Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Coffee With Mentors > Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

Bill Pierce - Leica M photog and author

 

“Our autobiography is written in our contact sheets,  and our opinion of the world in our selects”  

"Never ever confuse sharp with good, or you will end up shaving with an ice cream cone and licking a razor blade."  

 

Bill Pierce is one of the most successful Leica photographers and authors ever. I initially "met" Bill in the wonderful 1973 15th edition Leica Manual (the one with the M5 on the cover). I kept reading and re-reading his four chapters, continually amazed at his knoweldge and ability, thinking "if I only knew a small part of what this guy knows... wow."  I looked foward to his monthly columns in Camera 35 and devoured them like a starving man.  Bill has worked as a photojournalist  for 25 years, keyword: WORK.  Many photogs dream of the professional photographer's  life that Bill has earned and enjoyed.  Probably Bill's most famous pic is Nixon departing the White House for the last time, victory signs still waving. 

 

Bill  has been published in many major magazines, including  Time, Life, Newsweek, U.S. News, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, New York Magazine, Stern, L'Express and Paris Match.  :His published books include  The Leica Manual,  War Torn, Survivors and Victims in the Late 20th Century, Homeless in America,  Human Rights in China,  Children of War.  Add to that numerous exhibitions at major galleries and museums.  Magazine contributions include  Popular Photography,  Camera 35, Leica Manual,  Photo District News, the Encyclopedia of Brittanica, the Digital Journalist, and now RFF.  Major awards include Leica Medal of Excellence, Overseas Press Club's Oliver Rebbot Award for Best Photojournalism from Abroad,  and the World Press Photo's Budapest Award. Perhaps an ever bigger award is Tom Abrahamsson's comment: "If you want to know Rodinal, ask Bill."

 

I met Bill in person through our mutual friend Tom Abrahamsson.  In person his insight and comments are every bit as interesting and engaging as his writing.  He is a great guy who really KNOWS photography.  I am happy to say he has generously agreed to host this forum at RFF  From time to time Bill will bring up topics, but you are also invited to ask questions.  Sit down and enjoy the ride!

 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

What....
Old 03-12-2018   #1
Bill Pierce
Registered User
 
Bill Pierce's Avatar
 
Bill Pierce is offline
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,161
What....

The one thing all photographers have in common is cameras. Essays, evaluations and test reports of new cameras abound on the internet. Lenses probably get the number two spot, as well they should. Cameras don’t work without them and, in many cases, a good lens will outlive the camera body it started on.

But what then? Camera bags? Tripods? Film or memory cards? Darkroom gear or processing programs? My guess is that different photographers want different information. I was a darkroom freak; so, now I’m a computer geek. When I first came to NYC, I survived as a lighting designer and electrician in the first “off Broadway” theaters. It left me with a love of lighting gear and head shots.

Outside of cameras and lenses, from your perspective what gear should we be talking about? Maybe there are a couple of things that dominate our “need to know” or maybe not.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #2
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 70
Posts: 4,621
Bill the internet is full of equipment discussions and opinions but there are very few real photographers that have the kind of portfolio you have. Rather than more gear discussion I'd love to see images you feel are your best with your account of what inspired the image and your thoughts that led to the way you executed the shoot. I'd love to know your feelings about subject, what you felt would be the best lighting and how you interacted with your subject. What's the story behind the photo?

In addition I'd love to see a scan of your raw neg with no dodging and burning and then the final print with comments on why you dodged, burned and bleached the image as you did. Your selection of paper, toner and such all play a part in how you visualized the final image.

Please consider doing this.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #3
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,889
To me, the most important accessory is a good handheld meter.

It amazes me to see so many people who will spend $500 for a camera bag but will skimp on a meter, buying the cheapest thing they can find. I use a Sekonic L-758DR, which was Sekonic's top of the line until recently when it was replaced by a newer model. It was a $600 meter, plus the $130 it cost for the calibration and profiling target that lets you profile a camera for exposure accuracy.

