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Nikon Historical Society Jason Schneider is perhaps the world's most famous expert on camera collecting.  Over the course of his long career he has been a photojournalist, a commercial photographer, and a camera test lab manager.  For 18 years he wrote his incredibly influential Camera Collector monthly column at the still deeply missed MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY magazine where Jason was also Editorial Director. Modern was followed by his 16 year stint as Editor-Chief of Popular Photography, then the world's largest imaging magazine. Along the way many of his Modern Camera collecting articles were republished in the wonderful 3 volume set JASON SCHNEIDER ON CAMERA COLLECTING.

Focusing on a wide range of interests, Jason has been an avid photography enthusiast, writer, and lecturer amazingly enough since his early teens.  He graduated Magna Cum Laude from Washington Square College of New York University, where he majored in English Literature, minored in Classics, and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. Schneiderís poetry and critical essays on poetry have been published in the NYU college literary magazine and in various collections.  He's currently working on a book on Emily Dickinson's poetry "Understanding Emily Dickinson. A Reader's Guide To The Enlightened Master."

Jason is an expert on most things photography:  no only camera collecting and analog photography, but also digital photography, the history of camera design and technology, the business of photography, what it is to be a photographer, and as he once proved to me, the best place to buy bratworst at Photokina in Cologne. If all of that was not enough, Jason is genuinely one of the nicest, most knowledgeable and interesting human beings you will ever likely have the good fortune to meet on the net.


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The Rotoloni Report 3: This is War!
Old 01-31-2019   #1
eckmanmj
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The Rotoloni Report 3: This is War!

I bring to you the third in a series of chats I've had with Nikon Historian Robert Rotoloni. This time we dive deep into Nippon Kogaku's early history and their significant role during World War II.

While many other companies contributed towards their home countries war efforts during World War II, Nippon Kogaku's had an unusually large role, and it was through their efforts leading up to and during the war which allowed Nippon Kogaku to succeed afterwards.

We all know how quickly the Japanese optics industry rose to prominence in the years after the war ended, but how did that happen so fast? Read my article to find out!

http://www.mikeeckman.com/2019/01/th...3-this-is-war/

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Old 01-31-2019   #2
Kai-san
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Thanks Mike, very nice and interesting report. In 1972 I went out to buy my first camera and had my mind set on a Ricoh model. But the guy in the shop said; "Nah, this is what you want" and placed a nicely used Nikkormat FTn with a Nikkor S 50mm f1.4 on the counter. I was sold and never regretted that purchase. Today my favourite Nikon is the F3, but in addition I also have an FE and a 35TI. If I can find a nice FM3A for the right price I will certainly go for it.
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Old 01-31-2019   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eckmanmj View Post
I bring to you the third in a series of chats I've had with Nikon Historian Robert Rotoloni. This time we dive deep into Nippon Kogaku's early history and their significant role during World War II.

While many other companies contributed towards their home countries war efforts during World War II, Nippon Kogaku's had an unusually large role, and it was through their efforts leading up to and during the war which allowed Nippon Kogaku to succeed afterwards.

We all know how quickly the Japanese optics industry rose to prominence in the years after the war ended, but how did that happen so fast? Read my article to find out!

http://www.mikeeckman.com/2019/01/th...3-this-is-war/

They misspelled Novak.
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Old 01-31-2019   #4
xayraa33
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Great reading article !

Should have mentioned that Dr Karl Bauer president of Zeiss USA being angry and p*ssed off at Jacob Deschin , for writing an article in the New York Times in December 1950 that mentioned that the upstart Nikkor lenses were better than German made lenses.
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