Why are my images turning out like this? Home developing b/w
Old 3 Weeks Ago   #1
romeld
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Why are my images turning out like this? Home developing b/w

Hi all,

I've just started home developing and I'm not really sure where I've gone wrong with my last couple of rolls. The first roll I developed turned out great but now I'm getting these results. I'm not exactly sure if it's a light leak or not because they're not on every single one of my images.

My developing process looks like this for my last 2 rolls of TriX400
D76 1+1 300ml 9minutes 45 seconds, agitating for the first minute then 10 seconds every minute
Water stop bath 1 minute
Kodak Fixer 300ml 3 minutes agitating every minute

Here are what my images have looked like:





Any advice would be great!
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #2
kknox
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Did you pre wash the film? Mabe old chemicals. I have never has that with hc-110 or mono bath one shot for 7 min. They all look overexposed to me. I had old chemicals thst looked like this to me.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #3
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I fix my negatives for about 6-8 min when I use HC -110. You can cut a small piece of film leader and let it sit in some fixer until clear. Time it then dix all your film dor that time. Might help. Good luck.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #4
jim_jm
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Definitely too short of a fixing time for Kodak fixer. 5 mins is the minimum with fresh fixer, and I extend those times as the fixer gets older. 8 -10 minutes is not uncommon for me. I agitate for the first 30 sec, then four inversions every minute after that. Like kknox said, you can test the fixer with a piece of film leader, then double that time to get your minimum fixing time. Fixing for an extra few minutes will not harm the film. Also, using hypo-clear will help to shorten your wash times.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #5
jim_jm
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Also, you may be able to improve these images by re-fixing the film for another few minutes, then the standard wash times.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim_jm View Post
Definitely too short of a fixing time for Kodak fixer. 5 mins is the minimum with fresh fixer, and I extend those times as the fixer gets older. 8 -10 minutes is not uncommon for me. I agitate for the first 30 sec, then four inversions every minute after that. Like kknox said, you can test the fixer with a piece of film leader, then double that time to get your minimum fixing time. Fixing for an extra few minutes will not harm the film. Also, using hypo-clear will help to shorten your wash times.



I think you're right.


Original poster: if you're using the powdered Kodak Fixer, be aware that the fixing times for it are very long. I would fix for ten minutes if I had to use it, but I would not use that fixer on modern films if I had a choice. Get a modern rapid fixer. Kodak's liquid Rapid Fix is fine, as is Ilford's. Fixing times with them is about 5 minutes with most films.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #7
leicapixie
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Fixer suggestion is Ilford Rapid Fixer, it don't smell as bad.
Fixes fast, use wet piece of negative for "clear"test.
Double the time.
I actually use 2 fixers, it's easy and last a bit longer..
My water solution stands in bottle for weeks before usage.
It helps "ph" level. I filter all solutions prior to developing and fixing.
Use coffee filters in funnel. One for each solution.
Developer is HC-110, a 1-use solution.
I like a Stop Bath, Kodak's with awful smell..
Photo-Flo for rinse.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #8
sepiareverb
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Is there a milkiness to the emulsion side of the film? I will agree on insufficient fixing as the likely reason.

I like the Sprint Quicksilver Fixer. Super easy to mix, fixes in 3 minutes (4 minutes for Tabular grain films) and gives 30 rolls per liter of working solution.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #9
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I think the fixing times are too short too. You could make your life a lot easier going to a rapid fixer (I use Kodak Rapid Fixer). Even the rapid fixer may need more time than you used. Also, don't forget that you need to wash the film for a long time. I like 30 minutes w/ my stuff. The hose needs to go to the bottom of the tank to work properly. Some people use the Ilford method of washing, and it works, but if you can hook up something to attach to your faucet you can leave it and come back later.

The coffee filters are a good idea. I filter everything through those. It can't hurt. When you agitate the film, use a swirley motion w/ your arms, and don't under agitate or over do it either. The tank needs a firm "drop" onto a piece of wood on the counter after every agitation. Since you are just starting out, it would help to watch some youtube videos on this, and keep exact notes of your processes as you do your own developing, as well as noting the temps. Make sure you're putting enough developer in the tank. I see uneven development from the top to the bottom on some negs.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #10
zauhar
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The top of each frame looks good, is it possible that your solution level in tank was simply too low?

