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CSC : Digital Compact System Cameras - This new category of digital Compact System Cameras with interchangeable lenses was mislabeled for a time as "Mirrorless Cameras" by those forgetting about "Mirrorless" Rangefinder cameras.  Such confusion is easily understandable, since interchangeable rangefinder cameras were only recently introduced in 1932.  hmm.    CSC or Compact System Camera is probably the best category description to date, although I am fond of the old RFF desigation of  CEVIL  indicating Compact Electronic Viewfidner Interchangeable Lens.   This forum is here at RFF because via adapters these cameras offer an inexpensive way to use rangefinder lenses on digital cameras -- in addition of just about every 35mm SLR lens you can think of.  All  offer the photo enthusiast an incredible array of adopted lenses which was not possible before these new digital formats.   This group continues to grow in popularity and new camera models! 

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Old 02-16-2019   #81
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The results look good to me. On the back of the camera, the nice low viewfinder eyepiece height reminds me of an OM-1, particularly when the rear screen is folded away.
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/21...ing-experience
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Old 02-16-2019   #82
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Originally Posted by lynnb View Post
Hi Huss,

I think this is the reason for the EM1X: hand-holdable super telephoto, for the Olympics. To me it looks like Olympus is hoping that Olympics photographers with the EM1X will be able to get photos that others can't, with up to 2,000mm (? - see linked article) equivalent handheld.

The market for such a camera must be very small, even including BIF enthusiasts.

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Lynn
While I have no interest in these new cameras, I can see the specialized utility in the Olympus. I have an original model EM-1 mainly so I can use an adapted Olympus 50-200 2.8-3.5 tele-zoom, sometimes with a 1.4X extender. The combination is pretty sharp, lightweight with a fast aperture and decent enough for my purposes AF. I seldom shoot with long lenses but when combined with Olympus IBIS, the outfit is pretty agile and hand-holdable.
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Old 02-16-2019   #83
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
Fuji X-Pro2 + 23/2 = $1,949
Canon EOS RP + RF 35/1.8 = $1,748

Which of the 35mm focal length choices would you pick? APS-C vs FF ... optical viewfinder vs EVF?
If I was starting from scratch looking for a digital mirrorless platform in this price range, the EOS RP could be my choice. The EOS RP's size and weight works for me. The EF adapter is compact and provides access to a sea of lenses. I much prefer the EOS RP to the Nikon Z6 and 7 (due to weight and my opinion of newer Nikon lenses, not cost).

After using FUJIFILM's EVF/OVF, an OVF is a non-negotiable, must have feature. If I was moving from a DSLR to digital mirrorless, I wonder if I would understand how the OVF means I can use the camera as I once used my Zeiss Ikon ZM? That said, the EOS RP's articulated LCD screen would be very convenient when the camera is on a tripod. Which reminds me, neither camera has internal image stabilization.

The EOS R is not ISO-invariant (ISO gain is required to optimize shadow-region IQ). This is not an inherent disadvantage, but sometimes it's simpler to ignore ISO and just concentrate on the optimum shutter time and aperture. And for in-camera JPEGs ISO-invariance is irrelevant. The EOS RP's sensor is assumed to be similar to the EOS 6D II. This sensor's sensitivity is similar to the X-Pro 2's.

After using cameras with 24 X 36 mm and APS-C sensors, I don't consider either to be inherently superior. I think the most important factor is what lenses does one already own. Another involves the type of work one intends to do. That said, nothing beats sensor area in terms of maximizing total signal level. This can make a difference. Increasing lens surface area is a separate way to maximize the total signal level. But then the lenses become larger, heavier and more expensive.

For my needs a F 2 prime gets the job done. At shorter focal lengths I'm OK with F 2.8.

If sensor area was important for my work I would skip 24 X 36 mm sensors and jump to the medium-format mirrorless sensor area.
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Old 02-16-2019   #84
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Originally Posted by mcfingon View Post
The results look good to me. On the back of the camera, the nice low viewfinder eyepiece height reminds me of an OM-1, particularly when the rear screen is folded away.
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/21...ing-experience
John Mc
Results do look good, looks like another winner from Canon.
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Old 02-16-2019   #85
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If those are results which looks good, then I really miss something. Here is no even single shot on high iso and portraits are mushy where focus is.
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Old 02-16-2019   #86
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If those are results which looks good, then I really miss something. Here is no even single shot on high iso and portraits are mushy where focus is.
You can't tell anything from internet photos. Those shots could have been made by any camera.
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Old 02-16-2019   #87
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Today I had a chance to hold a number of mirrorless cameras side-by-side and play with them for an hour or so: Canon EOS-RP, Canon EOS-R, Nikon Z7, Nikon Z6, Fuji X-Pro2, X100F, and a number of Fuji X-T models (plus many Sony/Olympus/Panasonic/etc I don't care much about). Here are my observations:

