
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Don't the Japanese render it (spoken and written) as something like Vo-ta-ren-da?
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Old 02-28-2017   #36
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Don't the Japanese render it (spoken and written) as something like Vo-ta-ren-da?
They (at least try to) follow original sound/pronunciation of European language based names. (for English, often British English rather than American English) As Godfrey confirmed, sounds like they got the sound pretty OK for this instance. In other words, they might use "Voigtländer" in alphabets for marketing materials in prints, but they do also spell it in katakana フォクトレンダー and that is written and spoken like "foktlender."

For example, Japanese would pronounce Ikon ikon (Short i /ɪ/, not "ai") like many other countries/languages while we often call it Aikon in the US. Same goes for Ikea. They use spelling of Aluminium and pronounce similar to that in katakana (アルミニウム)while we use Aluminum in the US.
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Old 02-28-2017   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coelacanth View Post
They (at least try to) follow original sound/pronunciation of European language based names. (for English, often British English rather than American English) As Godfrey confirmed, sounds like they got the sound pretty OK for this instance. In other words, they might use "Voigtländer" in alphabets for marketing materials in prints, but they do also spell it in katakana フォクトレンダー and that is written and spoken like "foktlender."
Kind of like the closest thing to my name would be かる(Karu), my last name though... totally different story, unless I wanted to go with a literal translation, which wouldn't be appropriate in this context (i.e.: 祝福)

I don't know the alphabet quite that well, but there's only like 50-ish sounds to work with.
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Old 02-28-2017   #38
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Kind of like the closest thing to my name would be かる(Karu), my last name though... totally different story, unless I wanted to go with a literal translation, which wouldn't be appropriate in this context (i.e.: 祝福)

I don't know the alphabet quite that well, but there's only like 50-ish sounds to work with.
For fun, your name would be spelled カール・ブレッシング in Japanese. They don't "translate" foreign names by their meanings. They apply the sound to katakana. Oh and often, for whatever reason, they put "・" to connect first and last name. Also they don't flip the full name to Last name, first name order (standard in Japanese) for foreign names in everyday context.
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Old 02-28-2017   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coelacanth View Post
They (at least try to) follow original sound/pronunciation of European language based names. (for English, often British English rather than American English) As Godfrey confirmed, sounds like they got the sound pretty OK for this instance. In other words, they might use "Voigtländer" in alphabets for marketing materials in prints, but they do also spell it in katakana フォクトレンダー and that is written and spoken like "foktlender."

For example, Japanese would pronounce Ikon ikon (Short i /ɪ/, not "ai") like many other countries/languages while we often call it Aikon in the US. Same goes for Ikea. They use spelling of Aluminium and pronounce similar to that in katakana (アルミニウム)while we use Aluminum in the US.
Thanks, good stuff.
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Old 02-28-2017   #40
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How it's pronounced depends on where you live. Germans in Germany are going to pronounce it differently than Americans in America, and maybe the UK has their own way of saying it. It's the same w/ Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, etc.

Which is right? None are "right", it's just that some places have their own way of saying things. It's called regional pronunciation. When I lived in New Orleans (pronounced Nu Aw lins and not Nawlins) we would say"across the rivah" and "walkin in da French Qwatah" like someone from Brooklyn, Over across the river were the Yats, who would ask you "whea ya at?" if they met someone, and they talked like that because they WERE from Brooklyn, or at least their parents were, and that's how they talked in that micro area.

The local and correct way to pronounce the street named Chartres was just like it looks, "Char ters" . That one used to really infuriate people from France when I lived there, but that's just their natural state of existence. Permanently, low grade PO'd. A happy Frenchman is probably an Italian. A little off topic, but here's a neat video on the Yats of New Orleans, and yes, he pronounced New Orleans wrong.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-0...sibly-impacted
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