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120 / 220 film RF's 120 / 220 format rangefinders including Fuji, Koni-Omega, Mamiya Press, Linhof 6x7/6x9 cameras, Mamiya 6/7 among others, but excluding the 120 folders and the Voigtlander 667 cameras that have their own forums.

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Any Koni Omega Users, commments?
Old 03-03-2005   #1
canonetc
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Any Koni Omega Users, commments?

Hi anyone out there ever used a Koni Omega 6x7? I'm considering one as an inexpensive 6x7 outfit, and would appreciate any comments anyone has. The link to the ebay item is here:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...e=STRK:MEWA:IT

For the price it seems like a nice investment, leaf-shutter lens sounds great for flash at any speed. I'd prefer Plaubel 67, but hey....

thanks in advance,

Chris
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Old 03-03-2005   #2
Wayne R. Scott
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Chris,

Check these sites on Koni-Omega. For what it is worth, I have a Koni-Omega 200. It is kind of a funky camera but it grows on you. The 6x7 format is one of the "ideal" formats in that it can be enlarged to 8x10 with out cropping any of the image.

http://www.photoethnography.com/Clas...html~mainFrame

http://www.koni-omega.org/

I would be suspect of the film back on the one you are looking at as it shows some hard use, maybe by a wedding photographer. It may have light leaks and frame spacing problems. I would ask seller if he has shot any film through it.

Wayne
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Old 03-03-2005   #3
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I think you're looking for comments on the 100 & 200 rangefinder cameras which I've never used. My Koni was the Omegaflex-M 6x7 and it was a jewel that I wish I still had. The Koni lenses for the Omegaflex are simply superb and I'm sure the RF lenses are every bit as good.

Walker
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Old 03-03-2005   #4
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I have used the Koni Rapid, M, 100, 200 and the Omegaflex TLR version. I was very impressed with the lenses. High contrast and very sharp. I really liked the interchangeable backs on the M, 200 and Omegaflex cameras. The 58mm (also rebadged as a 60mm) lens was my favorite. I have still have a 16x20 glossy enlargement that I made of Glacier that is super sharp. As for the backs, they are easy to put new light seals in but if the indexing rack is worn out the back is good only for parts. I have used a diamond burr to put new steps in a rack but that is a lot of work. Contrary to what I have read about "Slamming" the wind lever in, this is what causes damage. Gentle but firm winding will work and will also keep from damaging the rack teeth.

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Old 03-03-2005   #5
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I have a Koni Omega 200, very HEAVY, get a good neck strap!
I carried mine around Key West. Fla. one weekend (It'll really make you look like a tourist ). The lenses are great, try and get the 59/60mm with viewfinder, very nice!. Also look for spare film backs and dark slides, using one of these takes a little time, it's not exactly a point and shoot but when you get the roll of "chromes" back from the lab it's worth it!
I need to adjust my rangerfindr and shoot with it, it's a neat camera, good luck!

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Old 03-03-2005   #6
denishr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canonetc
Hi anyone out there ever used a Koni Omega 6x7? I'm considering one as an inexpensive 6x7 outfit, and would appreciate any comments anyone has.
Chris, check out the sites which Wayne listed - lots of useful info there.

Koni Omega M and Koni Rapid 200 have special backs, consisting of two parts, and those enable you to change film mid-roll...
Koni Omega (not "M") and Koni Rapid 100 models have simpler film backs, and you cannot change film mid-roll.

Those two types of backs are not interchangeable.

I have a Koni Omega, and two backs for it (120 and 220). It's a well-built, sturdy camera, made for professional use. The quality of 90/3.5 lenses is outstanding. People often say it's comparable to Hassys - but I wouldn't go so far...

Be aware that the camera is rather heavy, and indeed you will need to get a very good (neoprene?) neck strap

All in all, mine doesn't get much use, precisely because of the weight.

In my opinion, the Koni Omega is the real "Texas Leica"

Denis
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Old 03-11-2005   #7
canonetc
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Hey thanks All. Would anyone recommend the 100 over the 200?

Denis, have you ever tried to do closeup shots (well, as close as you can get) with the Koni? If so, how did you compensate for what may be radical parallax? The viewfinder sits so high above the film plane, I wondered about it.... thanks for your reply in advance!

Chris
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Old 03-11-2005   #8
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Chris, as first, I must confess I posted some incorrect info in my previous post.... regarding camera backs, I think. Nothing serious - but do check those sites mentioned above first, if you need more info.

As for close focusing, I've never tried it. People use "Auto-up" attachments for such stuff - they are rare and apparently pricey. The closest focus on mine with 90mm lens is about 1m.
The viewfinder is paralax corrected - i.e. the framelines move as you focus closer.

It's not really a camera for close-ups - like any other rangefinder. Think of it as a Leica with 50mm lens - on steroids ))

And keep in mind that the Koni is HEAVY - that's the only reason why I don't use it much.

From what I've heard, it was used primarily by wedding photographers -which gives you an idea of the type of shots for which it is best suited. The lens are sharp, and I've also seen some pretty good landscapes shot with a Koni.

As a sidenote, my Koni Omega (close-up of it) is featured on the back cover of the RFF book

It IS a rangefinder, after all!