The Canon EOS bodies had by far the best build quality and they felt very solid and ergonomic in my hand. The top-panel LCD on the EOS-R is a nice feature and looks beautiful. The Canon EOS-RP body is a bit short, though, and I see the need for the available extension grip. The EVF was the best in terms of size, response (refresh rate and flicker), contrast & brightness, and the eye relieve was much larger than any of the other cameras. However, even though customers only had a few hours to play with these cameras, the plastic lens barrel was already broken and had a wide crack with sharp plastic peeling off! How come my Leica and Nikon AI-S lenses are decades old and work like new, and this lens didn't survive a few hours inside a store?!? The lens had trouble locking focus, but maybe this was because the lens barrel had a crack. Plus, the lens looked HUGE for the small bodies. What I hated is that the ON/OFF wheel is on the left of the bodies, so you need both hands to turn the camera on! What was Canon thinking?!

The Nikon Zs felt very solid, too, but the design and arrangements of the buttons didn't seem very natural and the bodies didn't feel as ergonomic in my hands as the Canon bodies.

The Fujis were surprisingly small, especially the X-T models. In fact, too small for my hands to feel comfortable. To my surprise, the optical viewfinder of the X-Pro2, X100F did nothing for me because they lacked frame lines, so I had no clue what I was framing and what would end up on the photos, and there was no other info in the optical viewfinder such as exposure time, f/stop, etc. Plus, I had no clue what the lens focused on until I looked at the photos on the display at the back. I thought to myself "Why am I even looking through this OVF if its adding zero information?" I thought maybe it was operator error and I need to add some electronic info somewhere in the menus? I gave up going through the menu after 10 minutes because I didn't find anything. Very odd. When I switched to the EVF, I found it rather small, the resolution was not very high, the contrast low and not bright enough. Plus, when flipping from OVF to EVF, they didn't match and the images jumped. Very disappointing. The zoom lenses that were mounted on the X-T had a huge lag when I zoomed in & out which felt very unnatural, and the zoom speed was not linear, it accelerated while zooming. Very weird! But I loved the small sizes of the lenses, which matched the body sizes nicely.

To me, the Canon EOS-R was the clear winner, followed by the EOS-RP. But the poor build quality of the (huge!) lenses worries me a lot because the lens that was mounted was already broken. I never had a Canon camera in my life but I think I'm ready to switch because Canon did an outstanding job with these mirrorless cameras!
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Old 02-16-2019   #88
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Let me qualify my verdict a little bit:

Mirrorless technologies have led to miniaturization of camera bodies that I find too small to be ergonomic. Plus, any EVF is a poor representation of what the lens actually sees. Even with today's highest resolution EVFs, you still see pixels, some flicker, some lag time, and the image does not look natural because, after all, you look at a tiny electronic display.

To be honest, optical viewfinders of DSLRs are a thing of beauty!
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Old 02-16-2019   #89
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
Let me qualify my verdict a little bit:

Mirrorless technologies have led to miniaturization of camera bodies that I find too small to be ergonomic. Plus, any EVF is a poor representation of what the lens actually sees. Even with today's highest resolution EVFs, you still see pixels, some flicker, some lag time, and the image does not look natural because, after all, you look at a tiny electronic display.

To be honest, optical viewfinders of DSLRs are a thing of beauty!
Agreed. Optical trumps anything electronic. Part of the reason the D850 is such an appealing digital body to me is the VF.
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Old 02-17-2019   #90
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
Today I had a chance to hold a number of mirrorless cameras side-by-side and play with them for an hour or so: Canon EOS-RP, Canon EOS-R, Nikon Z7, Nikon Z6, Fuji X-Pro2, X100F, and a number of Fuji X-T models (plus many Sony/Olympus/Panasonic/etc I don't care much about). Here are my observations:

