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Nikon Historical Society Jason Schneider is perhaps the world's most famous expert on camera collecting.  Over the course of his long career he has been a photojournalist, a commercial photographer, and a camera test lab manager.  For 18 years he wrote his incredibly influential Camera Collector monthly column at the still deeply missed MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY magazine where Jason was also Editorial Director. Modern was followed by his 16 year stint as Editor-Chief of Popular Photography, then the world's largest imaging magazine. Along the way many of his Modern Camera collecting articles were republished in the wonderful 3 volume set JASON SCHNEIDER ON CAMERA COLLECTING.

Focusing on a wide range of interests, Jason has been an avid photography enthusiast, writer, and lecturer amazingly enough since his early teens.  He graduated Magna Cum Laude from Washington Square College of New York University, where he majored in English Literature, minored in Classics, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. Schneiderís poetry and critical essays on poetry have been published in the NYU college literary magazine and in various collections.  He's currently working on a book on Emily Dickinson's poetry "Understanding Emily Dickinson. A Reader's Guide To The Enlightened Master."

Jason is an expert on most things photography:  no only camera collecting and analog photography, but also digital photography, the history of camera design and technology, the business of photography, what it is to be a photographer, and as he once proved to me, the best place to buy bratworst at Photokina in Cologne. If all of that was not enough, Jason is genuinely one of the nicest, most knowledgeable and interesting human beings you will ever likely have the good fortune to meet on the net.


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INTERESTING Nikon Leica Thread Mount Rangefinder Prototypes
Old 09-02-2018   #1
xayraa33
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INTERESTING Nikon Leica Thread Mount Rangefinder Prototypes

I have heard about these Nikon LTM prototype RF camera bodies but I never have seen photos of them, till now.


http://members.webone.com.au/~gbrown..._prototype.htm
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Old 09-02-2018   #2
richardHaw
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i have a couple of pictures of those prototypes
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What does 'M' stand for?
Old 03-02-2019   #3
wes loder
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What does 'M' stand for?

I have seen others state that the 'M' stands for medium format, but it does not make sense. Why would NK want to point out that its camera was midway between 24X32 and 24X36? It wanted to sell a camera that would conform to standard film-processing machines. I have always believed and continue to contend that M stands for "modified." That way, buyers would know that such a Nikon had been corrected to conform to a standard film advance.
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Old 03-02-2019   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wes loder View Post
I have seen others state that the 'M' stands for medium format, but it does not make sense. Why would NK want to point out that its camera was midway between 24X32 and 24X36? It wanted to sell a camera that would conform to standard film-processing machines. I have always believed and continue to contend that M stands for "modified." That way, buyers would know that such a Nikon had been corrected to conform to a standard film advance.
I find it odd that Nippon Kogaku wanted a product for world wide sales, no different than the other up-start miniature camera makers in post war Japan and yet played around with 24x32 and 24x34 formats.

The idea of getting more photos from one roll of film might have sounded great in Japan that was rebuilding from the destruction of war and wages were low but it was a bad idea to go against the mainstream, even for fitting full frame in Kodachrome cards alone.

Yes, I know that even German camera makers had made cameras in 24x24 formats ( Zeiss and Robot, for example) but these were not mainstream and sold poorly and or were for specialised applications.
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Old 03-02-2019   #5
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very interesting l bet that museum is worth a look round
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Nikon formatting
Old 03-08-2019   #6
wes loder
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Nikon formatting

Quote:
Originally Posted by xayraa33 View Post
I find it odd that Nippon Kogaku wanted a product for world wide sales, no different than the other up-start miniature camera makers in post war Japan and yet played around with 24x32 and 24x34 formats.

The idea of getting more photos from one roll of film might have sounded great in Japan that was rebuilding from the destruction of war and wages were low but it was a bad idea to go against the mainstream, even for fitting full frame in Kodachrome cards alone.
Minolta "invented" the 24X32 format and promoted it heavily to the Japanese government, who, in turn, specified that projectors sold in schools had to use that format. In 1948 the 24X 32 format looked like it could be a winner. Tokyo Kogaku's 35mm Minion As and Olympus' first cameras also used the 24X32 format. Gasser and Liholm, the American importers, refused to take any more Nikons in the 24X32 format after importing about 72. The Nikon camera could not be expanded to 24X36 without changing the entire body casting. 24X34 was the workable compromise. The Nikon could be expanded to that size and a standard eight sprocket advance made it compatible with automated processing machines. The Nikon did not go to 24X36 until the Nikon S2 of late 1954.
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Old 03-13-2019   #7
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i actually prefer that format to be frank

for printing purposes...
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