That's a lot of money, but it was worth every dollar. A properly exposed image, whether shot on film or digital, is so much easier to edit and print. A good meter is a time saver that improves the quality of your work far more than any high-end bag or fancy strap or whatever.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #4
michaelwj
----------------
 
michaelwj's Avatar
 
michaelwj is offline
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brisbane AUS
Posts: 2,098
I think the most difficult decision to make is tripods. I hate buying a new tripod. There are so many models from so many brands at so many price points. Unlike cameras and lenses, the barrier for entry for a manufacturer is low (they aren't that complicated). Unlike bags, the quality of the tripod will influence the results (in many respects, if it carries your gear, the bag is okay). Unlike film, darkrooms, post processing, printing, a tripod doesn't really influence the art - it should be an objective decision. A tripod will in many cases outlive both cameras and lenses, but it's so hard to find objective reviews. All the manufacturers give their own limits which can't be directly compared, and everyone has an opinion - usually the model they use; it's not like people go through that many tripods do they?

I suppose lighting would also fall into the same category (apart from flashes which may be brand specific), but I'm not a big lighting user...
__________________
Cheers,
Michael
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #5
michaelwj
----------------
 
michaelwj's Avatar
 
michaelwj is offline
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brisbane AUS
Posts: 2,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Bill the internet is full of equipment discussions and opinions but there are very few real photographers that have the kind of portfolio you have. Rather than more gear discussion I'd love to see images you feel are your best with your account of what inspired the image and your thoughts that led to the way you executed the shoot. I'd love to know your feelings about subject, what you felt would be the best lighting and how you interacted with your subject. What's the story behind the photo?

In addition I'd love to see a scan of your raw neg with no dodging and burning and then the final print with comments on why you dodged, burned and bleached the image as you did. Your selection of paper, toner and such all play a part in how you visualized the final image.

Please consider doing this.
When I was the librarian at our local camera club, the most checked out book was "50 Portraits" by Gregory Heisler, which is exactly this. An excellent book. There is definitely a desire for this type of image creation discussion.
__________________
Cheers,
Michael
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #6
Ko.Fe.
Kostya Fedot
 
Ko.Fe.'s Avatar
 
Ko.Fe. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: MiltON.ONtario
Posts: 7,103
My most participated after cameras and lenses thread is - do I need UV filter on my digital camera? And then - will airport x-ray damage my film?
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #7
retinax
Registered User
 
retinax is offline
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 825
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Bill the internet is full of equipment discussions and opinions but there are very few real photographers that have the kind of portfolio you have. Rather than more gear discussion I'd love to see images you feel are your best with your account of what inspired the image and your thoughts that led to the way you executed the shoot. I'd love to know your feelings about subject, what you felt would be the best lighting and how you interacted with your subject. What's the story behind the photo?

In addition I'd love to see a scan of your raw neg with no dodging and burning and then the final print with comments on why you dodged, burned and bleached the image as you did. Your selection of paper, toner and such all play a part in how you visualized the final image.

Please consider doing this.
Yes, this would be wonderful!
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #8
x-ray
Registered User
 
x-ray's Avatar
 
x-ray is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Age: 70
Posts: 4,621
Not trying to hijack Bills thread but we have one of the great photographers of our time right here on this forum and all people want to do is talk gear. Unbelievable! Tap this mans mind and experience. Learn! Get inspired!
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #9
back alley
IMAGES
 
back alley's Avatar
 
back alley is offline
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: true north strong & free
Posts: 49,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Bill the internet is full of equipment discussions and opinions but there are very few real photographers that have the kind of portfolio you have. Rather than more gear discussion I'd love to see images you feel are your best with your account of what inspired the image and your thoughts that led to the way you executed the shoot. I'd love to know your feelings about subject, what you felt would be the best lighting and how you interacted with your subject. What's the story behind the photo?

In addition I'd love to see a scan of your raw neg with no dodging and burning and then the final print with comments on why you dodged, burned and bleached the image as you did. Your selection of paper, toner and such all play a part in how you visualized the final image.

Please consider doing this.
i'd love this as well.
a respected voice of experience sharing his 'image thoughts' would be spectacular.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #10
zuiko85
Registered User
 
zuiko85 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 1,861
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
To me, the most important accessory is a good handheld meter.