The Canon EOS bodies had by far the best build quality and they felt very solid and ergonomic in my hand. The top-panel LCD on the EOS-R is a nice feature and looks beautiful. The Canon EOS-RP body is a bit short, though, and I see the need for the available extension grip. The EVF was the best in terms of size, response (refresh rate and flicker), contrast & brightness, and the eye relieve was much larger than any of the other cameras. However, even though customers only had a few hours to play with these cameras, the plastic lens barrel was already broken and had a wide crack with sharp plastic peeling off! How come my Leica and Nikon AI-S lenses are decades old and work like new, and this lens didn't survive a few hours inside a store?!? The lens had trouble locking focus, but maybe this was because the lens barrel had a crack. Plus, the lens looked HUGE for the small bodies. What I hated is that the ON/OFF wheel is on the left of the bodies, so you need both hands to turn the camera on! What was Canon thinking?!

The Nikon Zs felt very solid, too, but the design and arrangements of the buttons didn't seem very natural and the bodies didn't feel as ergonomic in my hands as the Canon bodies.

The Fujis were surprisingly small, especially the X-T models. In fact, too small for my hands to feel comfortable. To my surprise, the optical viewfinder of the X-Pro2, X100F did nothing for me because they lacked frame lines, so I had no clue what I was framing and what would end up on the photos, and there was no other info in the optical viewfinder such as exposure time, f/stop, etc. Plus, I had no clue what the lens focused on until I looked at the photos on the display at the back. I thought to myself "Why am I even looking through this OVF if its adding zero information?" I thought maybe it was operator error and I need to add some electronic info somewhere in the menus? I gave up going through the menu after 10 minutes because I didn't find anything. Very odd. When I switched to the EVF, I found it rather small, the resolution was not very high, the contrast low and not bright enough. Plus, when flipping from OVF to EVF, they didn't match and the images jumped. Very disappointing. The zoom lenses that were mounted on the X-T had a huge lag when I zoomed in & out which felt very unnatural, and the zoom speed was not linear, it accelerated while zooming. Very weird! But I loved the small sizes of the lenses, which matched the body sizes nicely.

To me, the Canon EOS-R was the clear winner, followed by the EOS-RP. But the poor build quality of the (huge!) lenses worries me a lot because the lens that was mounted was already broken. I never had a Canon camera in my life but I think I'm ready to switch because Canon did an outstanding job with these mirrorless cameras!
Canon has always been able to build extremely ergonomic cameras and even their plastic Rebel bodies have had good build quality. Canon's AF has always been reliable, at least in my observation. I expect that lens was broken inside as well as out. I respect Nikon but I haven't used one in many years but I would think their cameras are the equal of Canons as far as build and function are concerned.

Your observation about the Fuji X-Pro2 and X100F has me a bit baffled. The part about the OVFs not having frame lines. Both cameras have frame lines that are pretty darn accurate in framing, at least as accurate as any separate viewfinder camera can be. While it's possible that both cameras were defective, it's unlikely both would have defects in the same feature. They also have a green indicator lights to show the AF sensor when in focus. It's likely someone moved settings on both cameras to something that turned these features off. I use both X-Pro1 and X-Pro2 cameras as well as the older X100S mainly with the OVFs and the experience you had with them is not at all the way these cameras work.
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Old 02-17-2019   #91
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
Let me qualify my verdict a little bit:

Mirrorless technologies have led to miniaturization of camera bodies that I find too small to be ergonomic. Plus, any EVF is a poor representation of what the lens actually sees. Even with today's highest resolution EVFs, you still see pixels, some flicker, some lag time, and the image does not look natural because, after all, you look at a tiny electronic display.

To be honest, optical viewfinders of DSLRs are a thing of beauty!
It depends on what you like. EVFs show me my exposure in a way that I love. I work with a lot of harsh shadows and I know what I’m getting with an evf.

And to the guy who said Fuji’s OVFs have no information, they most likely set it up that way in the shop and you just have to add everything back in the menus. But there so much information you can have in the ovf if you want it.
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Old 02-17-2019   #92
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
...
To my surprise, the optical viewfinder of the X-Pro2, X100F did nothing for me because they lacked frame lines, so I had no clue what I was framing and what would end up on the photos, and there was no other info in the optical viewfinder such as exposure time, f/stop, etc.
The added information is the same as with any RF. You can see what's outside the frame. Choosing OVF finder information content is straight forward. The frame lines are easy to see and you can invoke parallax correction. One can also select camera parameter information as well. The OVF can look as crowded or as clean as you need.