I guess that would be confirmed it the 'bottom' roll in the tank was OK.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #11
Moto-Uno
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Would you be able to post a picture or two of the previous roll you did (and considered ok) ?
I live in Burnaby and I know the water doesn't play a roll in this . Peter
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #12
romeld
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Thanks for the suggestions everyone, I will try fixing the roll again and also start fixing for about 8-10 minutes. I'm going to take a look at those rapid fixers as well! I was using dev.it for the timings and almost all suggested fixing for 3 minutes. Will try using 400-500ml to make sure there is a little more chemicals as well.

Here are a few images from my previous roll (i made the solution the day before). I may have also used 600ml for this instead of the 300ml I've been currently using I can't remember exactly.

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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #13
Bille
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There are quite a few reasons for foggy negatives. But generally, age or uncontrolled light exposure. Is the developing tank all right? Changing bag?
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #14
leicapixie
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Repeat: Double the clearing time of a piece of leader.
It may be longer than 3 minutes..
see my original post.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #15
romeld
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leicapixie View Post
Repeat: Double the clearing time of a piece of leader.
It may be longer than 3 minutes..
see my original post.

Thanks yes I just did this and it took about 4.5 minutes to clear the leader. Will definitely go for 10 next roll.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #16
romeld
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Looks like that did the trick! Will use fixer again on my other rolls and hopefully they turn out better.

From today's roll:
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by romeld View Post
Looks like that did the trick! Will use fixer again on my other rolls and hopefully they turn out better.

From today's roll:



Looks great!
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Problem photos
Old 1 Week Ago   #18
randy stewart
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Problem photos

The images shown clearly suffer from inadequate fixing. That light hazing, looking something like flare, is a thin layer of undeveloped and undissolved light sensitive layer remaining in the emulsion. This can be a problem with TMax films, which commonly require up twice the fixing time of conventional film. Contributing to the problem, you are using Kodak Fixer (not a thiocyanate based rapid fixer), which is much less active. Kodak recommends only a rapid fixer for TMax film, as well as extended fixing time. Suggest you review the processing instructions for TMax film. I smell another YouTube video victim here.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randy stewart View Post
The images shown clearly suffer from inadequate fixing. That light hazing, looking something like flare, is a thin layer of undeveloped and undissolved light sensitive layer remaining in the emulsion. This can be a problem with TMax films, which commonly require up twice the fixing time of conventional film. Contributing to the problem, you are using Kodak Fixer (not a thiocyanate based rapid fixer), which is much less active. Kodak recommends only a rapid fixer for TMax film, as well as extended fixing time. Suggest you review the processing instructions for TMax film. I smell another YouTube video victim here.



He figured it out a week ago. You should have read more of the thread than just the first post.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #20
Ronald M
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You can not over agitate in fix. It is a process that goes to completion, then stops.

300 ml is too much for a stainless tank. The chemicals need to move and wash spent chemicals from all of the film. Measure with water to see what it take to cover the reel.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #21
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Never use Kodak fixer. Ilford Rapid Fixer is the only way to go.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald M View Post
300 ml is too much for a stainless tank. The chemicals need to move and wash spent chemicals from all of the film. Measure with water to see what it take to cover the reel.

Hello Ronald,

300 ml is too little, is what I believe you meant to say.

My small stainless tank will fit between 450 and 500 ml of solution; I typically mix just 400 ml just to keep the math easier. 300 ml might come just to the top of the reel but only barely.

Cheers, Robert
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Old 1 Week Ago   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Filter Factor View Post
Hello Ronald,

300 ml is too little, is what I believe you meant to say.

My small stainless tank will fit between 450 and 500 ml of solution; I typically mix just 400 ml just to keep the math easier. 300 ml might come just to the top of the reel but only barely.

Cheers, Robert



I think Ronald was assuming a single-reel tank. If so, he's right; 300ml is too much for a one roll tank.
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