It amazes me to see so many people who will spend $500 for a camera bag but will skimp on a meter, buying the cheapest thing they can find. I use a Sekonic L-758DR, which was Sekonic's top of the line until recently when it was replaced by a newer model. It was a $600 meter, plus the $130 it cost for the calibration and profiling target that lets you profile a camera for exposure accuracy.

That's a lot of money, but it was worth every dollar. A properly exposed image, whether shot on film or digital, is so much easier to edit and print. A good meter is a time saver that improves the quality of your work far more than any high-end bag or fancy strap or whatever.
Oh rats! I’ve been using my $9 used Gossen Pilot and ‘Kentucky windage’
to determine exposure for my old film cameras. That and bracketing if I’m not sure. (Your too far north in Indiana to use Kentucky windage Chris, but I grew up just across the river in southern Indiana ’ kentuckyana’ they say locally, so it’s okay for me.)
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #11
BillBingham2
Registered User
 
BillBingham2's Avatar
 
BillBingham2 is offline
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ames, Iowa, USA
Posts: 5,874
Me, I'm a lighting freak, I love off camera flash, but I have to agree with the perhaps looking at setting up some sort of portfolio library that people could load into a central part of RFF so that we can all look, comment, and learn.

I look at this as an expansion of what we have already, not sure how to implement it. Perhaps section of the gallery or a different gallery. I think the segmentation/separation is critical for ease of use.

B2 (;->
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #12
Franko
Registered User
 
Franko is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 42
Another vote for how and why from Bill.

Modern gear comes, goes and is forgotten with astonishing speed but great photographs can live forever.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #13
farlymac
PF McFarland
 
farlymac's Avatar
 
farlymac is offline
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 6,147
When it comes to gear talk, Bill, for me it's "When is a full kit too much?". Is it when you have half a dozen platforms to support, or when you haul it all out on a shoot, and use three items?

As for non-gear talk, I'd like to know what it was like to work for W. Eugene Smith.

PF
__________________
Waiting for the light
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #14
shimokita
白黒
 
shimokita's Avatar
 
shimokita is offline
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Japan, Tokyo
Posts: 746
In my experience the number 3 gear issue is lighting, followed by repairs / maintenance. Non-gear issues for non-professionals seem to be post processing and motivation.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-12-2018   #15
Rayt
Registered User
 
Rayt's Avatar
 
Rayt is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,836
I travel with at least one light meter a Sekonic 308 and of course the phone meter app. For large format I also bring the Pentax spotmeter. Last week I left my Sekonic at home. 12 frames into the roll I realize I set the camera to iso400 film when I was shooting Silvermax. I remember when I was young and extremely poor and had to scrape together money for film I had to train my eyes to read the light and guess exposure. At the time I could guess aperture/shutter speed setting within a stop. Last week it took me 12 frames to realize the light was too low to be shooting at f8 and 1/60. Use it or lose it!
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #16
RichC
Registered User
 
RichC is offline
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Brighton, UK
Posts: 1,321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
The one thing all photographers have in common is cameras ... Outside of cameras and lenses, from your perspective what gear should we be talking about?
We shouldn’t be talking about more gear! Once we’ve got the important stuff, we should just use it!

What follows getting a camera isn’t more gear but learning - mechanical skills, such as camera control and darkroom/computer development, and “soft” skills, such as visual communication (pictorial composition, graphic design, colour theory, etc.) and learning about visual culture (art history, etc.). And what and how you want to photograph.

The first category is self-evident. You need to know how to use your tools.

The second: well, no picture created by us exists in a vacuum. However random a photograph may seem, there will have been some human agency in its creation. And our culture has a massive influence on how we take photographs: Western, Indian and Japanese photography each have very different and distinctive hallmarks, for example (e.g. Indian studio photographs often have the flattened perspective characteristic of Mughal painting - unlike Western photographic portraits whose ancestral DNA is European Renaissance art). British photography is different from American photography. And that’s before we add ourselves to the mix.

Some photographers are uninterested in all this “baggage” that unconsciously and consciously goes into every photograph they take, but if they learn - and talk - about it, they will make better pictures.

