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Can the M6's meter handle an orange (Heliopan #22) filter?
Old 05-25-2018   #1
Whateverist
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Can the M6's meter handle an orange (Heliopan #22) filter?

I would think that a TTL meter would be able to handle any filter, but I've seen mentions that with certain filter colours even TTL meters can be thrown off if the colour clashes with what wavelengths the meter is sensitive to.

I'll be sure to experiment some once the filter arrives, but in the meantime, does anyone have experience with the effect coloured filters have on an M6 meter? Does it require exposure compensation?
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Old 05-25-2018   #2
Dante_Stella
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whateverist View Post
I would think that a TTL meter would be able to handle any filter, but I've seen mentions that with certain filter colours even TTL meters can be thrown off if the colour clashes with what wavelengths the meter is sensitive to.

I'll be sure to experiment some once the filter arrives, but in the meantime, does anyone have experience with the effect coloured filters have on an M6 meter? Does it require exposure compensation?
It will almost always require exposure compensation. The Monochrom has substantially the same meter and requires a little experimentation to get the filter factors right.

Point the camera at a grey wall and meter without the filter. Then meter with. If the difference isn't 2 stops, your starting point is that difference. In fact, that will be the difference for the "average" scene. You can always burn a few frames to figure out what the correct compensation is for your camera.

Dante
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Old 05-25-2018   #3
Steve M.
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What you read is true. Some cameras will factor in the right exposure w/ filters, some won't. Dante had a good idea for you. Also, google what the filter factor is for your filter, screw it on, and see if the camera's compensation agrees w/ that. Remember to be in good outside light when you do this.

Fortunately for you, you shoot film, so a stop off here and there isn't gonna make a huge difference. Film can handle it, digital not so much. The filter factor is just a starting point anyway. You or I may like the exposure factor differently, depending on the film and the scene you're shooting.
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Old 05-25-2018   #4
Whateverist
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Thanks. I'll make sure to check the meter with and without the filter.
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Old 05-25-2018   #5
Deardorff38
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I used an M6 and later an MP for years. I live and work in the mountains so the orange filter was pretty much a default. Careful choice of working ISO and scene metering as always. Always got good results
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Old 05-25-2018   #6
samuelphoto
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Since you're shooting negative film, the camera's TTL metering should work well, at least it did for me when I had a M6.
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Old 05-25-2018   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dante_Stella View Post
Point the camera at a grey wall and meter without the filter. Then meter with. If the difference isn't 2 stops, your starting point is that difference. In fact, that will be the difference for the "average" scene. You can always burn a few frames to figure out what the correct compensation is for your camera.

Dante
It is often written on the filter. Something like x2.
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Old 05-25-2018   #8
Freakscene
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Dante's comments mirror my experience. Apart from the Nikon F5 and F6, every camera I've ever used with ttl metering has needed some compensation for filters, particularly for those darker than a medium yellow/K2/Wrattan #8. I have a table somewhere for my M7s and MPs but they have different meters from an M6TTL.

The MM and Typ246 require more fine tuning than film cameras in my experience.

Marty
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Old 05-25-2018   #9
Ronald M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freakscene View Post
Dante's comments mirror my experience. Apart from the Nikon F5 and F6, every camera I've ever used with ttl metering has needed some compensation for filters, particularly for those darker than a medium yellow/K2/Wrattan #8. I have a table somewhere for my M7s and MPs but they have different meters from an M6TTL.

The MM and Typ246 require more fine tuning than film cameras in my experience.

Marty
Yes Yellow ok, experiment to find the rest.

But remember, always best to meter with no filter, add filter compensation, screw on filter and make pic. This is for nit pickers, but valid. Subject color causes errors any other way.
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Old 05-25-2018   #10
Freakscene
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald M View Post
Yes Yellow ok, experiment to find the rest.

But remember, always best to meter with no filter, add filter compensation, screw on filter and make pic. This is for nit pickers, but valid. Subject color causes errors any other way.
And even better to use a colour meter and adjust for incident and subject colours, and B&W film spectral sensitivity, but only if you have time. The beautiful thing about the Nikon F5 and F6 is that they have colour meters built in.

In practice, this seldom makes that much difference, but in some really critical situations it can. Some microscope cameras in the late film era had different meter settings for a range of films and filters.

Marty
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