Go Back   Rangefinderforum.com > Cameras / Gear / Photography > Gearhead Delights > Repair / Camera Care

Repair / Camera Care This is a good place to discuss the care and repair of your photo gear. You can share Do-It-Yourself repair and maintenance, as well as your recommendations for pro repairs. This new forum was created 4/1/07. PLEASE title your thread wisely, so others searching for a certain make of camera or repair person can find your thread easily!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes

W-Nikkor 3.5 f/1.8 disassembly and cleaning
Old 07-28-2016   #1
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
W-Nikkor 3.5 f/1.8 disassembly and cleaning

Has anyone here ever disassembled this lens for cleaning? I have just recieved one of these in Nikon rf mount and it has oily aperture blades and some oily condensation behind the front element group. Does the front element group simply screw out as with the 5cm Nikkors? I've disassembled and cleaned every other Nikkor I've owned and none of them were very complicated. However, this is a unique lens and I thought I'd ask for advice here before trying to open it up.

Thanks
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #2
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Its a very easy lens to work on. The front optical group screws out just like the 5cm Nikkors. The outer 48mm thread and aperture ring stay put while the inner 43mm thread and front optics screw out.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #3
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
Thanks for the quick reply! I'll go ahead and give it a try today. I've been shooting with it on a A7 the past couple days and even with the oil issues the results are quite impressive. I think this lens is a keeper.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #4
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
If you want to completely remove the aperture blades for cleaning, you'll need to go in from the back as well. To remove the optical block from the focus helical, unscrew and remove the rearmost optical group (it just screws off by hand) and then use a pinset or similar to loosen and remove the retaining ring which is visible once the rearmost optical group is removed. It should be straightforward from there.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #5
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
Thanks again, jon. I removed the wide rear element earlier and noticed how thin the retaining ring was. I don't have the right tool to remove that without tearing it up. The pins on my spanner are too thick to fit in the grooves. I'll try cleaning it from the front without removing the blades. The oil seems thin and not sticky. It should be an easy clean with a little naptha.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #6
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Peter, I use this pinset to loosen that hard to access retaining ring. Its just a cheapie from the Daiso 100 YEN store that I've bent to the right angle and then filed the tips to fit into the grooves of the retaining ring. It does the trick. Just need to grip it as low as possible to prevent it from twisting or slipping.

__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #7
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
Thanks for the tip, jon! We have daiso in Korea, too. The lens is now clean (enough). The oil came off the element and blades easily. I'll let the naphtha evaporate and then screw the front group back on.
Thanks again!
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #8
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Jon and Peter:
Would removing oil on blades of this lens be easiest enough for a first foray into lens cleaning? I've never done that before but have this lens coming and the eBay description says "a touch of oil on the blades". (I don't mind buying the tools to do the job properly.) Or should I just send it off to a specialist (Sherry / DAG)?
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #9
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by photomoof View Post
Blades are tricky, pretty easy on the 35, some lenses like the 50 1.1 almost impossible. On the 35 1.8 they are large and nice and flat.

Easy because ... ??? I guess I've been thinking whether the disassembly and reassembly of the optical elements is straightforward or not. But, your comment raises the issue of the blades themselves being more or less tricky. What makes one type easy and another hard? (Perhaps I should pick up some cheap Russian lenses to fool with before I tackle a rare Nikkor LTM.)
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #10
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by photomoof View Post
Some are simply larger and more accessible, and most of all flat. Some are actually slightly curved around an element (never on auto lenses).

The trick is no oil on the blades, and great patience. Some like the Nikkor 50 1.4 almost seem to fall into place.