In my case, I bought my first decent camera about 15 years ago, and decided to learn to use it properly. I first enrolled on an evening course, which taught me the basics, after which I joined the local camera club. The club was brilliant - I was around a bunch of folk with similar interests, and I learnt a lot about what makes photographs tick and how to take them. Crucially, looking at, studying and talking about photographs, I slowly became aware of what I wanted from a photograph - which led to me leaving the club. Why did I leave? Camera clubs tend towards traditional “pictorial” photography, but I became drawn to contemporary and conceptual photography. After leaving the club I went on to do a master’s degree in art photography (the university accepted me despite my only art qualifications being gold stars from the camera club!).

So, what should come after getting a camera is learning, not more gear!
__________________

-=Rich=-


Portfolio: www.richcutler.co.uk
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #17
Contarama
Registered User
 
Contarama is offline
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 1,234
When toys become tools. It was not easy for me.
__________________
Art is the ability to make something...even if it is a big mess...
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #18
JoeLopez
Registered User
 
JoeLopez's Avatar
 
JoeLopez is offline
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Detroit, Michigan
Posts: 357
I much prefer to read about how to use the tools (camera, lens, etc) to create better images. Good point about light meters, but more about how they are used efficiently.
__________________
Minolta A5 - acquired September 2018

Other gear: Minolta X-570, Nikon F3/T, N90 & D7100, Fuji X100T
Nikkor 50mm f1.8, 28mm f2.8 E, Voigtlander 40mm f/2.0 Ultron SL, Minolta 45mm f2 & 50mm f1.7

My Flickr | My ebay | Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #19
karateisland
Registered User
 
karateisland's Avatar
 
karateisland is offline
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeLopez View Post
I much prefer to read about how to use the tools (camera, lens, etc) to create better images. Good point about light meters, but more about how they are used efficiently.
I second this.

I recently got some of this when I shot a roll of Portra in my Rolleiflex, and ran into quite a few complications using an incident meter. I started a thread to ask about developing, and ahe responders offered a lot of advice about proper metering--advice from experience that I couldn't have found elsewhere on the net. The more discussion like that, the better.

(That being said, I'm also on board for more discussion of images from the greats.)
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #20
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santiago, Chile
Age: 45
Posts: 19,736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscrawfordphoto View Post
To me, the most important accessory is a good handheld meter.

It amazes me to see so many people who will spend $500 for a camera bag but will skimp on a meter, buying the cheapest thing they can find.
I don't know. You have to work a certain type of way for a handheld meter to be useful right? Slow and methodical.

Many built in meters are good enough once you learn how they react. If you work quickly in changing light, the only choice you have is the built in meter or guessing.

In modern digital, I feel that I can expose for the highlights and bring up the shadows in post most of the time. Is it the perfect exposure? Maybe not. Does it get the job done and allow me to get fleeting moments? Yes.

There are many ways to do the same thing and we don't all photograph the same things the same way.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #21
Bill Pierce
Registered User
 
Bill Pierce's Avatar
 
Bill Pierce is offline
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,161
A question for the experts... How do you post a jpg here? Until now I've been text only.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #22
Chriscrawfordphoto
Real Men Shoot Film.
 
Chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
 
Chriscrawfordphoto is offline
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Age: 43
Posts: 8,889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
A question for the experts... How do you post a jpg here? Until now I've been text only.

Bill,

I have a post on how to do that:

https://www.rangefinderforum.com/for...d.php?t=163732
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #23
fireblade
Vincenzo.
 
fireblade's Avatar
 
fireblade is offline
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,139
Having my cameras and lenses that i need, i'm looking at setting up a decent printer and scanner system.
__________________
Vincenzo

"No place is boring, if you've had a good night's sleep and have a pocket full of unexposed film."
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2018   #24
Doug
Moderator
 
Doug's Avatar
 
Doug is online now
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Pacific NW, USA
Posts: 12,930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Pierce View Post
A question for the experts... How do you post a jpg here? Until now I've been text only.
Hi Bill -- There is a Help subforum in RFF containing a thread named "How to post pictures in threads", here:
https://www.rangefinderforum.com/for...d.php?t=117509

Doug
__________________
Doug’s Gallery
RFF on Facebook
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-14-2018   #25
Kevcaster
Registered User
 