Denis
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Old 04-01-2005   #9
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I have a Koni Omega 100 in transit to me right now. I used one back in the '70s briefly and was impressed with the quality of the camera itself and the lens. Although it is primarily known as a "wedding camera" I believe it was originally designed as a more compact press-type camera. Unfortunately, just about the time the Koni hit the market newspapers started switching to 35mm. The fact that it stayed in production for so long is a tribute to its design.
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Old 04-02-2005   #10
andrew
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I think it's been covered by the people above, but I'll add my two cents worth:

I've got a Koni (100), two lenses (58mm and 90mm), and both the Auto-Ups (close-up adapters) described above. It is a heavy beast, but not impossible to lug around provided you use a wider neck strap. I recently took it (and a QL17) out to San Francisco and traveled down highway 1 with it. I used the Canon for street shooting and the Koni for landscapes and other work. It was hooked to a tripod as I walked through Muir Woods, so I wouldn't think of it as a street shooting camera (though I've tried some of that, too). It's big and bulky, but the glass is extremely sharp and the film back is designed to keep the film very flat. Once I figure out a way to scan my mf negs affordably, I hope to post some of the images I've made with the Koni (in CA and elsewhere)

As for the system, the camera is built like a tank (I've read it was designed for the military) and has a lot of quirks in the safety catches (and that ratcheting film advance deafens the rather quiet shutter). Still, the negatives look great (I use a Hasselblad slr, too, and I think Koni is a lot more bang for the buck), and I'm currently hunting for the fabled 135mm hexanon - check some of the sites above for info this holy grail of Konica glass.

If your camera or back needs work I recommend Greg Weber:

www.webercamera.com

He's fast, affordable, and really helpful (he often gives a lot of advice and has been known to walk people through repairs they might be willing and able to do themselves - I'm all thumbs, so I'll send my stuff to him).

I saved a long time to buy my used Hasselblad; had I known about the quality and affordability of the Koni (Rapid) Omega lenses, I'd probably reconsider my initial purchase of a medium format system. Now having both, I see the advantages of each and I really do like my Koni (it gets some great stares out on the street and old wedding photographer and press guys often start a conversation). Still, I got a barely used 100, 90mm, and back (former property of a high ranking MA Police official) for $350 (my inital Hasselblad set up - 500cm, 80 cf, and a-12 - was $1000 more).

Buy an Op-Tech or similar neck strap, and have some fun with 6x7.
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Old 05-09-2012   #11
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Hello everyone!

I've got a Koni Omega Rapid M, and although I've grasped most of the functions and already took some succesful shots with it, I don't get how to load the back in an easy way.

The manual I got from butkus.org says I should turn the "flange" of the take-up spool to wind up the film, before inserting the back. Is this simply the edge of the spool? I can't turn that using my fingers, it sits pretty firmly and there's no grip.
Have I misunderstood? Because the only option seems to be loading the roll by rolling up the film to the correct position and THEN inserting the take-up spool – a big hassle.

Tips, corrections – can anyone help?

EDIT: I have found that I can roll the take-up spool if the winding arm is pulled all the way out. Maybe it also works with the arm pushed properly all the way in, and this is where I failed?
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Old 05-09-2012   #12
JRG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kabkos View Post
... The 58mm (also rebadged as a 60mm) lens was my favorite. ...

karl
This idea keeps getting repeated, but it appears to be not quite correct. If you look at the owner's manuals for these two lenses, you'll see two slightly different lens diagrams. Here's an earlier post on the subject: http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...ad.php?t=63826

In any case, the Koni-Omega series offers a great deal of bang for the buck. And both the 58mm and 80mm lenses have excellent reputations. (Mine is the 58mm, and it's been a great performer.)

Good luck with your K-O purchase.
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Old 05-09-2012   #13
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Great cameras, and substantially different in operation from virtually anything else. One piece of advice -- with regard to the "M" and 200, which are essentially the same camera and feature the mid-roll change, you need not just a spare back, but a spare magazine (into which the backs fit). I see lots of backs for sale, but magazines seem to be rare items. So unless you really need to be changing films mid-roll, the non-magazine models like the 100 will suit you fine.

A second piece of advice -- should you be lucky enough to obtain the 135mm lens, be aware that not all the cameras have framelines for it, since it was introduced in the middle of the run of the camera. Both the 100 and 200 have these framelines.
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How important are mid roll film changes to you
Old 05-09-2012   #14
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How important are mid roll film changes to you

First, and this may come without saying, but to do a mid range film change you need two complete backs and magazines for efficiency. Personally, outside of professional use, I never saw a need for midroll changes, so I would opt for the 100, with it's less complicated back/camera interface.

Second, the backs were meant for hard use. There is a distinct difference between being too much of a "wuss" on the frame changes, and "hammering" the back to death. Frame advances are best done with a rapid, firm single stroke. Otherwise the frame spacing gets boggled up, or the back just gets beat into submission and failure.

And frame changes are noisy. I don't know how anyone ever used Koni Omega's for weddings, yet it is purported to be an excellent wedding camera, if you preload a bunch of backs. The sound of the back advancing the film would easily flush a covey of Chukkar off a hillside, without using a hunting dog.

However, IQ was one of the best Medium Format camera's I ever shot. I didn't mind the weight. I just hired a sherpa. It is only 6X7 as far as I recall. I don't think I ever saw any other format options in the backs.

I didn't look at the listing. It would be nice if it were a two back deal. I don't who might rebuild the backs or if there were comments about frame spacing, but I've seen OEM new backs on eBay go from $200 to $300 alone.
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Old 05-13-2012   #15
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Well everything have been said.
This camera replaced most of my MF gear, I only kept a Semflex and a Bessa RF for really precise pictures.

It's a rugged beast quite unbreakable with neat lenses.

As a repair tech I can only say that it's strong and hard to break; on most of them you'll only need new foam seals, a shutter CLA and some adjusting on the film advance system (based on friction, no lube allowed).

I never saw any needing a RF calibration except in case of huge impact or diy wandering...

It's only dark side is that it's definitely not made for people with small hands, don't think of it if you're under 1.8m tall or have some bad shoulder... For healthy people it's weight is quite a good thing, as you can manage to shoot at 1/8th s without a tripod (I managed to get blur on a perfectly calibrated Bessa II at 1/30th).
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