I handle the blades by their pins, with a tweezer which stays closed (rather than the more common type that stay open). https://www.tedpella.com/twzr-sc_html/twzr-sc.htm
Thanks, pm! Helpful info for a neophyte!
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #11
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
This lens was easy because, as jonmanjiro described, you can access the aperture blade assembly by simply unscrewing the front element unit. I would not recommend trying to remove the blades and clean them individually. I've done that with a couple 5cm 1.4 Nikkors - but only because they had loose blades. Reassembling them properly and getting them back into the lens body is very tedious work. You can clean the blades by repeatedly applying naphtha and wiping it away with lens tissue. Keep doing it until you see no more oily residue.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #12
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
Papercut,
My lens is the S mount version - not LTM. I'm not sure if there would be any difference in the cleaning method. I believe jonmanjiro has both, so maybe he could tell you.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #13
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Jennings View Post
Papercut,
My lens is the S mount version - not LTM. I'm not sure if there would be any difference in the cleaning method. I believe jonmanjiro has both, so maybe he could tell you.
Peter, thanks for both posts! I had (for no good reason) assumes you had the LTM version.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #14
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
Jon and Peter:
Would removing oil on blades of this lens be easiest enough for a first foray into lens cleaning? I've never done that before but have this lens coming and the eBay description says "a touch of oil on the blades". (I don't mind buying the tools to do the job properly.) Or should I just send it off to a specialist (Sherry / DAG)?
If you're reasonably handy at fixing things, I think you'll be fine.

One of my first forays into fixing a lens involved removing the aperture blades from a vintage S-mount W-Nikkor 35/1.8. The aperture ring indicated the lens was stopped down to f/22, but the actual aperture opening was about f/8 when comparing to my reissue S-mount W-Nikkor 35/1.8. So after removing them and much head scratching, I finally worked out that the L-shaped aperture blades were slightly longer on one side and had been previously installed upside down! So I installed them the right way up, reassembled the lens, and the problem was solved.

Reinstalling aperture blades takes a steady hand and patience (I'd be happy to share my technique for this if you decide to try), but if the goal is removing oil, I wouldn't feel like I did a proper cleaning job without removing and fully cleaning them and the aperture blade housing area.

I find RF Nikkors to be very logically designed, and I've never had a problem repairing one. I can't say the same about Leica lenses and Canon LTM lenses!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
Peter, thanks for both posts! I had (for no good reason) assumes you had the LTM version.
The S-mount and LTM W-Nikkor 35/1.8s are very similarly constructed, especially the aperture mechanism. I haven't checked to be 100% sure, but my guess is that the S-mount and LTM aperture blades are identical.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #15
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
If you're reasonably handy at fixing things, I think you'll be fine.

One of my first forays into fixing a lens involved removing the aperture blades from a vintage S-mount W-Nikkor 35/1.8. The aperture ring indicated the lens was stopped down to f/22, but the actual aperture opening was about f/8 when comparing to my reissue S-mount W-Nikkor 35/1.8. So after removing them and much head scratching, I finally worked out that the L-shaped aperture blades were slightly longer on one side and had been previously installed upside down! So I installed them the right way up, reassembled the lens, and the problem was solved.

Reinstalling aperture blades takes a steady hand and patience (I'd be happy to share my technique for this if you decide to try), but if the goal is removing oil, I wouldn't feel like I did a proper cleaning job without removing and fully cleaning them and the aperture blade housing area.

I find RF Nikkors to be very logically designed, and I've never had a problem repairing one. I can't say the same about Leica lenses and Canon LTM lenses!


The S-mount and LTM W-Nikkor 35/1.8s are very similarly constructed, especially the aperture mechanism. I haven't checked to be 100% sure, but my guess is that the S-mount and LTM aperture blades are identical.