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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
...I gave up going through the menu after 10 minutes because I didn't find anything. Very odd.
Not so odd at all. You have to read the manual or do a Google search for tutorials to understand how to set the camera up for your needs. This is the case for most brands. Otherwise fiddling with the Menu is a waste of time. Personally, I find this to be absurd when the camera could be set up using a phone/tablet App connected via WiFi. But this is the case for many brands. Try to set up a new Nikon DSLR for action photography AF and, or use their AF Fine-Tune function without spending some quality time with the manual.

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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
...When I switched to the EVF, I found it rather small, the resolution was not very high, the contrast low and not bright enough.
Again, this is easy to change and optimize. But you have to read the manual.

Quote:
Originally Posted by giganova View Post
...Plus, when flipping from OVF to EVF, they didn't match and the images jumped. Very disappointing.
How could they match? This is not possible. They must be different in every way. However, it is true the X-Pro 2's OVF is not great with zoom lenses. For that matter it isn't great with telephoto lenses either. But this the case for many RF finders. Separately, maximum speed and responsiveness requires that all energy saving Menu options are disabled.
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Old 02-17-2019   #93
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And to the guy who said Fuji’s OVFs have no information, they most likely set it up that way in the shop and you just have to add everything back in the menus. But there so much information you can have in the ovf if you want it.
I would expect to see frame lines and exposure info in an optical viewfinder by default without having to read manuals and having to setup the camera -- especially for a demo model that is supposed to show what a camera can do. Every other digital camera with an optical viewfinder I have ever looked through showed theses essential informations. The user experience that Fuji is giving me left a very bad taste in my mouth.
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Old 02-17-2019   #94
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I would expect to see frame lines and exposure info in an optical viewfinder by default without having to read manuals and having to setup the camera -- especially for a demo model that is supposed to show what a camera can do. Every other digital camera with an optical viewfinder I have ever looked through showed theses essential informations. The user experience that Fuji is giving me left a very bad taste in my mouth.
So you spent ten minutes trying to figure it out and didn't ask the salesman demoing the camera?
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Old 02-17-2019   #95
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I would expect to see frame lines and exposure info in an optical viewfinder by default without having to read manuals and having to setup the camera -- especially for a demo model that is supposed to show what a camera can do. Every other digital camera with an optical viewfinder I have ever looked through showed theses essential informations. The user experience that Fuji is giving me left a very bad taste in my mouth.
When you buy it, everything in the OVF is turned on. I know this because I’ve used all 6 of the Fuji’s with an ovf and I always have to turn that garbage off except framelines, frames remaining, and battery life. Someone played with it in the store and turned it all off is my guess.
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Old 02-17-2019   #96
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I would expect to see frame lines and exposure info in an optical viewfinder by default without having to read manuals and having to setup the camera -- especially for a demo model that is supposed to show what a camera can do. Every other digital camera with an optical viewfinder I have ever looked through showed theses essential informations. The user experience that Fuji is giving me left a very bad taste in my mouth.
As we have tried to point out, someone has set the cameras up this way. That is one of the good things about digital cameras--you can set them up to suit the way you want to use them. It's also one of the infuriating things about digital cameras--determining how to set them up. You have to take the time to read instructions and fiddle around with the options until you're satisfied.
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Old 02-17-2019   #97
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You have to take the time to read instructions and fiddle around with the options until you're satisfied.
Or just ask the salesman demoing the camera. Beats futzing around with the menus for ten minutes and giving up.
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Old 02-17-2019   #98
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when I pick up a camera in a store to test it, I always go to settings tab and reset everything. makes things a lot simpler.
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Old 02-17-2019   #99
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Hi Stefan,

Just add a little about the Fuji OVF. By default, tramlines and exposure information is displayed, along with everything else you'd expect in a digital camera. You can turn off what you want. This brings me to the question of how do I know what is in focus? If you push the VF toggle switch the other way, it brings up a little box in the bottom right corner that shows a magnifies EVF view of the area where the focus point is at. It makes it trivially easy to check focus.
I don't read the manual, I just play with it. If there's something I'm curious about then I google it.
The good thing about modern digital cameras is you can set them up how you want.
The bad thing about modern digital cameras is you can set them up how you want.