Kevcaster is offline
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: London
Posts: 225
After film, camera and lens I need a sense of purpose
__________________
Leica M6 1989 - Leica M3 1955 - no more broken cameras - Zeiss Contarex Cyclops 1967 - no digital - Nikon F F2 F2A - only analogue - Horizon 202 - Hasselblad X-Pan - only silver media - Rolleiflex 2.8F - All now working as they should
Flickr
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-14-2018   #26
Bill Pierce
Registered User
 
Bill Pierce's Avatar
 
Bill Pierce is offline
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 1,161
Just a quick attempt to learn to post pictures...
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #27
Yokosuka_Mike
The Beat Goes On
 
Yokosuka_Mike's Avatar
 
Yokosuka_Mike is offline
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Yokosuka, Japan
Age: 64
Posts: 1,864
What would a guy who has everything need… how about a UV filter.

I wanted a 52mm UV filter, and before we go any further/farther whatever, I should preface this post with the fact that I prefer to buy my stuff in a store not online. Silly, yes, but that’s me. Anyway I wanted a UV filter so I went to Yodobashi Camera store in Kamiooka and was quite surprised by how much the filter section had shrunk. A mere ghost of what it used to be. And, then I was faced with the fact that UV filters are apparently a thing of the past. There were only a few UVs hiding in a bargain bin beneath the big modern rack of lens protectors. Let me repeat, “Lens Protectors”!

Holy guacamole! There are more brands and styles of lens protectors than one can shake a roll of film at. The price range boggles the mind. There were lens protectors billed as water, oil and grease proof, there were lens protectors advertised as “solid” whatever that means. My goodness there were lens protectors worth more [priced more] than some of my previously owned lenses. What the hell! I guess I haven't needed a filter for a while; like about 50 years it looks like.

So, I thought, no problem, I’ll go to the Yodobashi camera store in Yokohama - it was worse. They used to have a huge filter section. Not now. It sucks. They have less than half the previous floor space covered with filter racks and 70% of it is for lens protectors. Very expensive lens protectors!

Out of frustration I walked a few city blocks to Yokohama BIC camera, another chain store similar to Yodobashi but with a better stocked dusty bargain bin under the big modern display of lens protectors... and, I managed to snag the 52mm UV filter, a Marumi brand classic “cheap” UV filter. I was so thrilled to get what I wanted that I decided to celebrate, I had a scotch and water in the middle of the afternoon, followed by another.

Well, this is where the story ends. I got my UV filter, I had my little celebration (any excuse will do) and I learned a valuable lesson. What is that lesson? The lesson is that when one gets old/older, the things one took for granted are just not there anymore. Might not be long before people talk about M-mount lenses in terms of the Ford model T. Remember when…

Mike

P.s. Any grammar errors are the fault of the scotch and water, not me.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #28
Peter Wijninga
Registered User
 
Peter Wijninga's Avatar
 
Peter Wijninga is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,972
I am looking forward to the photos.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #29
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 5,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelwj View Post
I think the most difficult decision to make is tripods. I hate buying a new tripod. There are so many models from so many brands at so many price points. Unlike cameras and lenses, the barrier for entry for a manufacturer is low (they aren't that complicated). Unlike bags, the quality of the tripod will influence the results (in many respects, if it carries your gear, the bag is okay). Unlike film, darkrooms, post processing, printing, a tripod doesn't really influence the art - it should be an objective decision. A tripod will in many cases outlive both cameras and lenses, but it's so hard to find objective reviews. All the manufacturers give their own limits which can't be directly compared, and everyone has an opinion - usually the model they use; it's not like people go through that many tripods do they?

I suppose lighting would also fall into the same category (apart from flashes which may be brand specific), but I'm not a big lighting user...
I agree with this. Tripod buying is difficult. And so much misinformation. I finally bought the lightest Gitzo Traveller tripod the 1545T, mainly as it packs so short and I couldn't get lighter if I found the model up was too heavy after all, on the shoulder over several kilometres. It is not. And it is nice and rigid without the centre column up and may be with that, but I have hardly tried. And while so many online maintain it'll be no good for a Hasselblad, with the column down and the last section still telescoped it's solid as a rock. If I'd bought the 2545T and found it too heavy I was looking at doubling my outlay.

