Doing C-41 First time since 1995
Old 12-18-2018   #1
mpaniagua
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Doing C-41 First time since 1995

Hello
Been doing b/w since 1988. Did some color C41/E6 briefly from 1991 to 1995 (working on a joint venture), but stopped, mostly due to convenience.

Fast forward to present day, color itch has been on me for some time now and 2 days ago ordered Ultrafine Unicolor C41 powder kit.

Mostly I intend to develop and scan with my 35mm film scanner and some 120 with Epson V550.

Any tips/tricks/suggestion related to C-41 process? (in particular with powder Unicolor).

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Marcelo
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Old 12-18-2018   #2
dmr
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It's super easy, far more easy than I suspected, particularly since I picked up the gizmo below a while back.

I've used the Cinestill and Arista kits. I did not use Unicolor specifically because it's powder and not as convenient for one-shot and two-shot occasional use like I do.

Results, for the most part, seem to be equal to lab processing.

The biggest issue I've had is water spotting! The consensus both here and on the site formerly known as APUG is to NOT use a squeegee at all. I've gotten so I can fairly reliably shake most of the water (stabilizer) off of the film on the reel before I hang it up to dry.

I started doing it myself since the one remaining Real Photo Shop (tm) in the area that does it is now on about a week turn-around and I want immediate gratification!

Since I do maybe one roll every few weeks, I'm careful to fill the dead space in each bottle with Bloxygen and promptly put it back in the fridge.

I will be trying E6 as soon as I shoot something worth shooting with the new E100 film, probably in the next two weeks.

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Old 12-18-2018   #3
Ko.Fe.
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Just follow instructions and take it easy. With scanning color correcting is not difficult in post processing. Modern c-41 doesn't need formalin, btw.
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Old 12-18-2018   #4
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I started doing C41 earlier this summer. Easy peasy. The secret is a water bath to hold the developing temperature at 102F. Some folks use a “Souve” cooking heating element to hold the water bath temperature at precisely 102F. I don’t use one, but folks who have swear by them.

Jim B.
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Old 12-18-2018   #5
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I do it my kitchen sink. I get the developer to 102 and just go for it.. I never really have an issue, been doing it for a few years now. I scan my negatives, so it's easy to fix any color issues.
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Old 12-18-2018   #6
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I don't fuss about a bath to keep the temp to 102.

My chems are in my bathroom. I start to warm the dev and Blix up first to 102 while getting everything else setup. Once I get to 102 I put some warm water in the container I measure my dev in---helps keep the chem at 102 longer. Once all measuring containers are ready I use my iPhone and play music while watching the timer.

I use a Coolscan V for 35mm and Epson v500 for 120 and 70mm. Vuescan for software and pretty much everything auto. Colors come out fine for me most of the time--and if they don't I figure it's the film or the light of the day. Auto Color Correction in PS does a great job bringing removing the cast if there is one.
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Old 12-18-2018   #7
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I found C-41 processing was way easier than developing black and white film. Freestyle was my favorite kit. I still have some C-41 and plan to use it with Ifords XP 2 film.

Info on XP 2:
https://www.ilfordphoto.com/amfile/f...roduct_id/704/

Look at all the different black and white developers that can be used. It can be confusing.

However, I quit color developing and make all of my color photographs with digital capture.

Scanning is not my cup of tea. I enjoy using Photoshop with ACR and capture 100% RAW. I guess I’m a nerd!
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Old 12-18-2018   #8
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Dmr, nice development kit!!!! Also, the OP should read this for scanning your C-41:

http://www.coltonallen.com/getting-t...epson-flatbed/
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Old 12-18-2018   #9
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I use Freestyle with no problems. Not quite as easy as B&W but not hard either, just a step or two more. I use a picnic cooler large enough to hold all the jugs and about 4~6 gallons of water to maintain the temperature.
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Old 12-18-2018   #10
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Same as above , but keep thermometer in picnic cooler and keep water temp very close to 102 degrees and have had great results , not to mention considerably more rolls developed by extending initial time in developer . It's really kinda easy . Peter
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Old 12-19-2018   #11
mpaniagua
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thanks for feedback guys!. Kit just got in on the mail.

Also order some Kodak Plus 200 film to test.

Lets see how it goes. Probably will do some over the week end.

Regards

Marcelo
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Old 12-19-2018   #12
mpaniagua
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
Dmr, nice development kit!!!! Also, the OP should read this for scanning your C-41:

http://www.coltonallen.com/getting-t...epson-flatbed/

Reading now john, Thanks

Marcelo
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Old 12-19-2018   #13
dmr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
Dmr, nice development kit!!!!
Thanks.

As I think I've mentioned here before, it's not really mine but mine to use until/if the original owner (who moved to Texas and no longer shoots film) wants it back. It sure takes the drudgery out of it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by charjohncarter View Post
Also, the OP should read this for scanning your C-41:
I've read that and do have one difference in the way I do it. I make very few if any level tweaks while scanning, but do it all in Gimp after scanning.

There was quite a learning curve in scanning, as I experienced back in 2005 or so. As with developing, attention to detail is very important.

I've learned that scanning at absolute maximum resolution works best for me, even if I don't intend to do a 13x19 print.
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Old 12-19-2018   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmr View Post

I've read that and do have one difference in the way I do it. I make very few if any level tweaks while scanning, but do it all in Gimp after scanning.

There was quite a learning curve in scanning, as I experienced back in 2005 or so. As with developing, attention to detail is very important.

I've learned that scanning at absolute maximum resolution works best for me, even if I don't intend to do a 13x19 print.
I've made a few tweaks of my own too. But really his ideas were very important for me to get consistent results.
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Old 12-26-2018   #15
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I've used the Cinestill and Arista kits. I did not use Unicolor specifically because it's powder and not as convenient for one-shot and two-shot occasional use like I do.

Results, for the most part, seem to be equal to lab processing.

The biggest issue I've had is water spotting! The consensus both here and on the site formerly known as APUG is to NOT use a squeegee at all. I've gotten so I can fairly reliably shake most of the water (stabilizer) off of the film on the reel before I hang it up to dry.
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To solve your spotting problem, do two small changes:

1) When you mix your stabilizer, use distilled water. That will avoid any spots from hard water deposits.

2) Add a drop or two (no more) of Photoflo or similar wetting agent to the stabilizer. The final solution will flow off the film when hung, not bead up. Do not use a squeegee.

Perfect results are guaranteed.
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