Thanks, Jon. I appreciate the advice and your experience! I'll see how the lens looks when it arrives. If I get up the nerve to give it a go, rest assured I'll pester you for your technique on reinstalling the blades.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #16
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
I would agree with Jon that the proper technique for cleaning would be to remove the blades, but I don't think it's 100% necessary in most cases. I may eventually do that with this lens if the oil comes back, but for now I'm content. Oil on blades isn't as critical with RF lenses as it would be with say an Auto Nikkor for a Nikon F with auto aperture adjustment.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-28-2016   #17
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
the eBay description says "a touch of oil on the blades".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Jennings View Post
I would agree with Jon that the proper technique for cleaning would be to remove the blades, but I don't think it's 100% necessary in most cases.
I agree with you Peter, and its most likely not necessary with Kevin's lens. Just the perfectionist in me speaking

The front optical group of the LTM version of the W-Nikkor 35/1.8 is a tad easier to remove than the already easy to remove front optical group of the S-mount version. Just put a rubber band around the front chrome ring for grip, and then twist anticlockwise.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #18
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by photomoof View Post
...
IMO the 35 1.8 is a tough lens to break.
Good to know! It sounds like getting to the blades won't be hard with this lens, even for a neophyte like myself. So I probably should just try naphtha and a Qtip on the surface first, see if that fixes it. Rather than perhaps get in over my head with the blades.

Anyway, sorry to Peter for hijacking his thread!
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #19
Calzone
Gear Whore #1
 
Calzone's Avatar
 
Calzone is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hell Gate, Madhattan
Age: 61
Posts: 9,938
I took my 35/1.8 in LTM to Nippon Photo Clinic here in NYC. This is like a Japanese shop in NYC.

Cost was not inexpensive: about $150.00 I believe.

This was for a CLA.

Cal
__________________
"Vintage Hipster"
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #20
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
Anyway, sorry to Peter for hijacking his thread!
Not at all! The more information the better. Thanks to all who contributed!
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #21
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calzone View Post
I took my 35/1.8 in LTM to Nippon Photo Clinic here in NYC. This is like a Japanese shop in NYC.

Cost was not inexpensive: about $150.00 I believe.

This was for a CLA.

Cal

A couple years ago Nippon did a great job with my Mamiya 7 (just sold). But I'm kinda wanting to figure out basic lens cleaning ... just was not sure I should make a first attempt with a rather rare lens.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #22
Calzone
Gear Whore #1
 
Calzone's Avatar
 
Calzone is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hell Gate, Madhattan
Age: 61
Posts: 9,938
The 35/1.8 Nikkor in LTM is truely a rare lens. Rather costly, but only about 1,600 or 1,700 were ever made. (I believe it is 1.7K over the 1.6K I mention. I mentioned both numbers because I'm not certain.)

Took me a long while to secure one at a reasonable price $1.7K. Also is kinda like a magic lens with a great rendering. Lately I have been using mine on my Monochrom for night shooting at 800 ISO.

Cal
__________________
"Vintage Hipster"
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #23
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
I'm kinda wanting to figure out basic lens cleaning ... just was not sure I should make a first attempt with a rather rare lens.
Don't let the rarity bother you. They're just lumps of metal and glass

When I got my LTM W-Nikkor, the focus was quite stiff so I shot a quick test roll to ensure it was focusing correctly, and then I pulled it apart to clean and relube the focus helical.

This is the focus helical assembly almost fully disassembled. The construction is really very simple and logical.


Here's the lens after reassembling. Now the focus is incredibly smooth with just the right amount of resistance.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Calzone View Post
Lately I have been using mine on my Monochrom for night shooting at 800 ISO.
I'd love to see some of those photos, Cal!
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #24
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by photomoof View Post
Well they are all our babies.
Indeed! Thinking about adopting a red-headed stepchild (Jupiter XYZ) to experiment on first; some babies are more easily replaced than others, after all.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Calzone View Post
The 35/1.8 Nikkor in LTM is truely a rare lens. Rather costly, but only about 1,600 or 1,700 were ever made. (I believe it is 1.7K over the 1.6K I mention. I mentioned both numbers because I'm not certain.)

Took me a long while to secure one at a reasonable price $1.7K. Also is kinda like a magic lens with a great rendering. Lately I have been using mine on my Monochrom for night shooting at 800 ISO.