But apart from the traditional immutable compromise of height and weight and rigidity, to maximise the compactness of the Gitzo kit this model comes with a ballhead with no friction adjustment setting dial. Never mind.
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #30
Richard G
Registered User
 
Richard G's Avatar
 
Richard G is offline
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 37,47 S
Posts: 5,074
Quote:
Originally Posted by x-ray View Post
Bill the internet is full of equipment discussions and opinions but there are very few real photographers that have the kind of portfolio you have. Rather than more gear discussion I'd love to see images you feel are your best with your account of what inspired the image and your thoughts that led to the way you executed the shoot. I'd love to know your feelings about subject, what you felt would be the best lighting and how you interacted with your subject. What's the story behind the photo?

In addition I'd love to see a scan of your raw neg with no dodging and burning and then the final print with comments on why you dodged, burned and bleached the image as you did. Your selection of paper, toner and such all play a part in how you visualized the final image.

Please consider doing this.
I occasionally re-read Bill's Chapter in the mid-'70s Leica Manual on low light photography. Some of it has stuck in my mind for over 40 years since I first read it:

1. The legendary shooter who can hand-hold 1/2s has his talent confirmed by all the praise he gets for his shots.

2. The Leitz tabletop tripod might be better than most bigger tripods. (Think that was in that chapter....)

3. There is a peak or a pause in the action of an orator where a 1/2s exposure will be unspoilt by subject movement and you have to learn to anticipate that.

So yes: more from Bill, live, in the new century....
__________________
Richard
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #31
Rob-F
Likes Leicas
 
Rob-F's Avatar
 
Rob-F is offline
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: The Show Me state
Age: 78
Posts: 5,889
I agree with Chris on the importance of good light measurement. I do trust my built-in meters in my Leica and Nikons, but I get the best exposures shooting with a handheld meter. For this reason, my exposures can sometimes be better with the Hasselblad than with the 335mm cameras with built-in meters. When using handhelds, I almost always take an incident reading and cross-check with a reflected reading. More than a slight difference needs to be understood before taking the exposure. I use (not all on the same day) one of my Norwood Directors (incident); my Spectra 251 (incident); Minolta incident meter; Gossen (incident and reflected) and Weston Master IV. The Gossen is handy because it can take both an incident and reflected reading, so only one meter is needed. I'm on the lookout for a Spectra Combi-2, that also has this incident plus reflected capability. Hope they are not too pricey!

An awareness of about what the light reading should be is helpful. It helps to avoid bad exposures owing to a faulty meter reading!
__________________
May the light be with you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #32
Contarama
Registered User
 
Contarama is offline
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Tulsa
Posts: 1,234
Systems as has been the case for a long time my opinion. Which now include CPUs monitors software cloud storage device storage etc

Bags and tripods are still important. Handheld meters most definitely
__________________
Art is the ability to make something...even if it is a big mess...
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-04-2018   #33
Jamie Pillers
Skeptic
 
Jamie Pillers's Avatar
 
Jamie Pillers is offline
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Oakland, California
Posts: 4,013
As soon as I get the camera/lens together, all I can think about is subject matter.
__________________
Talk to a stranger today!

Fuji X-H1; X-Pro1; XF10; Polaroid 250 (waiting for an 'art' project)

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-05-2018   #34
Yokosuka_Mike
The Beat Goes On
 
Yokosuka_Mike's Avatar
 
Yokosuka_Mike is offline
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Yokosuka, Japan
Age: 64
Posts: 1,864
As an add on to my "What would a guy who has everything need… how about a UV filter", today I found and purchased a NOS Kenko brand 27mm UV filter. It was the last one, I don't think they make them anymore.

I'm happy,
Mike
  Reply With Quote

Old 10-05-2018   #35
jsrockit
Moderator
 
jsrockit's Avatar
 
jsrockit is offline
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Santiago, Chile
Age: 45
Posts: 19,736
For me, the only other thing I need, besides a camera and lens, is a comfortable neck strap... and it needs to be exactly 44cm long... haha.
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 23:29.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.