In the end if they're too small for you then it makes no difference. But apart from a DSLR, they're the only OVF available.
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Old 02-17-2019   #100
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The EOS RP's sensor is assumed to be similar to the EOS 6D II.
Canon has stated explicitly that it is the same sensor except for modified microlenses.
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Old 02-18-2019   #101
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You were right: went back to the store and restored the X-Pro2 and X100F settings back to factory defaults and voila ... the OVF had all the frame lines and other electronic info restored. Awesome viewfinders!
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Old 02-18-2019   #102
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You were right: went back to the store and restored the X-Pro2 and X100F settings back to factory defaults and voila ... the OVF had all the frame lines and other electronic info restored. Awesome viewfinders!
So which one did you buy?
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Old 02-18-2019   #103
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So which one did you buy?
I'm still on the fence ... but are leaning towards the X-T3 with the 23/2 prime at the moment. The EVF is actually quite good (highest resolution EVF of any mirrorless right now), and the weather sealing and small form factor are awesome. The other camera that I still consider is the Canon EOS RP ... but I'm not sure whether the FF sensor is actually a good thing (shallow DOF, more sensitive) or not (makes the lenses huge compared to the Fuji lenses), plus its not weather sealed and the body is a bit too short to feel comfortable in my hands.

The X-Pro2 is amazing, too, but I know that I will always subconsciously compare it to my Leicas and find flaws. Thats why I think I shouldn't go with a digital rangefinder and get something different.

Edit: one other argument for the X-T3 is its ability to shoot 1080 videos at 120 fps. I am in the final editing stages of my second documentary film and I always envisioned slow-motion B-roll footage of crowded street scenes. The cameras that I used to shoot the film didn't have that ability (1080p/24 only) and with the X-T3 I could add that slow-motion b-roll footage which would make my film visually more interesting.
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Old 02-18-2019   #104
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Canikon doa. My opinion. Please don't scoff. 1200 bucks too much. Last digital basic class I saw...rebels kit lenses all sub $700 one Nikon hybrid the instructor a D850 myself a Df....1200 is what those people are going to spend on a phone. The camera for Christmas is something different now. Hyperbole my @ss. Bet.
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Old 02-19-2019   #105
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Ah, good point Contarama.

I hadn't paid much attention to the lowly Canon Rebel recently. They used to be everywhere--vacation spots, weddings, family get-togethers, etc. Now you see mostly phone cameras. But for someone wanting to get into photography with a real camera, I wondered if a Rebel still isn't appealing. After all, a basic T6 with kit zoom is now selling at B&H for less than $400.
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Old 02-19-2019   #106
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Canikon doa. My opinion. Please don't scoff. 1200 bucks too much. Last digital basic class I saw...rebels kit lenses all sub $700 one Nikon hybrid the instructor a D850 myself a Df....1200 is what those people are going to spend on a phone. The camera for Christmas is something different now. Hyperbole my @ss. Bet.
Cheap cameras are no longer sold in the volume required to make them profitable. No one wants a $400 Rebel with a kit lens when their phone is sufficient and in many ways more fit for the purpose. Each time smartphones improve in image quality, another chunk of the low end camera market disappears, first it was compacts (they lost on image quality), now it’s the entry DSLRs (they’re losing on ease of use - image quality is sufficient).

The manufacturers are moving to where the money is. The money is in enthusiasts, specifically enthusiasts who have some money to spend. $1200 is to much for what? Just because you think $1200 is too much, doesn’t mean everyone does. I’d never pay $100k+ for a car, but plenty of people do. Maybe they earn more than me, maybe they have different priorities, either way they think $100k+ on a car is worth it.
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Old 02-19-2019   #107
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Always wanted a full frame DSLR. Couldn't care less if it was mirrorless or not. In fact OVF is a plus in my book. Sp I picked up a Nikon D800 for tiny bucks (one third the price of that new Canon). 36 megs, baby!!! Plus I have tons of legacy Nikkors lenses around here somewhere.
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Old 02-19-2019   #108
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when I pick up a camera in a store to test it, I always go to settings tab and reset everything. makes things a lot simpler.
Excellent advice.


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Old 02-19-2019   #109
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Canon has stated explicitly that it is the same sensor except for modified microlenses.
Thanks.


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Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
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Old 02-19-2019   #110
giganova
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Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
Always wanted a full frame DSLR. Couldn't care less if it was mirrorless or not. In fact OVF is a plus in my book. Sp I picked up a Nikon D800 for tiny bucks (one third the price of that new Canon). 36 megs, baby!!! Plus I have tons of legacy Nikkors lenses around here somewhere.
Good for you, but not everybody wants to carry around such a big & heavy used DSLR that might have (tens of?) thousands of shutter actuation's already. Some people want to buy new gear and the new mirrorless cameras fit the bill for many.