Cal
Cal, that's just about what mine cost. (Seller kept dropping the BIN price until I knew that if I waited any longer someone else would snap it up.) Been wanting a lower contrast, more "classic" 35 for a while, so ... when opportunity knocks and all that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
Don't let the rarity bother you. They're just lumps of metal and glass

When I got my LTM W-Nikkor, the focus was quite stiff so I shot a quick test roll to ensure it was focusing correctly, and then I pulled it apart to clean and relube the focus helical.

This is the focus helical assembly almost fully disassembled. The construction is really very simple and logical.

Here's the lens after reassembling. Now the focus is incredibly smooth with just the right amount of resistance.
Logical is good. But, if there's one thing I've learned, it's that raw newbie ignorance, when coupled with enthusiasm, can make a hash out of logical any day of the week!
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #25
Calzone
Gear Whore #1
 
Calzone's Avatar
 
Calzone is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hell Gate, Madhattan
Age: 61
Posts: 9,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
I'd love to see some of those photos, Cal!
Jon,

You and your thread on 35/1.8 Nikkor images inspired me. I mostly shoot a 28 Cron as my wide.

On my Monochrom the 35/1.8 Nikkor is deadly. So many great shots.

I have to learn how to post. I print and have avoided posting. I promise at this Sunday's NYC Meet-Up that I'll have some of the guys instruct me.

Cal
__________________
"Vintage Hipster"
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #26
Calzone
Gear Whore #1
 
Calzone's Avatar
 
Calzone is offline
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hell Gate, Madhattan
Age: 61
Posts: 9,938
Kevin,

I consider the 35/1.8 Nikkor a bargain in LTM if you consider how expensive an 8-element 35 Cron can cost. Add on top of that the steep premium of an 8 element 35 Cron without cleaning marks or other defect during a period of Leica soft coatings.

I also love that there is only one distance scale and it is in feet.

Cal
__________________
"Vintage Hipster"
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #27
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Cal,

Yeah the 8-element Cron was another on my short list to try, but you're right, they're virtually never under $2K and often far more than that. Having grown up overseas, I don't mind working in meters, but a simpler-to-read distance scale (no matter what the unit of measure) will be nice.

Now I'm just crossing my fingers that the lens is really clean and in as good condition as the listing said when it arrives (tomorrow if the USPS doesn't somehow manage to mangle delivery as they do so often). Wish there was a "crossing fingers" emoticon ...
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #28
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
There was a very ugly Canon rf with an ugly ltm W-Nikkor 3.5 1.8 that sold on the Yahoo Japan auction site for over $1k a few months ago. As is usual on that auction site, the seller didn't give much info on the condition of the lens. I'd like to hope whoever got it ended up with a nice surprise. I gave up any inclination of bidding when the price passed 50k Yen.

Oh, for comparison, I paid $350 for this S mount copy.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-29-2016   #29
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Jennings View Post
There was a very ugly Canon rf with an ugly ltm W-Nikkor 3.5 1.8 that sold on the Yahoo Japan auction site for over $1k a few months ago. As is usual on that auction site, the seller didn't give much info on the condition of the lens. I'd like to hope whoever got it ended up with a nice surprise. I gave up any inclination of bidding when the price passed 50k Yen.
I watched that auction! IIRC it went up to about 170,000 yen, which is absolutely mind boggling considering the condition

Edit: 171,000 yen!

http://page22.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/j...ion/l351075495
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-30-2016   #30
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
So, not so ugly as I remembered. But still way to much to pay for a mystery lens.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-30-2016   #31
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Thanks again, fellas, for all the advice. The lens is in my grubby paws and there is some oil on the blades but only a thin film on just some of them. Aperture changes are smooth as silk, no hitching or grabbing whatsoever. Think I'm going to use it "a bit" before I tackle the surface cleaning.

It's a little jewel of a lens. Heavy and gorgeous!

