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dourbalistar

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d__b

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Ooh, I need to take a look at this new Fred Herzog book. I love his colour work.

I've ordered a Harry Gruyaert book at my local independent book store the other day. Can't wait to receive it.

But the last book I've actually bought and already received is Alone Street by Gregory Crewdson. I find his work very fascinating. It's very different from the work I usually enjoy (documentary, candid stuff) but it's both beautiful and mysterious, almost haunting.
 

Zuiko-logist

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Thank you for the link. Very interesting work.

I just received a small package of books (booklets, really) from https://www.caferoyalbooks.com/ I haven't had a chance to get deeply into them but they look impressive.

If you are not familiar with them, Cafe Royal publishs small weekly editions of books mainly involving England and Ireland by various photographers. Not pretty landscapes but B&W humanist and photojournalistic essays of events or geographic areas. The reproduction is not outstanding but they are worth the very low prices charged. I'm not familiar with most of the photographers but then I'm not located in that area of the world. It's good photography of mostly interesting subjects even to this non-Englishman.
 

mconnealy

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River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West by Rebecca Solnit.


I'd only read Solnit's political commentary until I picked up this book at my favorite used book shop in Albuquerque. In River of Shadows she provides a lot of detail about Muybridge and his extraordinary innovations in photography, but she also gives historical context to his life at the end of the 19th Century. I only had given the photographer passing attention because of his high speed photos of animal locomotion. As Solnit documents, however, before he invented a whole new genre of the art Muybridge was a practitioner of landscape photography in the heroic tradition of wet plates and giant cameras. She also details the photographer's abrupt personality change following a head injury which led to his becoming a murderer, and perhaps contributed to his inventiveness.

Solnit's writing style is dense with ideas and requires more attention than I was sometimes able to summon with my bedtime reading habit. She also left some things unexplained about the technical aspects of Muybridge's innovations in high-speed photography. Solnit and others allege that Muybridge achieved shutter speeds in excess of 1/1000 seconds. That seems feasible and true in regard to the mechanical accomplishment and the published results, but there must also have been some chemical innovations in creating adequate plate sensitivity and processing to allow actual recording of the images. It would be interesting to see the actual negatives which apparently needed some considerable amount of embellishment to produce the positives.

There is also no mention in Solnit's account of supplemental lighting to make the high-speed images. Edison invented the electric bulb in 1880 and the two inventors knew each other, so there is that. More important, perhaps, is the fact that Muybridge played a fundamental role in the invention of moving pictures which Edison capitalized on.
 

Malcolm M

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Two from the York Book Fair. First, the relevant one- Margaret Bourke-White photographer (note trendy lower case title)....

DSC_6245.JPG

Second, and off at a tangent, Geoffrey Fletcher The London that Nobody Knows. There was a 1967 film based on the book, more-or-less on a tape loop on Talking Pictures TV, in which James Mason, of all people, tours the less frequented parts of the capital away from Swingin' London (which itself looks remarkably quaint at this remove). The Camden Roundhouse before it was a concert venue, the appalling slums of Spitalfields (current price of leasehold flat £1.75 million), the meths drinkers brawling in the street. Watch it next time it's on. Can anyone identify the camera in the escapologist scene?

Photography Yearbook 1997. I had to rescue this from an Oxfam shop. Already in my collection, so given away to a deserving home.
 

Zuiko-logist

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I saw the London Nobody Knows - fascinating, especially the Roundhouse and the surrounding tracks - now extremely valuable real estate and the Roundhouse is a great venue. Will check out the camera if I see it again.

Two from the York Book Fair. First, the relevant one- Margaret Bourke-White photographer (note trendy lower case title)....

View attachment 4815312

Second, and off at a tangent, Geoffrey Fletcher The London that Nobody Knows. There was a 1967 film based on the book, more-or-less on a tape loop on Talking Pictures TV, in which James Mason, of all people, tours the less frequented parts of the capital away from Swingin' London (which itself looks remarkably quaint at this remove). The Camden Roundhouse before it was a concert venue, the appalling slums of Spitalfields (current price of leasehold flat £1.75 million), the meths drinkers brawling in the street. Watch it next time it's on. Can anyone identify the camera in the escapologist scene?

Photography Yearbook 1997. I had to rescue this from an Oxfam shop. Already in my collection, so given away to a deserving home.
 

agentlossing

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@Judge Holden and @agentlossing, not sure if you knew, but there's a new book called Fred Herzog: Black and White featuring his black and white work. Newly published at the end of 2022:
I've received the book now, and, while I like it, it doesn't hold up to his color work. I think the Vancouver of his era was very much a color town, and the unburdened enthusiasm of the scenes he depicted just don't call out in B&W... but it's an important record of his development.
 

filmtwit

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Towell, Larry The Mennonites: Biographical Sketch. Phaidon Press Limited , Regents Wharf All Saints Street London. 1901 pages. ISBN: 0-7148-3961-2.

BTW- for anyone who might own the first edition, did it come with a dust cover? I know it has a slip cover, but depending on my searches, it looks like might or might not have come with a dust jacket too?

Thanks
 

d__b

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Finally got this Harry Gruyaert book. Absolutely beautiful work & a nice addition to my library.
 

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jsrockit

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Luigi Ghiri - Between the Lines
David Rothenberg - Roosevelt Station
Bernhard Fuchs - Hofe
Rich-Joseph Facun - Little Cities
Andrea Simonato - Il Malocchio
 
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