While I was at the store yesterday I saw a bunch of young guys shopping for cameras. They only checked out the Sonys and Fujis mirrorless, but didn't even give the Nikon or Canon DSLRs a glance. I think it won't take long for DSLRs to disappear completely from the market.
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Old 02-20-2019   #111
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I ended up ordering a Fuji X-T3 with a 23/2 lens and extra battery. Weather sealing, better video features and the smaller form factor were the deciding factors. If Canon had smaller native lenses I would have ordered that, but these comically huge lenses didn't do it for me.
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Old 02-20-2019   #112
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Originally Posted by giganova View Post
I ended up ordering a Fuji X-T3 with a 23/2 lens and extra battery. Weather sealing, better video features and the smaller form factor were the deciding factors. If Canon had smaller native lenses I would have ordered that, but these comically huge lenses didn't do it for me.
As someone who just made the switch from MF film bodies to a Fuji, take the time to learn the AF modes and set up the camera as you like it. And don't be afraid to change the setup as you get use to it.

Enjoy it, I look forward to seeing what you do with it.
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Old 02-20-2019   #113
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Good for you, but not everybody wants to carry around such a big & heavy used DSLR that might have (tens of?) thousands of shutter actuation's already. Some people want to buy new gear and the new mirrorless cameras fit the bill for many.

While I was at the store yesterday I saw a bunch of young guys shopping for cameras. They only checked out the Sonys and Fujis mirrorless, but didn't even give the Nikon or Canon DSLRs a glance. I think it won't take long for DSLRs to disappear completely from the market.
Like I said....too late for Canikon....Sony and Fuji seized the day already. Mass market buys a phone for Christmas and if they buy a camera it is Sony or Fuji or an entry level DSLR. Canon is smart with the $1200 rig though...they'll sell some for sure to the long time enthusiasts. The rest will grab a classic old film unit from the bay and at a premium price. Just my take and I've been wrong before so....

Bottom line - some big players are going to die sooner rather than later.
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Old 02-21-2019   #114
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Like I said....too late for Canikon....Sony and Fuji seized the day already. Mass market buys a phone for Christmas and if they buy a camera it is Sony or Fuji or an entry level DSLR. Canon is smart with the $1200 rig though...they'll sell some for sure to the long time enthusiasts. The rest will grab a classic old film unit from the bay and at a premium price. Just my take and I've been wrong before so....

Bottom line - some big players are going to die sooner rather than later.
In what world does the mass market get $1000-2000 Christmas presents? Nikon and Canon are not in trouble despite your anecdotal evidence.
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Old 02-21-2019   #115
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As someone who just made the switch from MF film bodies to a Fuji, take the time to learn the AF modes and set up the camera as you like it. And don't be afraid to change the setup as you get use to it.

...
Good advice!

Also, be sure to Power Management options in the Menu system are not set to extend battery life. These can really slow things down. In my view invoking Power Management is only useful as a last ditch means to use the camera when the battery is about to die.

Take the time to download a PDF of the manual. You can find it on this page.

Don't forget to use the most recent the firmware for the camera and lens.(link). The download page will have a PDF manual addendum as well.
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Basically, I mean, ah—well, let’s say that for me anyway when a photograph is interesting, it’s interesting because of the kind of photographic problem it states—which has to do with the . . . contest between content and form.
Garry Winogrand
williamchuttonjr.com
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Old 02-21-2019   #116
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Originally Posted by michaelwj View Post
As someone who just made the switch from MF film bodies to a Fuji, take the time to learn the AF modes and set up the camera as you like it. And don't be afraid to change the setup as you get use to it.

Enjoy it, I look forward to seeing what you do with it.

I was recently in a similar situation. I would add to the above good advice that you WILL hit buttons with your thumb, fingers, and face when you had no intention of doing so. Learn your settings and then learn how to quickly get back to them without swearing randomly.
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Old 02-21-2019   #117
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Good advice on battery power mode, reading the manual (what?!), and changing user settings -- will do!

But hey, just because I bought a digital camera doesn't mean that I won't give up 35mm and MF film photography. For me, it all about adding tools to my pallet also I can explore possibilities.
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