This copy did not come with a cap or hood. Any recommendations for those? Are the LTM and S-mounts the same for those?
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-31-2016   #32
Peter Jennings
Registered User
 
Peter Jennings's Avatar
 
Peter Jennings is offline
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seoul
Posts: 578
Both lenses should take 43mm caps and hoods. I use this hood:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/43mm-Metal-W...AAAOSw0vBUk-uu
For caps I'd just use the cheap plastic ones you find on eBay or elsewhere.
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-31-2016   #33
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Jennings View Post
Both lenses should take 43mm caps and hoods. I use this hood:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/43mm-Metal-W...AAAOSw0vBUk-uu
For caps I'd just use the cheap plastic ones you find on eBay or elsewhere.

Thanks Peter! After I posted I did some (better) searches and yeah, the original hoods are rare and expensive. So something cheap and simple is on the menu for me too.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 07-31-2016   #34
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
FWIW I've found my W-Nikkor 35/1.8 LTM to be very flare resistant (quite impressive for vintage glass actually) so I don't bother using a hood. I guess the recessed front element helps a lot here. Instead, I use a quality UV filter to protect the front element.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-01-2016   #35
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Yeah I've heard that before too, Jon.

Sadly, after developing my test roll with this lens, I've discovered flare even when stopped down (f8). Sure enough, closer inspection reveals haze on the front element. Central area is obviously flaring badly. Looks like I either need to send it in to someone or try doing both haze-clean up and oil clean up at the same time.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-01-2016   #36
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
Sadly, after developing my test roll with this lens, I've discovered flare even when stopped down (f8). Sure enough, closer inspection reveals haze on the front element. Here are two pics from the test roll. Both shot at the sky, but not into the sun (it was darkly overcast). Central area is obviously flaring badly. Looks like I either need to send it in to someone or try doing both haze-clean up and oil clean up at the same time.
The haze looks like its on the inside of the front element? If so, the curvature of the front optics is quite deceiving and there's a pretty good chance the haze is on the surface in front of the aperture blades rather than on the underside of the front element (and indeed the haze might even be caused by the oil on the blades). Since its dead easy to do with the LTM version, I'd unscrew the front optical group and take a look.
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-01-2016   #37
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
The haze looks like its on the inside of the front element? If so, the curvature of the front optics is quite deceiving and there's a pretty good chance the haze is on the surface in front of the aperture blades rather than on the underside of the front element (and indeed the haze might even be caused by the oil on the blades). Since its dead easy to do with the LTM version, I'd unscrew the front optical group and take a look.
That's what I'm hoping!

To remove the front optical group, do I need to take the front ring (with all the lens info and Nippon Kogaku Japan, serial # etc) on it first? Or just use unscrew (rubber band on the chrome filter ring as you suggested above)?
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-01-2016   #38
jonmanjiro
Moderator
 
jonmanjiro's Avatar
 
jonmanjiro is offline
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Yokohama
Posts: 5,309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papercut View Post
Or just use unscrew (rubber band on the chrome filter ring as you suggested above)?
this !!!!!!
__________________
flickr
Instagram
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-01-2016   #39
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonmanjiro View Post
this !!!!!!
Hrmmm, it is on there really tight then. Had a good grip on it and it wouldn't budge one bit.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote

Old 08-01-2016   #40
Papercut
Registered User
 
Papercut's Avatar
 
Papercut is offline
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Westchester county, NY (and Chongqing whenever I can get there)
Posts: 1,019
Okay I got it off and I think the news is bad. I think the haze is on the INSIDE of the front element. Not the backside. So I suspect this is going back to the seller.

EDIT: Well, now I'm not so sure. Okay, I'll go get some lighter fluid later today and do some cleaning of the blades and the rear surface of the front element. See how that looks when I'm through.
__________________
-- Kevin

=========
Only connect.
=========

flickr photostream
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 22:49.


vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

All content on this site is Copyright Protected and owned by its respective owner. You may link to content on this site but you may not reproduce any of it in whole or part without written consent from its owner.